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Old 21 August 2006, 10:54   #31
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Country: UK - England
Town: london
Boat name: Folly Points
Make: Halmatic
Length: 10m +
Engine: Inboard diesel
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so some of you think desiel is better

Votes on the subject then..................
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Old 21 August 2006, 17:32   #32
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Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
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Posts: 5,015
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Originally Posted by toby4594
Hi your source of information is incorrect the scorpions sea keeping qualities are legendary ,have you actually had a look at that hull ,Thats one deep vee Go and have a look thats the only way to find out...
Yes... you're right in principle, but it's not just down to the depth of the V - in fact Scorpion aren't the deepest V hulls by a long way, there are many other design features that make it one of the best general purpose high speed RIB hulls. And high speed is important, as they perform best at speed, to keep the reverse chine working. 8m+ Redbays and Ocean may perform a little better in a really tough head sea, but at speed or in a following sea, a Scorpion is very hard to beat!
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Old 21 August 2006, 17:42   #33
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Originally Posted by Andy Gee
Agreed petrol is more harder to get, but it is getting better. Volvo electronics lets not go there, but their legs are second to none.
Look at the number fitted, Sunseeker/Fairline/Sealine etc etc etc compaired to the number of failures.

It all depends on what you want the boat to do, how long you want to keep it and how many hours a year you want to use it, and for me it has got to be diesel. Slow and sluggish, not some of the ones I have been on. We have far more Diesel Revengers and Scorpions up hear than outboards, hence my question.

Repair bills, in over 18.5k hours running a Daewoo in a trawler only bills are for servicing (250 every 300hrs) and a top end inspection (500 at 18k hours).
Overall hours on ribs with Twin Yamaha diesel, about 3300h combined, servicing about 150 every 100h, 1 drive ring and overhaul (700) Impellors 70, all work done myself.
What is the reatil price nowadays for say a 250hp four stroke?

Deck space is defenatly an issue with inboards though, especially if they are <7m, however it's not really an issue on the larger boats.

What slow, sluggish diesel boat are you stuck with? I have never had a diesel for sale for long, so long as its priced correctly .
Cheers
Andy
Just had my 250 F/Stroke Yamaha serviced 135 plus the dreded
I look at a diesal option as we ordered from new and yes if you live in the Highlands then petrol is a probleam but as RIVA as said unless you are commercial then i for one could not make the figuers add up over the course of five years, add in the cost of a leg failure and i found that you could buy a new out board for the same money.
but that only my oppinion.
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Old 21 August 2006, 18:34   #34
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Country: UK - Scotland
Make: HumberOceanOffshore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribowner
Votes on the subject then..................
Well I voted with my feet and went diesel. It is true that it takes a good while in fuel costs on an outboard to reach the cost of initial purchase of a diesel vessel but that is not a valid argument for many of us. I suppose if you compare two similar boats of the same type and make then the argument is more valid.

However, the high initial cost of boats such as Redbays and my own boat is not because it is diesel it is because we have bought a lot of vessel and a lot of facility. They are not simply a hull, wee consol and a couple of seats.

When I came home in my previous outboard rib my money was gone, I'd burned it. When I come home in my present diesel rib the rib isn't used up and the facilities the boat has are still there....that's where my money is.

For me it is also true that an initial high purchase price was easier to deal with than a constant high drain on my pocket. With my previous outboard boat, after the early enthusiasm had wained, I began to question the sanity of paying 100 to travel 40 miles and back for a drink and sandwich at a pub. Today, I've had a four hour cruise and I've come home having spent slightly less than 25 quid on fuel.

I made my lunch on the boat, because it has the facilities and I enjoy that, whilst sitting in the sun chatting to a couple who were interested in a vessel which is a bit different.

It's just a whole lot better experience.
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Old 22 August 2006, 05:56   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker
Well I voted with my feet and went diesel. It is true that it takes a good while in fuel costs on an outboard to reach the cost of initial purchase of a diesel vessel but that is not a valid argument for many of us. I suppose if you compare two similar boats of the same type and make then the argument is more valid.

However, the high initial cost of boats such as Redbays and my own boat is not because it is diesel it is because we have bought a lot of vessel and a lot of facility. They are not simply a hull, wee consol and a couple of seats.

When I came home in my previous outboard rib my money was gone, I'd burned it. When I come home in my present diesel rib the rib isn't used up and the facilities the boat has are still there....that's where my money is.

For me it is also true that an initial high purchase price was easier to deal with than a constant high drain on my pocket. With my previous outboard boat, after the early enthusiasm had wained, I began to question the sanity of paying 100 to travel 40 miles and back for a drink and sandwich at a pub. Today, I've had a four hour cruise and I've come home having spent slightly less than 25 quid on fuel.

I made my lunch on the boat, because it has the facilities and I enjoy that, whilst sitting in the sun chatting to a couple who were interested in a vessel which is a bit different.

It's just a whole lot better experience.
Couldn't agree more, JW. Given a choice it would be diesel for me for the reasons you mention - and a slightly bigger RIB. I have to save up for every cruise and be careful with the throttle. Buying meals ashore (even if there was anywhere to do so in my chosen anchorage) would drastically cut the miles I could cruise, so I eat aboard too. Next year, with the boat equipped with my 'super boat tent', that I intend to make over winter, I hope to spend some nights aboard. Being self sufficient on a 5.3m Destroyer is going to take some initiative, I think.

Perhaps we in Scotland have a different approach to cruising and different priorities from those in the south?

Tony
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Old 22 August 2006, 06:07   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker
Well I voted with my feet and went diesel.
Me too . Fuel at 50 ppl was a strong consideration along with its availability rather than have to hump fuel cans from petrol stations. If the red disappears then the argument isn't as straight forward, however I for one will probably stay with an inboard diesel as I want to do most of the work and servicing myself and know that I can fill up easily with pumped fuel.

Pete
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