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Old 06 May 2000, 08:37   #1
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Navigation

I'm a firm believer that electronic navigation is the way to go on fast open boats like RIBs.

Paper charts have their place for route planning at home then loading waypoints into a GPS, but using them for passage making is difficult to say the least.

With GPS now more accurate than ever, it is likely to become more accepted as the prime means of navigation. With hand-helds costing less than a full tank of fuel, there is no reason not to have two more independent GPSs on a RIB. In fact it's getting to the point where you are more likely to lose a paper chart overboard than to have a complete electronics failure!

How do you navigate on your RIB? Paper charts, GPS, chart plotter, or blind faith?



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Old 18 May 2000, 09:10   #2
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There is nothing more satisfying than Navigating a RIB, especially at speed with the added bonus of reaching your destination with out getting lost. Sure enough, electronic aids make this task a lot easier.
As for paper charts, well having tried to use one on a 4.8m RIB in a force 7 and its associated rough sea is challenging to say the least. So I totally agree that they are best used for detailed passage planning in the comforts of home.
For all of the longer trips that we do, we will photocopy relevant sections of a chart (or scan them in to a pc) and mark on these, all the courses to steer, distances and all sorts of other useful info. Once we are happy with the information, we then either get them laminated or store them in plastic zip bags. The waypoints are also entered into the GPS. This method has worked well for numerous trips.
An equally good method we have used is to print out in effect a sheet of all the waypoints with details of course to steer, distance to run, and back bearings. So each time you approach a waypoint such as a buoy , the navigator/helmsman reads off the next course to steer and off you go. I learnt this method on a RYA course and we successfully navigated to an unlit post in the dark while maintaining about 20knots without the use of any electronic navigational aids.
While both of these 'paper' methods are more than adequate to help you get where your going but using them in conjunction with GPS makes it that much easier while knowing that you still have a non-electronic version that you can rely on in the ever decreasing event that the GPS fails you.

Going back on the subject of charts, I got invited to a seminar held by the Admiralty last year, one of the subjects that come up was waterproof charts, which I believe that they started to sell at this years London Boat Show. I voiced my opinion for us poor RIB owners and the fact that their charts weren't much use onboard RIBs and subsequently sent them a couple of our home made waterproof versions.
As luck would have it, while at the London Boat Show this year, I got roped into a survey with the Admiralty to look at some new products that they are thinking of producing. To my surprise, they had some laminated A3, nicely folded charts that looked very familiar! The layout of them means they would fit into the console of most if not all RIB's.



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Old 14 June 2000, 11:00   #3
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GPS with some sort of waterproof chart works well, but passage planning really has to be done in advance "flight plan" style.

The great benefit of electronic chart plotters is the ease of changing your planned route once you are underway. Having said that, some of the plotters used on RIBs have screen that are so small that I have to wonder how much use they really are.

The best charts I have found are from Stanfords. They are printed on plastic so are genuinely waterproof rather than water resistant like the Imray ones. The biggest diadvantage is that coverage is limited to the southern UK.

Now a Raytheon 620 would be nice . . .

John

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Old 08 October 2000, 03:12   #4
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This season I used a method very much like the one described by LamacqS. Even though it works very well, one needs to plan in advance and prepare all necessary waypoint information and print charts.

I would like to make this process a bit easier and I am planing to buy a chart plotter next season.

I almost decided to buy Garmin GPSMAP 180 when I was told about Lowrance GlobalMap 1600.

On paper they both look pretty much like, with Garmin having a bit higher display resolution (and larger display if I am not mistaken). I have arranged for a demonstration at a local shop, but I would like to know if anybody has used any of these plotters for RIB cruising?

I am especially interested in the Lowrance plotter (reliability, menu system, display and chart readability...) since I already have read a lot about the Garmin. According to some reports the biggest problem with the Garmin is a very slow zoom function. Apart from that it looks very good.

And does anybody know how much Navionics charts for Lowrance cost? According to one guy they cost US$99. But according to the Navionics site they cost as much as other charts, US$99-US$299. Which is rather strange since Lowrance does not use chart cartridges. Anybody that can shed some light on this?

Thanks,

Sasa

P.S. I know some of the larger plotters are much better, but neither my budget nor the space on the console would allow for them
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Old 09 October 2000, 12:20   #5
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Hello LamacqS,

Garmin 235 is a Garmin 230 + sounder, isn't it? Garmin 230 looks like a 180 but it's bigger and has a larger screen. While I believe it is a good product, the price is a bit too high for my liking. I would like to pay no more than US$600.

On the other hand, if I don't find anything that suits my needs I may decide to double the sum, but then I need to ask my girlfriend for permission

Sasa
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Old 09 October 2000, 19:43   #6
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I've used the Garmin 235 for almost two years and it has been generally good.
The display is big enough to read in rough conditions and all the screens can be setup to include all the fields that you wish to see. The refresh speed when you change zoom can take up to 5 secs.

The aftersales support from Garmin in my experience has been excellent.

The only downside is the mounting bracket, its not up to the job.

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Old 11 October 2000, 11:07   #7
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I find that is much easier (and cheaper!) to use the Texaco road map. Most navigation charts contain a lot of confusing, irrelevant information, are too big and don't double up as a road map. If you really want to lash out then buy a road map with a plasticky cover to guard against total soggo when it falls in.
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Old 11 October 2000, 13:02   #8
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Quote:
I find that is much easier (and cheaper!) to use the Texaco road map
That's OK so long as you are sure that

- you don't need to plot your position from a GPS
- you don't need to enter a waypoint into a GPS
- there are no hazards on your route (oh, like sand bars, big rocks lurking under the surface, submarine barriers)
- you don't want to cross a traffic separation scheme (day trip to Calais from Dover)
- you don't need any depth information

For high speed navigation, when my RIB is doing about 60 knots, I do tend to use a road map for navigation. But that's because I'm on the motorway with the boat on a trailer . . .

John


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Old 12 October 2000, 02:50   #9
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And of course if you are member of BIBOA your navigation is extremely simple - You follow the guy in front!!

Ohh bitchy!

Alan.
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Old 22 October 2001, 05:08   #10
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Good morning all

Having found the 'search' feature (I'm a slow learner) I spent some time browsing old threads etc and came across this one.

It contained this reply from 'gaelforce':

I find that is much easier (and cheaper!) to use the Texaco road map. Most navigation charts contain a lot of confusing, irrelevant information, are too big and don't double up as a road map. If you really want to lash out then buy a road map with a plasticky cover to guard against total soggo when it falls in.

Was this sarcasm or a joke?

Surely no one would actualy do this.

Bye fo now.

Keith Hart
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