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Old 13 January 2018, 05:54   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Ballistico View Post
Thanks for the recommendation, I will contact Nugent for the screen.



The console position is not perfect I agree but when running she gets up on the plane very quickly. On a budget I had to compromise, I wanted the console further forward with a suicide seat at the front and instead of jockeys I wanted a lean post.



I did not know green was bad luck, when you read the next part about the engine you may well be right.



So she looks good, I didn't spend too much money, the tubes hold air, the deck is painted, cushions replaced and console nice and neat. I spent a lot of weekends and just over 2k this includes some labour as well, for a lot of the work I just held tools and learnt.



Unfortunately the same can't be said mechanically, the fuel tanks have been cleaned out twice by two different people, the second chap did a proper job removing water, cardboard and cable ties. All the fuel lines to the engine were replaced along with new water filters. The boat had stood a while and I wasn't comfortable using the fuel.



This is the short version:



The engine engine starts first time and runs smoothly, so before taking her out I decided to do a full service, replacing everything recommended for the hours done (3200hrs - I really wish the first mechanic told me that). On the first run we started slow pottering around the harbour and filling her up with fuel and the engine worked perfectly.



On the second run she stated first time but when trying WOT outside the harbour she was sluggish but becoming faster and faster until all of a sudden she lost power and would not rev over 2500, when she should be at around 6000. Even when she was running well before the loss of power she was only getting to about 3500 - 4000 revs.



We tried a lot of different things but nothing worked, each time we tried something she would perform a little better but each time after about 20 mins she would backfire then lose power.



I have had so many people look at it and over Christmas I bumped into a mate who was with a mate who is a marine Engineer and hes spent a great deal of time on the engine and I am now confident that every avenue has been investigated. It turns out the compression is well down, there is a problem with one of the pistons he gave me a detailed report and the diagnosis is I could continue spending money with no guarantee of fixing it or buy a new (good secondhand engine).



So a new secondhand engine it is. I did well on the initial purchase, on doing up the hull and deck etc. I knew there was a big bill coming but was hoping it would be the end of the season. I am just a little gutted that I have spent 2500 on the engine so far but as I am quickly learning this is the joy of boat ownership!!!!


Welcome to the world of

Break
Out
Another
Thousand
S

It can be a short, sharp, expensive learning curve.
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Old 13 January 2018, 07:05   #12
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I think you are right in going for a good secondhand "Warranted" engine rather than chasing faults as it seems to be an expensive and sometimes painfully ongoing saga. There could well be some deals on new earlier model 250s about? Worth talking to Mobile Marine in Axminster or Barry Winsor Marine Camberley i think? Maybe even Ribcraft themselves?

Still a really nice Rib
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Old 13 January 2018, 07:36   #13
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I have had a few good engineers look at the engine both at the marina where I bought it and locally here at Portsmouth. All have been very pragmatic approaching it in a structured manner and with the fact it is an old engine with very high hours in mind. There is a point where I will be throwing good money after bad, to be honest I should have been a little less optaimistic. Luckily my local engineer has found me an engine, I always knew I would need one at some point but I had hoped to get a season or two out of the original. This is expensive hobby but there really isn't anything better than messing around on boats.
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Old 13 January 2018, 08:34   #14
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With all due respect I don't think pragmatic/ good engineers can be used here when they don't know what is wrong after 2.5k thrown at it.

Out of curiosity, was a leakdown test done and if so what were the numbers if you know?

Btw I wouldnt be surprised if they didn't do a leak down test, I called 4 dealers near me and 3 of them didn't have the equipment ( the kit is about 150 quid for good stuff) and 1 didn't even know what it was! Yet, it is one of first troubleshooting steps for compression issues. It 99% nails down why you have low compression without tearing it apart and gives you an idea what to expect when you do, only takes about an hour to do all 6 cylinders.

Anyways, we will never know and glad you are fixed up with another motor.....enjoy.
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Old 13 January 2018, 11:34   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikey Dave View Post
You do know that green is bad luck on boats
Bugger

I'm green with envy when I see most of the boats at ERR
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Old 13 January 2018, 11:53   #16
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Where do you keep her ? There is brilliant marine engineer who does most of the engines in E.c.a . He would be your man
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Old 13 January 2018, 12:09   #17
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Originally Posted by mickpin View Post
Where do you keep her ? There is brilliant marine engineer who does most of the engines in E.c.a . He would be your man
If he can find a good recommended engineer my thoughts would be repair the current engine then you know what you have. Buying any used engine is a gamble and you could end up in the same position with the used replacement engine.
I'd invest a few hours labour to get the head stripped off and get a definitive diagnosis
A leakdown test will only point you in a certain direction hence a lot of engineers think it's a waste of time and don't bother.
The only sure way to diagnose a compression fault is take it apart
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Old 14 January 2018, 06:29   #18
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Originally Posted by beamishken View Post
If he can find a good recommended engineer my thoughts would be repair the current engine then you know what you have. Buying any used engine is a gamble and you could end up in the same position with the used replacement engine.
I'd invest a few hours labour to get the head stripped off and get a definitive diagnosis
A leakdown test will only point you in a certain direction hence a lot of engineers think it's a waste of time and don't bother.
The only sure way to diagnose a compression fault is take it apart


Pardon my ignorance but what's a "leak down test"?
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Old 14 January 2018, 06:44   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikey Dave View Post
Pardon my ignorance but what's a "leak down test"?
It's what all the forumites claim to be the all telling test of a compression fault.
Basically you feed compressed air into the cylinder to determine where it's leaking from.
It can narrow down the leakage to piston or valve or gasket to waterway.
In reality it a waste of time as you need to strip the head off any way, the time you spent testing you could almost have the thing stripped for a proper diagnosis.
It won't tell you the leaky valve is a crack in the head or a burned valve. It wont tell you the leaky piston is a huge groove in the liner or a broken ring nor will it tell you the leak into waterway is a cracked or corroded head or block or just a failed gasket.
I've never done it in 35 years in the motor trade and never actually seen any of my pals or competitors doing it
Another Google find!
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Old 14 January 2018, 07:41   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beamishken View Post
It's what all the forumites claim to be the all telling test of a compression fault.
Basically you feed compressed air into the cylinder to determine where it's leaking from.
It can narrow down the leakage to piston or valve or gasket to waterway.
In reality it a waste of time as you need to strip the head off any way, the time you spent testing you could almost have the thing stripped for a proper diagnosis.
It won't tell you the leaky valve is a crack in the head or a burned valve. It wont tell you the leaky piston is a huge groove in the liner or a broken ring nor will it tell you the leak into waterway is a cracked or corroded head or block or just a failed gasket.
I've never done it in 35 years in the motor trade and never actually seen any of my pals or competitors doing it
Another Google find!


Ahh! Cheers Ken
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