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Old 23 December 2004, 16:23   #1
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Most Seaworthy Hull?

We've talked about Outboards and electrics in length, but if I was in the market for a 5.5m'ish RIB Hull for a project, which one would I go for? And why?
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Old 23 December 2004, 16:31   #2
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If by seaworthy you mean the most rugged then It would in my opinion be a Searider mil spec or a Delta.

Both these boats are built to withstand many years of everyday use in whatever the conditions happen to be. They will give up a long time after you do!

I have a searider with the tubes off at the moment come and have a look at it and sea how strongly built it is. But don't get exited it's not 4 sale
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Old 23 December 2004, 16:52   #3
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Searider

I'll second that.
The hull lay-up appears to be much heavier than my Scorpion.

However, a 5.4m Searider does appear to be a small 5.4m boat.

Mine is for sale - but probably not in the "Project" category.
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Old 23 December 2004, 17:28   #4
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Seariders certainly look as if they can handle the rough stuff as well as have great performance, but they are an old design......Did they get it so right back then? Is it the fact that if you wanted a fast RIB you'd sacrifice rough weather handling and vica-verca?

So many people buy a Searider as their first RIB, then a year or so later buy a different make! And quite often of the same approximate size.
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Old 23 December 2004, 18:04   #5
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do they!That surprises me that they change to a similar sized boat.

If it's speed you want and are not too bothered about construction then you'd have to consider a Falcon or a Ribeye as they both have good hull designs. I know it's Xmas but i just couldn't stop myself. Sorry

I guess you really need to define the term Seaworthy and Project. I thought you meant a tough old hull that you could work on!

If you are looking for non commercial boats in that size Ribcraft/Gemin/Humber and XS rib have all impressed me O think Zebidee has given a good account of itself over the years
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Old 23 December 2004, 18:37   #6
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Being a Searider owner and a very old one at that I would like to add that IMHO the Searider is not a very good hull for fast cruising.

I think its more for rough seas.

I find at high speeds mine has a tendancy to wander quite drastically. I think the experts call it chine. That is on a smooth sea at about 35 Mph on a 4 Mtr hull.

Thats my experience and you really need to be aware of it. It is bad enough to throw you in to the sea if your not expecting it.

Regards and Merry Xmas Biggles.
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Old 23 December 2004, 19:02   #7
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Hulls designs tend to differ drastically however, boats such as seariders and good old pacifics and arctics have similar characteristics.

Ive found that with pacific 22's in particular, cruising is relatively boring. It'll chug away at say 25kts all day long which, for a rib, isnt that fast.

Handling in terms of doing tight turns etc isnt particularly impressive because the weight of the boat combined with relatively low diesel performance tend to see it fall off the plane pretty sharpish!

And most of all, when cruising in the calm, the ride isnt anything special! Not particuarly soft or tranquil.

However, the minute the going gets rough, youve got a remarkable sea boat which will punch its way through some horrific conditions and suddenly become a dream to handle as all of the points mentioned before no longer matter! Itll go all day long like this and not blink an eyelid, as ultimately, i think this is what the boats underlying design aim is.

Similar scenario with seariders.

Average performance in every day usage, great when you really need to get somewhere in poor conditions!

You get the idea, even if the post has drifted slightly.....theyre not intended to be fun boats. Their for work and survival and their design reflects this in every way.

It may not be the nimblest on a nice day, but you can bet it will be quicker and safer than that other 5.5m RIB on a bad day!

You need to identify your need and then think, right, is this the boat for me? Am i actually going to benefit from these characteristics or am i just sacrificing comfort for the sake of it?

Oh, and with regards to the age of the design - why fix it if its not broken? Its done great so far so why risk fouling that reputation with what could turn out to be a re-design disaster?

Im babbling now but theres some more points to consider - hope this helps a bit!

Cheers

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Old 23 December 2004, 19:24   #8
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Ribtec 585 .... very good hull, handles the sea very well although the boat is a bit wet!
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Old 23 December 2004, 20:17   #9
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So really it comes down to a good comprimise then. An Ideal RIB for all would see it go like a bat out of hell on a calm day, with a given power power plant but would be able to handle the rough stuff still retaining it's calm weather composure.
So what hull offers what we want? I guess its down to personal choice in the end!

My BWM is excellent from a medium chopp to flat calm conditions. Where I suffer is when the Sea's kick up a bit, then there's an increased risk of stuffing and things like that. Never felt unsafe at all, even when full of water. Just have to back off quite a bit.


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Old 24 December 2004, 04:58   #10
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Andy, get your self a Osprey Viper!
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