Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 22 November 2003, 14:12   #1
Member
 
Country: UK
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1
MoB recovery

Does anyone find it difficult recovering a man overboard if they are big?
I've heard a method is deflating one of the air tubes, has anyone ever done this?
Are there any other methods anyone knows about?

Cheers

Al
__________________

__________________
al_young is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 November 2003, 15:01   #2
Trade member
 
Andre's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: West Sussex
Boat name: Grey Mist
Make: Parker 800 Baltic
Length: 8m +
Engine: 2xMercury Diesel 170
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 3,457
RIBase
Send a message via Skype™ to Andre
Try a Jason's Cradle, a very useful piece of kit

www.jasonscradle.co.uk/fastrescuescraft.html


Andre
Andre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 November 2003, 15:03   #3
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Hi Al,

Yes - this is not the easiest job.

We had to recover three of our friends back in October, and the six footer was the last man back in the boat and not easy!

I don't think that deflating the tubes would have helped - out casualty wanted something solid to hang on to, and decreasing the boat's buoyancy was not on the agenda as we went up to six people on board with the stern swinging into wind and waves comning over the transom.

Get an MOB ladder like this: http://129.35.131.25/webapp/wcs/stor...1&itemId=29008 or use the yachtie's technique of an old sail (not that I have one of those hanging around on the RIB! )

Alternatively, look at this: http://www.wavelengthtraining.co.uk/toppage6.htm
__________________
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 November 2003, 16:06   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Milford Haven
Boat name: Various
Make: Commercial
Length: 10m +
Engine: Screw / Voith / Jets
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 791
Send a message via MSN to Alex Brown
Whilst taking my gran up river for the first time in years on a darkish evening in April this year, and after telling her that small boats don't normally sink to set her mind at ease, we stumbled across 6 large guys with rucksacks on a 2 man dinghy with tiny outboard.

As we passed their main sailing boat, before loosing sight of them since they were behind it, the transom looked very low down, and sure enough, as we came round the other side, the boat had already sunk and turned over.

In the wonderfully strong current we managed to get them on board, but that took two of us since they all seemed to have had a bit to drink

Since they had rucksacks on, wellies, and no lifejackets, it was important to get them out of the water pretty quickly - we couldn't see an easy way for this other than to grab onto one arm each and just haul them over the tubes into the rib.

I don't think a ladder would have worked in this case, but I dare say something like on Wavelength's website may have worked but might have taken a bit of time to carry out for 6 people, especially in a strong incoming current.

That rescue job reduced our time available at the Pub which is only accessible by river a few times a year too

I agree with you there Richard that deflating the tubes may not be such a good idea - despite it being calm, we managed to get a good amount of water into the boat from the soaking people. It took a while for the bilge pump to clear the water since I couldn't drop the trunk as we aren't allowed to plane up river. I don't think I'd have been happy to take on more water than absolutely required

-Alex
__________________
Flickr Photos
Youtube Videos
Alex Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 November 2003, 04:40   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Pwllheli-North Wales
Boat name: Delta 1
Make: Delta
Length: 6m +
Engine: Mariner 90hp Optimax
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 2,367
Providing you still have 2 persons in the boat, you should turn the engine off-

1- Take the casualty to the back end of the tubes (dont let go of them).
2- Put there back to the tubes.
3- One Person either side of the casualty, holding them by there life jacket/buoyancy aid or under there arms.
4- Light push down (not heads under the water).
5- Lift up and slide the back side on to the tubes

I have seen two small adults lift an 18 stone person in to rib without problem using this method.

The theory of this is taught on a Level 2 course.
__________________
JG Marine Services Ltd Specialist Safety Boat Services

Bodfuan Shoot Ltd Traditional British Game Shooting
Jono Garton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 November 2003, 05:06   #6
Ian
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Morfa Nefyn, Gwynedd
Boat name: Black Jack
Make: Pro Sport
Length: 7m +
Engine: Suzuki 250hp 4/
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 929
Recovering someone from the water into an inflated liferaft is taught and practiced on the MCA Sea Survival course. Granted, it's not the same as a rib, but the principle is the same. Two people can haul any sized person onboard providing it's done correctly.
The lowest part of the rib is by far the easiest point at which to bring someone on, and once holding the casualty do not let go.
It's tiring after you've pulled a few up even when they have life jackets on and it's practice conditions. Alex, you and your Gran did well to collect 6 blokes from the water in the state of dress you described. Nice one.
The Sea Survival course I did was at Fleetwood Offshore Centre in their environmental pool, even if you aren't looking to go for you commercial ticket, it's a brilliant day. Well worth doing for the experience and for that 'Just in case' factor.
__________________
www.peninsularibs.com
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 November 2003, 05:14   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Milford Haven
Boat name: Various
Make: Commercial
Length: 10m +
Engine: Screw / Voith / Jets
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 791
Send a message via MSN to Alex Brown
Quote:
Originally posted by Ian
Alex, you and your Gran did well to collect 6 blokes from the water in the state of dress you described. Nice one.
Ahh, I didn't say that there were 4 of us on board including my gran - oops
If it was just me and her, I think circumstances may have been quite different - although there were plenty of other boats around at the time, one being Garygee too.

Thankfully the Humber tubes sit nicely on the water at the stern end, which does make getting on the boat a bit easier from the water.

After reading through the RYA stuff I am now pretty keen to do this sea survival course - I hadn't twigged its usefulness until Dave M posted about it on the RYA ticket thread the other day.

-Alex
__________________
Flickr Photos
Youtube Videos
Alex Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 November 2003, 06:10   #8
tue
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Paignton, Devon
Make: Chinook and Viking
Length: 7m +
Engine: 150 Etec + 125 Merc
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 526
being a diver there is always God forbid the chance that a diver may surface unconscious. The need to recover an unconscious (possibly large) adult into the RIB would be a little harder (since he can't climb a ladder). Would somthing like the rescue net work for an unconscious person?
__________________
**Paul**
Brixham BSAC
tue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 November 2003, 06:25   #9
Trade member
 
Andre's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: West Sussex
Boat name: Grey Mist
Make: Parker 800 Baltic
Length: 8m +
Engine: 2xMercury Diesel 170
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 3,457
RIBase
Send a message via Skype™ to Andre
Quote:
Originally posted by tue
being a diver there is always God forbid the chance that a diver may surface unconscious. The need to recover an unconscious (possibly large) adult into the RIB would be a little harder (since he can't climb a ladder). Would somthing like the rescue net work for an unconscious person?

Tue

Like I said earlier a Jason's Cradle will do the job and requires only one person on board to haul in the survivor even if she/he is a very heavy person and wearing a lifejacket.

Obviously this is not a piece of kit one would expect to find on a cruising or leisure rib but on most Fast Rescue ribs specially in the offshore oil industry where this is compulsory. A lot of training centers for Fast Rescue Boats have included Jason's Cradle as part of the programe

Andre
Andre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 November 2003, 08:05   #10
DM
RIBnet supporter
 
Country: UK - England
Boat name: Little Wing
Make: Searider 5.4
Length: 5m +
Engine: Tohatsu 90
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,067
This is a pic of the boarding ladder on a positively dangerous med style boat.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	b10.jpg
Views:	261
Size:	69.6 KB
ID:	3592  
__________________
DM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:03.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.