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Old 04 January 2011, 17:27   #31
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Nothing can replace the real thing! After much practise with fenders, buckets and the like, nothing can replace a person in the water.
When towing friends on a donut, it gives plenty of practice at picking people up, and they are dressed ready to go in anyway. I've also done practise mobs in training sessions where I've had to recover people and dinghies.

Those who can help themselves aren't too bad, but one guy was playing dead and he was flipping hard work! We struggled because the tide kept sweeping his legs under the boat. We passed him around the bow of the boat to the other side, where the tide pushed his legs away from the boat and helped us get him in. Downside to this is that if you let him go, he's going to drift away :O
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Old 05 January 2011, 11:28   #32
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?
To make it easy on you:

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Helps to have a couple of people
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Well, for me, I don't always have 2 people in the boat.
The first part means that having more than one person working the MOB makes the job easier than trying to do it solo.

The second means that while I am often solo on the boat, sometimes I have more than just myself onboard.

Wasn't really that hard, was it?

jky
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Old 05 January 2011, 12:19   #33
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Just incase i ever go over the side and its up to my 10 year old to get me back on board i have a couple of small ex sailing dinghy pully blocks rigged up so he can Parbuckle me back on board
chances are i would be able to get back onboard unaided but after i fell overboard at speed many years ago from a high speed hard boat which resulted in me discolating my right shoulder it now makes me think a bit more about the implications of recovering a incapacitated person with a smaller crew member ,
End of the day you can be the best boat handler on the planet but the m.o.b still needs to be recovered .
Mart.
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Old 05 January 2011, 12:40   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
To make it easy on you:




The first part means that having more than one person working the MOB makes the job easier than trying to do it solo.

The second means that while I am often solo on the boat, sometimes I have more than just myself onboard.

Wasn't really that hard, was it?

jky
Still rather pull them in head first if I was on my own.
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Old 05 January 2011, 15:21   #35
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Those who can help themselves aren't too bad, but one guy was playing dead and he was flipping hard work! We struggled because the tide kept sweeping his legs under the boat. We passed him around the bow of the boat to the other side, where the tide pushed his legs away from the boat and helped us get him in. Downside to this is that if you let him go, he's going to drift away :O
Assuming your casualty has fallen out of a boat that is underway then tide will not make any difference. Its only if your secured to a mooring, pontoon, anchor etc that this problem is going to occur.
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Old 05 January 2011, 16:56   #36
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I said:
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Remember a couple of years ago, someone on here had a video of a RIB crew recovering someone by getting their feet over the tubes, then levering their body up and in by the arms using their butt as a fulcrum.
For those who don't remember the post I was referring to, it can be found here:

http://rib.net/forum/showthread.php?t=17407

And it was pics, not video, sorry.

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Old 06 January 2011, 04:43   #37
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I've always recovered Liz (the only real person available for me to practice on) from the water by using opposing arm and leg-hand inside the knee joint nearest the boat, grab the wrist/hand and roll the torso over the tube.
It's fairly easy for me, but I'm big.
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Old 06 January 2011, 06:35   #38
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I've always recovered Liz (the only real person available for me to practice on) from the water by using opposing arm and leg-hand inside the knee joint nearest the boat, grab the wrist/hand and roll the torso over the tube.
It's fairly easy for me, but I'm big.
Yes, that's how I've done it, but it's hard work, I'm not very big and sometimes have to have two goes at it.

I might try the legs over tubes thing with a wet suited swimmer if I can get a volunteer, just to see if it will work for me.

I have a loop of line attached to the lifelines to act as a foothold too. That helps.
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Old 06 January 2011, 07:18   #39
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These days my back is not up to hauling people into the boat especially if it was someone with the same 'robust' stature as myself. Has anyone thought of using a small lifting block with either a sling or a bit of rope around the victim and dragging them in via A frame or other suitable part of the boat? This should work to get the bulk of their weight out of the water and you can then drag them into the boat without having to lift them too.
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Old 06 January 2011, 10:14   #40
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These days my back is not up to hauling people into the boat especially if it was someone with the same 'robust' stature as myself. Has anyone thought of using a small lifting block with either a sling or a bit of rope around the victim and dragging them in via A frame or other suitable part of the boat? This should work to get the bulk of their weight out of the water and you can then drag them into the boat without having to lift them too.
A parbuckle (I think that's what it's called) i.e. ropes, straps or a sheet of canvas or something, attached to the tubes at one end, then passed under the casualty and the free ends pulled to roll them into the boat, acts like a single pulley block and will halve the effort needed to lift someone. Trouble with A frames is they're a bit close to engines and associated clutter, I think.
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