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Old 30 November 2006, 03:33   #21
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Here are a couple of points that came up for debate during my advanced course:

First even in moderate seas you may only be able to see the MOB 50% of the time because of the waves. So assuming you were travelling at 30 knts when the person went over (and you may not notice they have gone for a while) - do you know how to use the recognised search methods to find them?

Second, if you have inexperienced crew on board and you are the MOB - would you really want a novice to take over the helm and bear down on you with the engine running?

In both cases at which point would someone be expected to get on the VHF & call for help?

Discuss!
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Old 30 November 2006, 04:34   #22
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It isnt just men over board, we have women leaping off the boat on a regular basis. For rescuing casualties that have been vertical in the water for some time I have often wndered whether as a club we should get one of the jason craddle type rescue nets.

The phenomena of blood draining when people are lifted has a proper name but I cant remember it.
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Old 30 November 2006, 05:23   #23
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It isnt just men over board, we have women leaping off the boat on a regular basis. For rescuing casualties that have been vertical in the water for some time I have often wndered whether as a club we should get one of the jason craddle type rescue nets.

The phenomena of blood draining when people are lifted has a proper name but I cant remember it.
Hydrostatic squeeze when in the water causing post immersion collapse when lifted out
Helicopters use a double strop now for this developed I think over in the USA or Canada.

Rescue nets not used by lifeguards get them out and then get them in
But they are operating close to beach and near AED and O2 so differs to a diving operation in relation to how close shore side rescue facilities and Paramedics
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Old 30 November 2006, 06:47   #24
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Just my 0.02p worth. When I did my RYA safety boat cert we spent most of a weekend pulling people out the water, as well as the various bits of kit that they were carrying. Very worth while too.

One point that really struck home was that if the MOB is unable to use their legs (and thus can't help you) it is much easier to get them out of the water back to the boat than if they're facing forwards. However watch their back as you pull them over. On the point of spinal injuries I also learned a really good point. You can alway deflate some of the air from one chamber of the rib to get someone with a suspected spinal injury in MUCH easier - flat in across the water rather than up and over the toob.

I've only had to do a water recovery once for real. Two kids in black inflatable rings , managed to get themselves caught in a rip tide and were being sucked towards the main shipping channel approach to Poole harbour as one of the Condor's was coming in. Their father (stood on the beach) was oblivious to the danger, and it took me to point it out to him. Even then he suggested that the boys could swim back in - fat lot of good that was doing them! My wife and I stowed anchor, launched and pulled them out of the water - just in in time to as Condor was only about 300 yds from us by the time we got the second lad on board.

Fortunately all the safety boat training kicked in and the recovery was simple and uneventful, but why to people insist on letting their kids use those "accident waiting to happen" inflatables. It doesn't seem to matter how many kids get into difficulty, some parents just won't learn . I can assure you that I had a few choice words for the (very grateful) boys father once we'd got them safely back to shore.

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Old 30 November 2006, 08:11   #25
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Second, if you have inexperienced crew on board and you are the MOB - would you really want a novice to take over the helm and bear down on you with the engine running?

If I were Helming I would have the Kill cord attached so hopefully the RIB wouldn't stop too far. If I were letting a novice have a go at helming, I would still have the kill cord attached.
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Old 30 November 2006, 09:12   #26
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The phenomena of blood draining when people are lifted has a proper name but I cant remember it.
Yet it doesn't happen to divers, perhaps the act of actually doing something underwater keeps the blood flowing to were its supposed to be during a long dive.

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Old 30 November 2006, 09:17   #27
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I was going to comment on your first post, but this one'll do quite nicely.

I took a look at the orange netting for just this purpose. I found it to be a) not "tall" enough (as it's supposed to be rigged), b) nowhere near strong enough (though that's a guess), c) tough to join together to form a big enough piece of netting.

I think a coarser weave nylon net would do the trick (as the net in Stoo's post demonstrates, though I'd like it a bit tighter than what they've got.)

I mostly dive off my boat, quite often solo, so the rig has to be manageable by two people minimum (I assume that even if I'm solo, the incapacitated divers buddy will be there.)

Worst case would be to have to recover one unconscious person while solo; in that case, I would figure on getting them attached to the boat, head clear of the water, and scream for help on the VHF.

jky


What I thought of doing was rigging up something like a stretcher with 2 aluminium poles cable tied to the netting. To get someone into the boat you stand on 1 of the poles - pass a rope through the other pole - let the victim float into the net and then roll them in.

The netting/mesh I have seen is more than strong enough.
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Old 30 November 2006, 11:34   #28
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Yet it doesn't happen to divers, perhaps the act of actually doing something underwater keeps the blood flowing to were its supposed to be during a long dive.

Pete
Everything you could ever want to know about Hydrostatic Squeeze and Circum-Rescue Collapse is contained in this book. I highly recommend it, very interested and despite its relatively technical content it is very well written and understandable.

Cheers, WMM
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Old 30 November 2006, 11:51   #29
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Yet it doesn't happen to divers
I always knew Divers were a strange bunch.

Post Immersion Collapse mainly occurs in hypothermic casualties. The hypothermia interferes with the bodies regulatory/compensatory systems which control blood pressure.

When the casualty is immersed, water pressure on the lower limbs maintains an adequate BP. When that pressure is removed, BP drops rapidly causing clinical shock which leads to heart attack. Gravity also has a marked effect on blood distribution throughout the body which is why PIC was common during helicopter winch rescues.

The simple treatment is to lay the casualty flat with the head towards the stern of the boat and raise the legs above chest height.

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Old 30 November 2006, 12:03   #30
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Haven't you used a similar system as the netting to get people back on board?
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