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Old 24 July 2010, 14:44   #1
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Mark Laying

Hello,
I've been asked to help out with some Mark Laying at the Sailing Club.
Although I'll be partnered up with someone experienced, i'd still rather not look like a complete novice.
Does anyone have any tips?
Thanks,
Tom
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Old 24 July 2010, 15:28   #2
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Make sure anchor is attached to mark and rope!

in rough seas pick up mark mid boat, helps to prevent anchoring the boat sea bed!

watch for jelly fish on rope use gloves!

watch for spinning anchors during recovery.

make sure you have enough rope on the mark allow for tide and see condition.

if in high tidal range weigh the rope at the top of mark 4 or 5 feet down to prevent boats catching it. sash weight is good

I remember if it's sailors they are a bit competitive and race officers can be a bit anal when it come to the position if the marks to the wind! some will have you re lay the mark 3 or 4 times.

no profanities on VHF regards what you think of race officer!

S.
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Old 24 July 2010, 16:45   #3
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Thank you, sir.
at the risk of sounding like a complete idiot, when dropping a mark the other day, I dropped the mark, and then took the anchor upwind?
Could anyone explain this technique to me, and perhaps suggest alternatives?
Tom
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Old 24 July 2010, 17:13   #4
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that is the correct way to lay marks, put the buoy out the back and basically tow it till your inthe right place then let the anchor go. But if your with someone experienced dont worry he will help and teach you the way its done in your sailing club. Everyone does it differently.

One tip is when you are recovering the anchor motor slowly towards it so you dont end up having to pull the boat over the anchor. In any chop that is tiring.

My dad is a national race officer and they can be anal about teh positioning and they can also forget to call you on the radio, so keep in contact and ask them where they want it.

have fun, and try and enjoy, without swearing at the race officer over the vhf.
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Old 24 July 2010, 17:15   #5
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Thank you.
Would I be correct in thinking this is "streaming"?
Tom
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Old 24 July 2010, 19:03   #6
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yep, towing the buoy behind you is called streaming, a turn or 2 around a cleat on the transom is ideal for doing this, takes the strain off your arms and is quick to release when your in the right position.

When the Race officer says you are in the right place, remember to try and stem the wind and tide. I have seen quite a few experienced people drift down wind and tide of where they should be, and have to re lay the mark.

These are just the way i do it and have been taught, but as i have said before its done is loads of different ways.

Hope this helps
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Old 25 July 2010, 05:51   #7
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I am national race officer and national judge.

when you are re-locating the mark just a couple of meters, depending on the sea floor (sand, rocks, mud, ...) you can keep the anchor down and pull the anchor over the floor by grabbing the mark. In particular in a current with wind and waves this helps you to not drifting away.

You might want to take a tell tale and a compass with you. Race officers love to learn about wind conditions at marks. Another thing that might be handy is something to sound the depths. Could be a long stick or hand lead.

If you are laying the pin-end (the buoy at the starting line) and are expected to stay there to call boats who are over the line, it is wise to be either anchored in the bearing pin-end/pole on the committee vessel, or have an experienced driver who keeps the vessel in the bearing and a second person observing the line. In this case, if anchored, attach a fender or so to the anchor line. The race officer might want you, on case of a general recall, to pass windward to the fleet with the first substitute, and then you have to rush.

Another thing is wake. Sailors do hate the wake of RIBs passing by too close... Remember that at high speed usually you have less wake.

If you are interested and have time, look into the ISAF race officials manuals, at the end of the page:
http://www.sailing.org/documents/officials-manuals.php

regards
Jan

regards
Jan
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Old 25 July 2010, 06:42   #8
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if you're pin end and anchored go up another 5 degrees and drop anchor that way if they ask you to drop back or pull forward you don't have to re anchor, also ping the committee boat to get a bearing, bit like MOB gives you distance and bearing
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Old 05 August 2011, 05:46   #9
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mark laying

Quote:
Originally Posted by tompaddock View Post
Thank you, sir.
at the risk of sounding like a complete idiot, when dropping a mark the other day, I dropped the mark, and then took the anchor upwind?
Could anyone explain this technique to me, and perhaps suggest alternatives?
Tom
be careful with current - in case you have a noticable current then you should use the angle any anchored ship is making at the time of laying to stream your buoy; this angle is showing the 'compromise' the wind and the current are making on a floating object (yes the compromise should be different between a high on the water committee boat and a buoy but practise with 1-3 knots of current for me were that difference are too small to notice).
For an upwind singe mark it will not make a lot of difference, however when you are building a 'gate' (double downwind mark where as a boat you need to pass between both buoys and round one of them, sailors option port of starboard) it makes a lot of difference and 'yachties' are rather keen on a goot angled gate (90 degrees on the course or the wind (let's leave that discussion for now)) because even 5 degrees 'off' makes a lot of difference for them)

Next to the very good advises/ comments from mr J.S. about wash (PLEASE!) and a compass (the plastimo iris 50 is a good working one in my experience, not sure what he thinks about this) and the ISAF manual he advised, i think that the RYA has an excellent mark laying procedures bookwork which i may have a digital copy somewhere - if you PM me your email adress i can advise you a copy maybe?
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Old 05 August 2011, 08:10   #10
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communication, the key to a good team. Speak to your driver and run through what he/she wants you to do etc.

When pulling up marks, laying them, where good waterproofs but also some you don't mind getting muddy/wet.

I support events and getting on the water early is one thing I am normally the first to do, looks good if you are there waiting.

The last event I did, we had to pump up the 6ft orange inflatables using a foot pump one hour before the start. Only had 4 to do, but in june it was hot!
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