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Old 02 October 2006, 02:30   #11
mdt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BogMonster
so it needs to be deployable from mine or from some crudely rigged barge that I can tow to the spot (maybe a couple of old oil drums or something used for flotation)
you can use an oil drum BUT see when you let the mooring go to the bottom the drum will be popping up double quick.
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Old 02 October 2006, 03:36   #12
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What you really need, if as you say it gets windy, is to make square mould, with a concave bottom (a plastic bag with sand in it will do this) place a some large chain, (liner stuff) criss cross some rods through the chain fill with concrete leaving one link showing above cocrete level, to connect your mooring chain to, don't forget to put a swivel in the line. You must make sure you have plenty of weetabix for breakfast, on the day you want to move it!!!!
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Old 02 October 2006, 05:29   #13
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Swinging mooring - home made?

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Old 02 October 2006, 05:32   #14
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We use the concreate block method near where I live, one issue to remember is to put very large chain in the block. It does not have to go up to far as you will shackle the riser to it. Remember to use a mix that will go off underwater, quick initial cure and wont degrade quickly underwater, fill the mould (half of one of the plastic tanks that are designed to go on pallets are good) on the foreshore at low water. Leave it a few days to cure a bit and then lift it at high water.

Remember you dont want it set up that the boat will dry out ontop of the block as that can get expensive.
Rgds
Jelly
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Old 02 October 2006, 19:52   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jelly
We use the concreate block method near where I live, one issue to remember is to put very large chain in the block. It does not have to go up to far as you will shackle the riser to it. Remember to use a mix that will go off underwater, quick initial cure and wont degrade quickly underwater, fill the mould (half of one of the plastic tanks that are designed to go on pallets are good) on the foreshore at low water. Leave it a few days to cure a bit and then lift it at high water.

Remember you dont want it set up that the boat will dry out ontop of the block as that can get expensive.
Rgds
Jelly
Yes I can imagine it might get expensive!

Where I am thinking of doing it, it is tidal but not drying so no problem there. I need to go and do a bit of surveying with the fishfinder though.

Another idea has materialised today anyway which may make a mooring redundant; I may be able to lease a bit of land fronting onto a nice shelving beach, and build a boat shed there with my own (slightly crude and done on the cheap) slipway so I could open the doors and just drop the boat straight into the water on a cradle, which would be wonderful
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Old 02 October 2006, 19:56   #16
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You've fairly got the boating bug, Stephen.
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Old 02 October 2006, 20:43   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker
You've fairly got the boating bug, Stephen.
Ooooh yes

I don't think the "private boat shed" idea is going to be that expensive though, just need to check on the lease costs for the (currently unoccupied) bit of land .... should find that out tomorrow and will see if it is viable then. It would be wonderful and remove all issues with antifouling, moorings, possibility of damage, possibility of people interfering with the boat, ease of maintenance, everything gone all in one go cos I could just open the doors, roll it into the harbour and off I could go

Note to self: make sure it is big enough for a bigger RIB in due course
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Old 03 October 2006, 08:35   #18
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Obviously I don’t agree with this http://www.themainsail.com/news/arti...98742342696324 well the first few lines anyway.

I suggest a 1/2 ton block, make a mould with ply wood. Mix up the concrete and put 2/3 layers of steel mesh for strength then a steel loop/eye attached to the steel mesh sticking out of the concrete for the chain. Pour in the concrete and allow a week to set before knocking the mould away.

Find the depth of your area you want the boat then add say 5 to 8 meters extra, use all 5/8 chain connected directly to the block eye (No swivel at this point because if the extra chain is on the bottom the swivel will not work efficiently) take the 5/8 chain directly to the main buff say a 90" buff. Then connect the chain via the swivel to the buff using 5/8 s/s shackles. So the buff is shackled at the top of the swivel and the chain is at the bottom.

For the rope that comes to the boat cleat, splice a s/s thimble and shackle that to the top of the swivel so the buff and the boat are the only objects moving around not the chain (creates less wear on chain).

Add a pick up buoy to the cleat rope for easy pickup. Also adding another rope with a s/s thimble and a shackle to the top of the swivel and a carbineer on the other end to the towing eye acts as a back up if the main rope fails, this back up should be a foot or so longer than the main rope.

We seize all our shackles with seizing wire and a cable tie.


A normal cost for our yard to lay a mooring like this would be about £1250.00 - £1500.00.
Not cheep but we have done 10 or so this year like that so obviously people trust experience of a boat yard.

We also drop all the chains to the seabed for the winter and leave a 1"+1/4 rope to the surface plus a small marker buoy this limits wear of the chain through the winter storms.

Hope this helps.
Oviously I dont agree with thishttp://www.themainsail.com/news/arti...98742342696324 well the first few lines anyway.

I suggest a 1/2 ton concret block, make a mould with ply. mix up the cement and put 2/3 layers of steel mesh for strenth then a steel loop/eye attached to the steel mesh sticking out of the concret for the chain. pour in the cement and allow a week to set knock mould away.

Find the depth of your area then add say 5 to 8 meters extra all 5/8 chain connected directly to the block eye (No swivel at this point because if the extra chain is on the bottom the swivel will not work efficiantly) take the 5/8 chain directly to the main buff say a 90" buff. Then connect the chain via the swivel to the buff using 5/8 s/s shackles.

For the rope that comes to the boat cleat, splice a s/s thimble and shackle that to the top of the swivel so the buff and the boat are the only objects moving around not the chain (creates less wear on chain).

add a pick up bouy to the cleat rope for easy pickup. also adding another rope with a s/s thimble and a shackle to the top of the swivel and a crabianer on the other end to the towing eye actes as a back up if the main rope fails, this back up sould be a foot or so longer than the main rope.

We seize all our shackles with seizing wire and a cable tie.


A normal cost for our yard to lay a mooring like this would be about £1250.00 - £1500.00.
not cheep but we have done 10 or so this year like that so oviously people trust our experiance.

We also drop all the chains to the seabed for the winter and leave a 1"+1/4 rope to the surface plus a small marker bouy this limits wear of the chain through the winter storms.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03 October 2006, 09:55   #19
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The only question that your method raises to me is the mix of S/S and galvanised chain in the water.
I have seen this increase the electrolitic corosion, hence I have normally seen galavanised shackles used.
Have you seen this in your home waters ?
Rgds
James
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Old 03 October 2006, 10:02   #20
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Yup I have seen this as well - in record time in our waters!!!
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