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Old 17 January 2013, 08:08   #21
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Perhaps you're stitching too close to the edge or pulling too tightly on the stitches. As you can see from the pictures, I put the stitches in lightly then gently teased them together. I did the tensioning in stages to distribute the load so preventing tearing the fabric edge. The stitches are not meant to be load bearing, they simply draw the cut edges together to allow a patch to be applied.

Perhaps you should enrol for a sewing evening class during these dark winter evenings...
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Old 17 January 2013, 10:58   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker View Post
Perhaps you're stitching too close to the edge or pulling too tightly on the stitches. As you can see from the pictures, I put the stitches in lightly then gently teased them together. I did the tensioning in stages to distribute the load so preventing tearing the fabric edge. The stitches are not meant to be load bearing, they simply draw the cut edges together to allow a patch to be applied.

Perhaps you should enrol for a sewing evening class during these dark winter evenings...
wasn't stitching near the edges and i didn't pull too much, i believe when you inflate to proper pressure after would be more stressful than the power i applied in pulling
if you're doing the stitches just to draw the edges together then an inside patch would do the job and make an extra sealing and add strength to the cut
or you can do 4 stitches just to pull it together instead of all those stitches as the more you do the weaker the bond
for example get a piece of paper and make pin holes from edge to edge, tear it down .... did you get the idea
use a magnifying glass to see how the rubber is applied onto the inner layers its not a one rubber sheet it's more like a very thin stripes pressed together in a zigzag pattern
so the more holes you do along that stripe line the weaker the bond between the rubber fabric
Perhaps you should enrol for a science evening class during these dark winter evenings...
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Old 17 January 2013, 13:17   #23
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When you inflate, the over-patch holds everything in place. No pressure on the stitching, as it's between the two glued hypalon pieces.

The problem is assembly: Assuming you're using a standard 2-part glue, you get one shot at assembly, no repositioning. The stitches hold the tear closed in an orientation that allows you to get the patch on with the greatest chance of having everything lined up. The stitching is not a physical support mechanism in the final assembly, but rather an assembly aid (think of sewing pins holding a seam together while running through a sewing machine.)

jky
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