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Old 11 January 2013, 12:36   #11
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I've seen a hypalon SIB that took a detour through a barbed wire fence (trailer decided to leave the tow vehicle); it was repaired in a *lot* of places using the stitch and patch method. Ended up looking sort of like Frankenstein's monster, but it did hold air.

I suspect you'll have to remove the tube from the hull (I'm assuming you'll need better access to the tear than you have with the hull bond in place), open up a seam with easier access, repair that tear (stitch for strength, patch inside and out), then reglue your access seam and rebond to the hull.

And, if you're going to do all that, you may want to look into replacing either that section of hypalon, or replacing the tube altogether.

jky
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Old 11 January 2013, 14:39   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
I've seen a hypalon SIB that took a detour through a barbed wire fence (trailer decided to leave the tow vehicle); it was repaired in a *lot* of places using the stitch and patch method. Ended up looking sort of like Frankenstein's monster, but it did hold air.

I suspect you'll have to remove the tube from the hull (I'm assuming you'll need better access to the tear than you have with the hull bond in place), open up a seam with easier access, repair that tear (stitch for strength, patch inside and out), then reglue your access seam and rebond to the hull.

And, if you're going to do all that, you may want to look into replacing either that section of hypalon, or replacing the tube altogether.

jky
There's already another cut under it which makes it easier to reach from the inside of the tube, so there's no need for opening a seam to work it from the inside but i'm considering removing the tube from the hull although i believe it can be done without doing so, because if i pulled the tubes to the front it gives me about 3 inch space between the tube and the fiberglass which is enough for preparing but very tricky when applying the glued patch in the right place, after i can use the fiber as a support and press on it with roller from inside
wondering if there is a special way to stitch it or a special thread ? or it's just any stitch to hold it together, i was thinking in using a braided fishing line and do a stitch like the on in the pic below
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Old 11 January 2013, 16:23   #13
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I had to stitch a 10 inch gash in the bow section of my old rib when i crunched into old iron pilings! Doh!
Just used whipping twine & sewed it up (you could use braided fishing line also tho) then glued a luvly big long patch over the damage using bostik 2 part!
Held well & never leaked air, right til I sold it on!
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Old 12 January 2013, 18:55   #14
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I'd go for a standard inthrough the fabric, out through the tear, in through the fabric, repeat type stitch (whatever that's called). Fewer noles, and more fabric between them.

The stitching is to sort of hold the edges somewhere near each other while you get the patches glued on.

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Old 13 January 2013, 03:22   #15
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we NEVER stitch ,always patch on the inside then when cured inflate and patch the outside .for your repair i would use 3 strips of fabric on the inside to make the U shape as they are easier to put on than a big patch , then when inflated put a big covering patch on the outside .it is a very simple repair if you take your time over it
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Old 13 January 2013, 04:30   #16
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The idea of an internal patch fills me with dread. Do you do it while the glue is still soft and you can move things about?
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Old 13 January 2013, 09:23   #17
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glue should never be to soft/wet or it will not bond properly . if you dont position it properly pull it apart and start again ,and again ,and again untill you get it right .if its worth doing do it right
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Old 16 January 2013, 18:41   #18
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A problem I've found when repairing is that if the tear was caused by pressure on the fabric, rather than a clean cut, the fabric may be stretched. If this type of damage is repaired edge to edge then the result will be a bulge on the tube after the repair is completed. To overcome this, as small amount needs to be removed from the damaged edge, equal to the stretching, then the edges can be drawn together by stitching.
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Old 16 January 2013, 19:35   #19
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Quote:
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A problem I've found when repairing is that if the tear was caused by pressure on the fabric, rather than a clean cut, the fabric may be stretched. If this type of damage is repaired edge to edge then the result will be a bulge on the tube after the repair is completed. To overcome this, as small amount needs to be removed from the damaged edge, equal to the stretching, then the edges can be drawn together by stitching.
Thanks for the useful information as I've never read or heard anything about the fabric being stretched if the cut was caused by pressure, will investigate more in my cut and any way i was planing to patch it first with a Tear Aid patch which is kinda like a strong transparent adhesive tape used for temporary emergency repairs, so i can inflate it and make a good profile patch as I'll cover the whole section of the tube, not that big though

Regarding the stitching a lot of people are against doing so and some other recomend doing it but i believe i'm gonna go for it depending only if the inner layer of textile fabric is perpendicular to the stitch but if it's horizontal won't do it
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Old 16 January 2013, 22:18   #20
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***FYI***
Just did a stitching test on a piece of hypalon fabric, it's a D ring fabric which i had to remove to clear the way for the patch
and it was a complete failure, once i pulled, it torn the fabric and pulled the inner textile from the rubber, as i believed earlier the if the stitches is perpendicular to the inner textile it would be better but that didn't make any difference from the strength stand point on the contrary it made more damage as it pulled more textile threads from the fabric
my opinion is if you put any pressure in the future it will damage the edges where the stitches is done
and if it worked with some one before most probably the patch surrounding the cut is whats holding the air inside
also in the future if you had to redo the patch due to age issues you'll find yourself missing a peace of fabric in the edges of the cut
i recommend any one willing to do a stitching job to do that simple test before on another patching fabric and you'll know what i mean
I WON'T Do IT on my beloved Noah's Arch lol
PS the fabric i used in the test is in perfect condition
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