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Old 09 October 2015, 17:16   #1
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MAIB Report - Brixham fatality

The MAIB report on the tragic incident at Brixham at Easter has been released Makes interesting reading with a number of factors contributing to the sad fatality.

I know it was meant to be a short trip, but it drives home to me the need to always carry safety kit including HH VHF and correctly fitting lifejackets / PFDs and may be most importantly why one should have a good knife on your person whilst on the water at all times.
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Old 09 October 2015, 17:32   #2
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I think they missed a trick in the review. Is there a fundamental design flaw in certain PFDs that means all those straps are just asking to get entrapped on something? Yes her PFD was not tight enough, but I couldn't see how being tighter would have meant she couldn't get snagged? It may have made the belts harder to snag but Belt loops etc snag things. I've caught belt loops on trousers on door handles in the house - pretty much the same issue with cleats under a boat swimming out.

Noticeable that lots of the big sailors in PFDs have their rash vest over the top meaning there are no places to get caught?

Knife - interestingly also not mentioned by MAIB!

Radio - yip although probably made no difference in this case as 999 call from shore very soon after. Although 999 call to request to RNLI launch was maybe not as quick as a Mayday from a VHF with a clear location and incident. I suspect thats a case of someone on shore takes a lot more explaining where the incident is and what they've seen. CG want to be sure they are not getting a report of a sailing boat capsizing that will self recover in 20 seconds time etc.

I think there was also a lack of understanding of the conditions they were going out into (sheltered launch location). Almost a case of some training might be worse than no training. Its surprising that you can learn to water ski drive in a day yet PB2 takes 2 days and I didn't need to worry about towing people behind me etc...
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Old 10 October 2015, 05:25   #3
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One of the reasons all our rescue boat crew carry a knife, in case of entrapment, either of ourselves, or of a casualty, whether it be by a PFD strap, or something else, shoe laces etc.
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Old 10 October 2015, 06:54   #4
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I used to sail high performance skiffs with either a crew of two or three. On the 18 footers buoyancy aids were NOT allowed except on inland waters where the water authorities law took precedent.

The reason is that if you get caught under the boat, or worse a sail you can dive down and get out. In big crashes the first thing you do is check where your team mates are.

When we had to wear BAs we would wear a rash vest over to stop them getting snagged. The dressing order was wetsuit, trapeze harness, BA, rash vest so you can get the BA off relatively easily.

Of course this is a deeply sad thread and my commiserations to those involved but we all go to sea for sport or recreation understanding the risks and making novice crews aware of the risks.
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Old 10 October 2015, 07:09   #5
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Woulda, shoulda, coulda.

With more safety kit than a well stocked chandlery onboard, shit still happens. It's a sad fact.

The people involved will never get over this, nuff said.
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Old 10 October 2015, 07:24   #6
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Originally Posted by Mollers View Post
Woulda, shoulda, coulda.

With more safety kit than a well stocked chandlery onboard, shit still happens. It's a sad fact.

The people involved will never get over this, nuff said.
Completely agree Mollers. And the aim would presumably be:

1. avoiding flipping the boat in the first place
2. avoiding your own safety kit trapping you
3. being able to sort your self out if you do get trapped
4. being able to get help as quickly a possible if you need it

...In that order of priority

If I'm ever in the unlucky situation that something did go wrong I'd want to at least be able to assure myself that I'd done all I could to prevent it.
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Old 10 October 2015, 07:33   #7
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Completely agree Mollers. And the aim would presumably be:

1. avoiding flipping the boat in the first place
2. avoiding your own safety kit trapping you
3. being able to sort your self out if you do get trapped
4. being able to get help as quickly a possible if you need it

...In that order of priority

If I'm ever in the unlucky situation that something did go wrong I'd want to at least be able to assure myself that I'd done all I could to prevent it.
You or I probably wouldn't have gotton ourselves in to such a situation. If we had, maybe we could've sorted it. That doesn't mean that a whole different scenario wouldn't catch us out.

In truth, these guys shouldn't have set out that day. The conditions were too much for the boat etc, etc.

I see scary stuff on the water on most busy summer days, owners oblivious to the fact that their one bad landing from killing one of their kids.
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Old 10 October 2015, 07:53   #8
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Originally Posted by ShinyShoe View Post

If I'm ever in the unlucky situation that something did go wrong I'd want to at least be able to assure myself that I'd done all I could to prevent it.
You'd probably better stay locked in the house and die from depression or couch potato driven heart disease then!

Mollers I agree, I think the missed lesson was not vhf, or knives, or kill cords, or rcd compliance, or even life jacket fitting...

...It is looking at how we train people to understand the limits of their craft, and themselves. Possibly using ribs for powerboat training doesn't help that?
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Old 10 October 2015, 07:57   #9
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You or I probably wouldn't have gotton ourselves in to such a situation.
Clearly you've never seen me behind the wheel of a boat!

Quote:
If we had, maybe we could've sorted it. That doesn't mean that a whole different scenario wouldn't catch us out.
Oh I know. But I'd still like to think we can all at least learn from other people's mis-fortune and apply it to our own situation to see if we can reduce risks. So if we have buoyancy aids with bits that can get caught on things and bits on boats that can catch things is there something we can do about it to reduce the risk (Rash vest, spray top, change the cleat to a ring?)

Quote:
I see scary stuff on the water on most busy summer days, owners oblivious to the fact that their one bad landing from killing one of their kids.
And we see it on roads and elsewhere too! Yesterday I saw a guy in a 'jeep' nearly side swipe a car he'd just undertaken as he pulled into the outside lane of the motorway at 70MPH (how they didn't make contact I still don't know - I think I closed my eyes!), then tail gate the car in-front of that with genuinely less than 12inches gap before trying to undertake him when a gap on the inside opened up. It was like watching one of those stolen cars on police camera action but with no police car chasing him. As there was no accident on the road I assume he got away with it all the way home and so will drive the same next time he's out. Its the same with boaters. They take risks and chances and get away with it so carry on in future. I've driven a car pretty stupidly at times in the past (although not as stupid as that guy I don't think!) and got away with it. I've learned as I matured and have seen some messy crashes etc. (Oh and having lined the police/courts/government pockets once or twice!) But even though I think I'm a better driver these days the things that I think will make a difference to me not dying if I crash are far more likely to be improvements in car safety design (airbags, impact protection, crumple zones etc).
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Old 10 October 2015, 08:08   #10
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[QUOTE=ShinyShoe;696709]Clearly you've never seen me behind the wheel of a boat!





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