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Old 09 January 2017, 06:51   #31
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I don't think you'll find many people who've been on an RYA "Sea Survival" course would go out with anything less than a proper 150N LJ.

The "novices" that have caught my attention have been wearing shell-suits and a 10yr old on the back of a jet ski with ordinary day wear in March........less than 20 yards before she fell of into the water at 8 degrees.

I'm sure you're wearing a wet/dry suit when you're windsurfing so you've already mitigated against the effect of cold water shock and have residual buoyancy from that.
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Old 09 January 2017, 08:22   #32
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my old man has done the sea survival course numerous times as he was a marine engineer for 35 years, he's now a full time early retired golfer though i think he had to do it every 5 years to keep his chief engineers ticket up to date....anyways-

when at sea the crew wore life jackets OR a flotation suit on deck doing normal work, if weather dictated it or location (middle of no where, literally) then they would wear suit and 275 jacket but that was a rare occurrence he said.

when i'm out (also big lad over 6ft) i use a 190 life jacket or my flotation suit, never both. part of the reason though is the 190 jacket doesn't fit over the floatation suit and the other is it isn't recommended. if you want to wear a suit and a life jacket you should get a 275 life jacket.

i found this on mullion site- (http://mullion-pfd.com/en/technical/...and-lifejacket)

A floatation garment or buoyancy aid should only be worn on their own, when working close to land and by competent swimmers or where help is close to hand.

A 150 Newton should only be used where light weight clothing is being worn and no heavy tools being carried. It is not recommended to the used with a flotation suit or a dry suit as it is possible that it will not self-right you in conjunction with this type of clothing.

A 275 Newton should be used where heavy weight clothing is being worn or tools are being carried, or when wearing a flotation suit of dry suit.
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Old 09 January 2017, 11:31   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikew4 View Post
Of course.

However, many times, a lifejacket is overkill. Depends what you are doing / where you are going / the conditions.

If you are in and out of the water voluntarily in calm conditions, a buoyancy aid is more than adequate.

If you are crossing the channel, the a life jacket (auto inflate) is likely essential.

etc.
I disagree.

If you were looking at ghastly old fashioned lifejackets there might be an argument to make but with modern LJs being much nicer to wear the only reason not to wear one is if you fully intend to enter the water.

On the inland lifeboat I coxswain we wear buoyancy aids, as we train to enter the water, and use them for swiftwater rescue where a LJ wouldn't work, we'd trigger them every time we entered the water.

On the all weather lifeboat I have started crewing, and in my commercial work, we wear lifejackets all day, they're perfectly comfortable, and give the reassurance that if we enter the water unconscious we will get righted.
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Old 09 January 2017, 17:40   #34
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Originally Posted by mikew4 View Post
Of course.

However, many times, a lifejacket is overkill. Depends what you are doing / where you are going / the conditions.

If you are in and out of the water voluntarily in calm conditions, a buoyancy aid is more than adequate.

If you are crossing the channel, the a life jacket (auto inflate) is likely essential.

etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by markmullen View Post
I disagree.

If you were looking at ghastly old fashioned lifejackets there might be an argument to make but with modern LJs being much nicer to wear the only reason not to wear one is if you fully intend to enter the water.

On the inland lifeboat I coxswain we wear buoyancy aids, as we train to enter the water, and use them for swiftwater rescue where a LJ wouldn't work, we'd trigger them every time we entered the water.

On the all weather lifeboat I have started crewing, and in my commercial work, we wear lifejackets all day, they're perfectly comfortable, and give the reassurance that if we enter the water unconscious we will get righted.

And you have just contradicted yourself, when comparing your post to mine !
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