Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 06 January 2017, 03:39   #11
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
MMSI: 235074042
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,537
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIRPT View Post
I personally wouldn't (& didn't) bother with a 275N version. There's an interesting comment from the RYA in relation to them below:

"The RYA strongly recommends not wearing a 275 lifejacket, as this is very bulky when inflated and will impede you if you are trying to get into a liferaft."

Full article here:

When should I wear a lifejacket? | Up to Speed | e-newsletters | News & Events | RYA

And a useful overview from the RNLI too:

Lifejackets
all you need to know
__________________

__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 04:01   #12
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Waterlooville
Boat name: Tickler
Make: Halmatic P22
Length: 6m +
Engine: Inboard Diesel 140HP
MMSI: 235115642
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 263
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode View Post
That is all great info - thanks!

OK I admit - i weigh 130kg - assume I need the 275N?
We're gonna need a bigger helicopter!

Being of similar proportions and with the associated bulkiness of kit that comes with bigger proportions I'd always gone for the 275N lifejacket.

I'd seen the RYA guidance and accepted that getting into a liferaft would be more difficult with a bigger lifejacket. It's also hampered by boots and wet weather kit as well. Hopefully I'd have the presence of mind to deflate the jacket a bit and if the conditions precluded that, fear would help.

Interestingly I wonder whether the 190N jacket is to accommodate the growing population.
__________________

__________________
GuyC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 07:55   #13
RIBnet admin team
 
willk's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Make: Redbay Boats
Length: 9m +
Engine: 370hp
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,905
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuyC View Post
I'd seen the RYA guidance and accepted that getting into a liferaft would be more difficult with a bigger lifejacket. It's also hampered by boots and wet weather kit as well. Hopefully I'd have the presence of mind to deflate the jacket a bit and if the conditions precluded that, fear would help.
I've always been a bit puzzled by the weight thing - I'd always kinda assumed that the bigger buoyancy was to counteract bulkier (possibly floaty) clothing, rather than to keep a heavier body afloat - after all, we all have approximately neutral buoyancy in the water. I'm still puzzled BTW, not making any statements!!

The RYA advice against 275N jackets is (IMHO) hilarious. If you make it to the raft, the jacket has done it's job well. You'll get in. I wonder how they square this advice with the SOLAS "ferry" lifejackets that are used for Sea Survival courses? They are the biggest, bulkiest things imaginable and EVERYONE makes it into the raft.
__________________
"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?"
.
willk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 08:16   #14
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
MMSI: 235074042
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,537
the key is willk having a desent ladder/access means available on the craft to get back in.
ive been thinking of late ive always got back in my ribs/sibs by holding the lifelines bobing down in the water a couple of times kicking my feet pulling on the lines getting my belly on the tube top and pulling myself in if i had no ladder, but getting older might not be ideal so ive just made a step out of a my transom wheel its low enough to step strait on with my right foot allowing me to cock my leg on top of the cone at the stern whilst pulling on the life lines to climb back in.theres plenty of rope ladders around but the ones ive used tend to push back underneath the hull.
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 08:59   #15
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Length: 5m +
Engine: 135hp Mercury
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 695
Having witnessed how difficult it was for a fit RN air sea rescue winchman to get into my dory over the low transom I fitted one of the folding ladders to the transom in case I ever need to get back in!
My original plan was to use the permatrim on the cavitation plate as a step but the ladder is the easier option.
__________________
paintman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 09:14   #16
RIBnet admin team
 
willk's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Make: Redbay Boats
Length: 9m +
Engine: 370hp
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,905
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
the key is willk having a desent ladder/access means available on the craft to get back in.
Liferafts have boarding ladders. Reboarding your vessel is another topic entirely but worth mentioning that if you have someone on board and you are still struggling to enter the boat, then they can partially deflate a tube to aid recovery.

I always thought that "cocking a leg on a cone" was an extreme way to highlight your ownership...

__________________
"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?"
.
willk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 09:42   #17
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
MMSI: 235074042
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,537
I always thought that "cocking a leg on a cone" was an extreme way to highlight your ownership...

its the old dog i me

not in favour of letting tubes down personnally i boat singlehanded now so reaching the valve would be difficult better just having a ladder of some sort IMO.
liferaft ladders are crap or at least the ones ive been on doing my sea survival
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 10:07   #18
Member
 
chipko's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Make: XS500
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mariner60 Honda2.3
MMSI: 239711398
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 386
We carry on board a Rib-Step to aid re-boarding - as pic. Not really a ladder, more of a step up but very effective.
If motor is switched off, then you can always stand on the av. plate for a leg up.

Life jacket wise I use a 190N (certified 150N) auto which is ok with a dry suit as long you expel as much air as possible after donning. If we're messing around in the bay, in and out of the water, we'll use buoyancy aid/impact vests.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	s-l1600.jpg
Views:	56
Size:	157.2 KB
ID:	117603  
__________________
chipko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 11:01   #19
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Length: 6m +
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 184
What is it that you are doing that warrants a lifejacket? Crossing the channel? Why not use buoyancy aids, which are cheaper and less bulky. Both will keep you afloat. The only difference being that the lifejacket ensures your face is out of the water, in case you are knocked out.
__________________
mikew4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 January 2017, 12:34   #20
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
MMSI: 235074042
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,537
The only difference being that the lifejacket ensures your face is out of the water, in case you are knocked out.

That being the point and the mask stopping you from drinking the ogin when you are the right way up
__________________

__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 19:53.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.