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Old 10 September 2002, 14:05   #1
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Life Jackets

I am interested in gauging everyone's opinion on types of Life jackets. To keep it simple; Foam filled vs self-inflating (gas) vs hand-deployed (gas) ??

I believe children under say, 14 should wear foam-filled, and adults either of the gas operated ones. A friend of mine's wife chucked his (and hers) self-inflating like jackets in the bath for a bit of a wash, suffice to say he was not amused - 32.00 down the drain!

Kids might panic when dumped in the water by accident and might not pull the handle. The self-infalting gas types are a problem as the kids continually want to go for a swim and in some areas around here, because of strong currents, I insist they keep their life-jackets on. They are 8,10 and 12.
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Old 10 September 2002, 14:22   #2
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Charles,

I believe that kids should wear lifejackets that don't inflate at all.

My arguments for this case are the following:

In a bad spill from a rib the responsible adult may well be unconcious or incapacitated

Manual gas inflation depends on the kids not panicking
Any gas inflation can deflate so the kids need to know and remeber how to top up
If you are all in the water then the Adult doesn't need the extra worry of the kids bouyancy

I look forward to hearing other views

regards
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Old 10 September 2002, 14:41   #3
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I'd go with the under fourteens in foam buoyancy jackets as stated in a previous thread for peace of mind. I'd also include in that group crew who are not confident on the water. As for the gas jackets, i unscrew the bottle and make sure the seal is intact, that the firing mechanism works and that the firing pin has not corroded away before every use. Over the top perhaps but it keeps me busy. Also orally inflate the jacket now and again to check for leaks. Personally, I find drowning very embarrasing and have no desire to end up 'suspended' because of a bit of rust.
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Old 10 September 2002, 14:45   #4
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David

Not quite on subject, but where have you got the 8 hp mounted on the SR 5.4?

Cheers

Dan
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Old 11 September 2002, 03:43   #5
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Hi

I would agree that the children should have the 'foam' type ljs. I started off with them because I felt happy that they could not go wrong. However I found mine uncomfortable and a hinderance. Later I brought one of the gas type. I feel much more confident on the water now and a lot more comfortable!

I check it each time I get the boat out.

Keith (there was an earlier thread about this [where is it JK?]) Hart
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Old 11 September 2002, 04:18   #6
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You can search through past posts any time you like using the "search" button on the topright of the screen

Also see the article on lifejackets on the main RIBnet site

I agree on foam lifejackets for children and non-swimmers by the way.

John
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Old 11 September 2002, 05:09   #7
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I have thought long and hard over this subject over the years, and still dont think there is a real set answer.

The advantage of a 'Buoyncy Aid' is that they need no servicing, and do not require the operator to do anything. However, as with any jacket, i they beome ripped or torn they can lose some of their effectiveness. The main problm however with these is that they do not 'self right' the person, as an inflatable jacket is designed to do. If the personis knocked unconscious, or stunned, and is face down, they will remain face down until recovered, or they do something about it - if they can

Inflatables can be a problem if they do not fit very well, and self inflaters can cause some additional difficulties.

Still, that having been said, our choice was for 150N self inflating jackets for the children (10, 12 and 14) - all different sizes and fitted by a friendly chandlery - and for my other half, and a 150N manual inlatable for me. I do sometimes attach the release valve to the kill cord in case I go overboard when the seas are heavy or we are doing high speeds.

There is no right or wrong in this I guess - just personal choice.
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Old 11 September 2002, 10:21   #8
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Dan, 8hp is mounted on an adjustable transom bracket. Bracket has three height positions. The mounting plate was made out of varnished marine ply about 2 inches thick. I cut two circular recesses for the tightening lugs and then cable tie the two lugs together so it never comes loose. The 8hp is short shaft and with the adjustable bracket I can get into really shallow spots. It is also used when trolling as its far more economical than the 115 at tickover.
Graham, Interested how your fix your lifejacket release valve to the killcord. I' d have thought if you went over it would be more likely to rip the mechanism out of the jacket. Thanks Dave.
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Old 11 September 2002, 10:26   #9
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Any chance of a pic david? I never really thought the aux. mounting brackets would stand up to a real thrashing in a choppy sea - is it bolted onto the transom (ie right through with washers inside?).

Used to leave my 6hp on the floor at the back of the RIB, but it's getting knackered bouncing arround so exploring other options.

Thanks again.
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Old 11 September 2002, 10:33   #10
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Dan, yes it is bolted right through the transom with stainless bolts. Will try to borrow a digital camera and do some pics which with my IT skills will be an adventure in itself. Got to go now cos the missus wants to do the hooverin' an we only got one plug point.
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