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Old 20 January 2007, 13:14   #51
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Originally Posted by prairie tuber View Post
As both whiteminiman and I have previously mentioned, if you are ejected from the boat and get entagled in rope, line or webbing, a knife attached to the lifejacket will be most readily accessible.

Let me put it another way; Can you show me a future date in your calendar where you've marked:

"Will be unexpectedly ejected from boat, leg will be entagled in rope while held under fast moving water. Be sure to clip emergency knife to lifejacket immediately prior to setting out. Remove and return to storage box upon return." ?
I alway's make sure my ropes are secured or stowed away so that in the event I ever get unexpectedly ejected from boat leg will not be entangled in rope.
Give me another example of non rescue/ safety boat scenario where I need a knife attached to my lifejacket /PFD.
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Old 20 January 2007, 14:20   #52
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Originally Posted by tim griffin View Post
Can you give me an example other than rescue or safety cover why I need to carry a knife on my lifejacket or pfd.
1. Lobster Pot line round prop and in a big sea

2. A Sailing dinghy capsized close to me once and a girl on board the dinghy had a trapeze harness around her neck, she said i saved her life.

3. Take a look at this for rope round you prop - http://pwllhelilifeboat.co.uk/Photos/12July.jpg

4. Me and Sammo came across a kite surfer 3nm out tangled in is lines once, we had to act quick.

5. Pirates & Sharks (not the ones that run marinas).

I personally think its a vital bit of kit as when on the water as a professional water user you are always a rescue boat.

Jono
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Old 20 January 2007, 14:44   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton View Post
1. Lobster Pot line round prop and in a big sea

2. A Sailing dinghy capsized close to me once and a girl on board the dinghy had a trapeze harness around her neck, she said i saved her life.

3. Take a look at this for rope round you prop - http://pwllhelilifeboat.co.uk/Photos/12July.jpg

4. Me and Sammo came across a kite surfer 3nm out tangled in is lines once, we had to act quick.

5. Pirates & Sharks (not the ones that run marinas).

I personally think its a vital bit of kit as when on the water as a professional water user you are always a rescue boat.

Jono
Jono - I don't think Tim or anyone else was doubting that having a knife on board was important - but does the average person on a rib need one on their PFD or would readily available on the boat not cover 99% of events.
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Old 20 January 2007, 15:10   #54
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Jono - I don't think Tim or anyone else was doubting that having a knife on board was important - but does the average person on a rib need one on their PFD or would readily available on the boat not cover 99% of events.
Assuming you something happens to you 10 times then you have a 1 in 10 chance of being screwed each time (I know the maths don't quite add up here but you get the point). It's about being ready for anything that can happen.

Essentially you are your own first line of response unless there's a rescue boat in attendance constantly.
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Old 20 January 2007, 15:31   #55
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I personally think its a vital bit of kit as when on the water as a professional water user you are always a rescue boat.

Jono
Jono
I carry a leatherman in my pocket and a sharp knife stored on board and for general boating this is ok in my view and if required as a fellow water user always give assistance, as we all should whether amateur or professional.
As a Trainer of Inshore Rescue Boats for the Royal Life Saving Society UK I carry a rescue knife on a belt as opposed to pfd/lifejacket personal choice also a throw bag is attached to same belt.

General boating the former is sufficient for 99% of the boating community in my view.
The latter 100% of the time for rescue work or safety boat coverage .

I don't have a problem with people wanting a good safety knife but dislike people wearing them for the sake of it and the image it projects.

Have you ever been stabbed it hurts, maybe this just reinforces my thoughts on knives they have a purpose but unless you are engaged in rescue or safety work put the knife away.

In giving assistance to another water user I have time to get to my equipment I also carry a set of bolt croppers on board and a stiffneck collar and comprehensive first aid kit totally unnecessary for the average leisure user I know but it is stored on my boat.

With reference to the kite surfer I though the ropes were made of Dyneema (spelling I know ) and that you could not cut it.
Perhaps I will learn more about that at the kite surfing seminar.
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Old 20 January 2007, 15:53   #56
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Hi Tim

Quote:
Originally Posted by tim griffin View Post

General boating the former is sufficient for 99% of the boating community in my view.
The latter 100% of the time for rescue work or safety boat coverage .

I don't have a problem with people wanting a good safety knife but dislike people wearing them for the sake of it and the image it projects.
Totally agree.

Understand about the stabbing thing, I have a friend who's wife was stabbed in Kwik Save by the butcher behind the meat counter, he went to pull the butcher off his wife and got stabbed as well, they both nearly died.

I like these blunt end style sheaf knives, going back to earlier in the thread I too use a leatherman style swiss army marine knife, just find it hard to open with gloves/cold hands etc.

Re Kite Surfing not all lines are Dyneema (Your spelling is correct), I'm currently running 40kg polyester lines on my quadfoil, Dyneema generally Starts at 50kg and runs up to 230kg.

Jono
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Old 20 January 2007, 16:04   #57
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You can cut Dyneema no probs - in fact many of the safety knives claim to cut it in just one pass.

The one thing that always scares me in a RIB is a capsize - most of the time you would be thrown clear but there is a chance you will be underneath. Even well stowed ropes etc could suddenly fall out of lockers etc in such a situation so a knife always to hand would be a good idea.

Talking of cutters etc rather than knives I bought a really clever but wicked device from Lidel a while ago - basically it's a one handed cutter that uses a Stanley knife blade to chop down onto a solid metal block. It is scary how easily it will cut all sorts of things - includiong fingers if not careful. It will slice through very thick rope with hardley any effort and just needs one hand. Dirt cheap as well.
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Old 20 January 2007, 16:10   #58
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You can cut Dyneema no probs - in fact many of the safety knives claim to cut it in just one pass.

The one thing that always scares me in a RIB is a capsize - most of the time you would be thrown clear but there is a chance you will be underneath. Even well stowed ropes etc could suddenly fall out of lockers etc in such a situation so a knife always to hand would be a good idea.
And what sort of knife do you have then Codprawn to bring this thread back on topic.
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Old 20 January 2007, 16:30   #59
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And what sort of knife do you have then Codprawn to bring this thread back on topic.
All sorts - nice and shiny and I have Magpie syndrome!!!

I mainly carry a Gerber rescue knife but not that impreesed with it as it is a folding action which could be a pain in an emergency. I think I will invest in a RYA type rescue knife - much easier in an emergency.

I also usually have a nice folding knife in my pocket which has a whistle built in along with a fire starting steel. Not much use on a boat with 500L of petrol on board but a great knife!!!
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Old 20 January 2007, 16:47   #60
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Looks Good Codders.

I Just Ordered On Of These, 3" blade so shouldnt look like rambo, Not Bad For 7.99
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