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Old 19 January 2007, 05:00   #41
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Originally Posted by whiteminiman View Post
A knife attached to a lifejacket or PFD is there for one purpose, and one purpose only. To save a life.

WMM
Agree so unless involved in rescue or safety cover don't see the point in trying to look like Rambo

I carry a cheap long serrated knife as used in cooking stored on the boat in case anything gets tangled around the prop and a leatherman for every day boating and teaching .

If I am providing safety cover then I have a rescue Knife and bullet throw bag that I wear on a belt .
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Old 19 January 2007, 14:27   #42
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Good gosh. And I thought Canada's gun control laws were insane. Fortunately Canada's gun registry program is about to be dismantled - what a huge waste of money that was!
All our latest laws are insane - Britain is about the only place in the World you can't buy a normal handgun - not even with a licence. That means you can't even practice pistol shooting for the Olympic games!!!

Of course you can still buy a 2500ft lbs shotgun but nobody would dream of being naughty and saw the barrels off.......

They have even banned some types of flares after some idiot at a football match killed someone in the crowd - of course the flare they banned wasn't the same type that kiiled the poor bloke but since when as common sense ever mattered???

It is more than a little ironic that since all these laws have come in there are more people carrying knives than ever - they don't give a damn about the law as the only people who get in trouble are decent people who wouldn't do any harm anyway.
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Old 19 January 2007, 18:40   #43
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hi codders, we are allowed no hand guns here for many years.
Having been in reserve Navy for many years, we used all these weapons.
However much to alarm of my brother I brought my older boys uptown in Orlando where they have Firing ranges and here i taught them to fire .22 hans guns, 9 mm beretta among some others. Great fun.
It does not teach them to be killers as I pointed out to my bro, it is just in addition to their education. I fired these among heavier duty machines, didnt kill anything'''

I believe in having access to training with weapons.

I also believe strongly that if all the Algerian Women and perhaps Sudanese had a AK47 and sufficient rounds, there would alot less raping and pillaging and murdering of their children by forces sometimes of dubious backround.

God! part of this world stinks!!!!
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Old 19 January 2007, 19:16   #44
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Just found this, frighteningly under my bed, had forgotten it was there. It's a Buck knife all the rage in the late '80s but nigh on useless for anything less than mammoth butchery. I'll post a picture of my Kershaw which is a serated lock knife that I ground a lambs foot end onto. Much more sensible and good for man made rope. Went a bit rusty so scoth brited it and splothered divers silicone grease all over it.
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Old 19 January 2007, 19:28   #45
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Personally I am a fan of the Khukuri - now that's what you call a knife!!! Has many uses and is a legitimate tool - great for chopping wood.

Seriously though I reckon any divers knife in or around boats has to be ok.
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Old 19 January 2007, 19:37   #46
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[QUOTE=Simon B;182862] Just found this, frighteningly under my bed, had forgotten it was there.
Ok Simon, I guess you never heard about the Princess and the pea!!!!!!

Why dont you bring her flowers instead?

Looks like someone is playing Rambo!!!
No! means No! Simon
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Old 20 January 2007, 00:29   #47
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Originally Posted by whiteminiman View Post
A knife attached to a lifejacket or PFD is there for one purpose, and one purpose only. To save a life.

Technical Rescue Magazine - http://www.t-rescue.com/ - ran a group test on Rescue knives in either issue 47 or 46. Unfortunately, it's not available online.

The last time I was doing a Swiftwater & Flood Rescue Technician refresher at Holme Pierrepont we did an interesting little exercise that highlighted some of the more popular brands design flaws.

We were simulating a foot entrapment, but rather than the classic "under a rock" scenario, we were using a rope that we tied round one leg to simulate it getting tangled in something under the water. The Tech then had to stabilise their position, locate their knife or shears, locate the rope under the water and release themselves.

Problems with folding blades not opening very easily when you are wearing thick WET gloves, problems with the catches on the sheaths not being easy to operate with thick WET gloves on. The handy clips and loops, clipping and looping themselves onto places that we didn't want them to clip/loop. Some people learnt some very valuable lessons about places to mount the knife on their PFD.... not in a pocket, not in a place where you might stab/slash your face/neck when you take the knife out, in a place that you can easily reach with both hands.

One handed operation is vitally important, and on that basis alone, I will never use a folding blade as my rescue knife. Blunt tips are a good idea around inflatables.
Some excellent information

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Remember though, the more expensive the knife.. the more likely you are to loose it to the river/sea bottom. On that basis, certain rescue experts recommend the TuffCut style of scissors that paramedics use.... they only cost a couple of quid, you can use them with one hand, and they'll cut through pretty much everything, and if you loose them it doesn't matter.

Cheers, WMM
My main reservation about the tuff cut scissors is that the jaws may not be wide enough for larger diameter ropes, and a greater amount of coordination and precision might be needed to get the rope/webbing within the jaws than with a more open blade. Also, how well do the sheaths for these work, particularly for life jacket attachments?

As for losing the knife at the bottom of the lake, that should not happen, since the knife should be tethered to the sheath with an arm's length of small diameter shock cord (see my earlier photos), and the sheath should be securely fastened to the lifejacket.
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Old 20 January 2007, 00:54   #48
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Agree so unless involved in rescue or safety cover don't see the point in trying to look like Rambo

I carry a cheap long serrated knife as used in cooking stored on the boat in case anything gets tangled around the prop and a leatherman for every day boating and teaching .

If I am providing safety cover then I have a rescue Knife and bullet throw bag that I wear on a belt .

I think the point of whiteminiman's statement that;

"A knife attached to a lifejacket or PFD is there for one purpose, and one purpose only. To save a life."

is not limited to operations of rescue or safety cover, but also for self rescue emergencies, which is virtually never a preplanned event. Having a knife stored somewhere on the boat would rather useless if you're overboard for whatever reason. The point of having the knife on your lifejacket or flotation suit is because the knife is much more accessible at that location than on your belt. As for concerns about looking like Rambo, I doubt any of us need to worry about mistaken identity simply because there is a little knife on the front of a bright yellow PFD.

If you are running a small boat of any type (be it RIB, SIB, raft, canoe or kayak) through fast moving water (esp. rapids) I think it is very prudent to have a specialized river knife mounted on your lifejacket.
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Old 20 January 2007, 11:00   #49
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Originally Posted by prairie tuber View Post
I think the point of whiteminiman's statement that;

"A knife attached to a lifejacket or PFD is there for one purpose, and one purpose only. To save a life."

is not limited to operations of rescue or safety cover, but also for self rescue emergencies, which is virtually never a preplanned event. Having a knife stored somewhere on the boat would rather useless if you're overboard for whatever reason. The point of having the knife on your lifejacket or flotation suit is because the knife is much more accessible at that location than on your belt. As for concerns about looking like Rambo, I doubt any of us need to worry about mistaken identity simply because there is a little knife on the front of a bright yellow PFD.

If you are running a small boat of any type (be it RIB, SIB, raft, canoe or kayak) through fast moving water (esp. rapids) I think it is very prudent to have a specialized river knife mounted on your lifejacket.
Can you give me an example other than rescue or safety cover why I need to carry a knife on my lifejacket or pfd.
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Old 20 January 2007, 11:10   #50
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Can you give me an example other than rescue or safety cover why I need to carry a knife on my lifejacket or pfd.
As both whiteminiman and I have previously mentioned, if you are ejected from the boat and get entagled in rope, line or webbing, a knife attached to the lifejacket will be most readily accessible.

Let me put it another way; Can you show me a future date in your calendar where you've marked:

"Will be unexpectedly ejected from boat, leg will be entagled in rope while held under fast moving water. Be sure to clip emergency knife to lifejacket immediately prior to setting out. Remove and return to storage box upon return." ?
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