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Old 02 July 2009, 20:02   #21
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Originally Posted by AndrewH View Post
I'll be sharing this story with the family to illustrate the point - thanks

Hope the swelling is going down and the discomfort easing. Just out of interest did your crew issue a Mayday (or know how to)?
Try to paint me in a sympathetic light in your story!

The discomfort is not easing, but nowhere near the pain before it was wrestled back in. There's a nice X Ray showing the ball of my arm joint lying on the top of my chest somewhere - eeek!

No Mayday call issued, they knew how to, however I thought that if I could get back in the boat then we'd not trouble the airwaves.

All aboard ALWAYS wear jackets, always have done. I'm now wondering if I should switch from manual to auto jackets....
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Old 02 July 2009, 20:26   #22
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Feeling very sore, stupid and contrite.
Hey, it could have been worse... Imagine if you hadn't been looking cool as you went out!

I'm glad you're OK... experience is a great teacher isn't it?

I assume that you didn't have your kill chord on. I know I always use mine when I am alone, but generally don't when I have the Misses with me unless it's superbly lumpy out. Perhaps I'll start to wear it all the time now!
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Old 02 July 2009, 20:39   #23
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I didn't have the kill cord on.

I'm in two minds about whether that actually worked out for me as there were two novices in the boat.

On your own, I think it's a must wear item.
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Old 02 July 2009, 21:00   #24
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99% of the time i agree - killcord pretty essential but there are times when a stopped engine are far worse.

Comming back to lifejackets I always wear mine on a RIB but for people who say you must always wear them on any boat where do you draw the line?

Can't say I have seen many people on bigger motoryachts or ferries wearing them - would probably ruin the suntan...................

I would say it's pretty obvious the right places to wear a lifejacket!!!
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Old 03 July 2009, 01:57   #25
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I'm now wondering if I should switch from manual to auto jackets....
If you can guarantee that you'll be able to inflate the jacket yourself - ie you can guarantee that if you go in the water you will be conscious and not incapacitated by cold-shock or injury - automatic inflation is unecessary. Otherwise, I guess it's a good idea. Of course there are arguments against - being caught underneath an upturned boat for example. I'll go with the greatest likelihood, which is being in the water with the boat still the right way up, or even upturned but with the crew thrown clear.

Quote:
I didn't have the kill cord on.

I'm in two minds about whether that actually worked out for me as there were two novices in the boat.
Not really sure where you're going with this thought, Neil. I would have thought that having novices with you in the boat would be a good reason to be wearing the killcord. I'll go with the greatest likelihood again, and codprawn's 99% is a pretty convincing number for me.

I'm glad you're going to be OK, and I hope the pain doesn't last too long. Thanks for sharing your story
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Old 03 July 2009, 03:27   #26
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Ouch!

I think that it has all been said. Tough luck, I hope you recover quickly, and get back out as soon as you can
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Old 03 July 2009, 03:38   #27
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fair play for owning up. dont beat yourself up over it. you know you did something stupid and sure as hell you wont do it again!!

mend the shoulder and get back out on the water a bit sharpish!!
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Old 03 July 2009, 04:45   #28
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Neild - sympathies on your accident & injury , but glad you walked away to be able learn from it & well done for sharing it so we can all learn from it.

I know how you feell now (ish) as I came out of my ringo at 25knts 2 weeks ago & are still having trouble lying on my left side & using my left arm fully ! - I was wearing an PDF full of nice soft foam to cushion me as I bounced twice off the water ( or so I have been told !).

My watch also came undone but I managed to save it before it fell off my wrist - luckily its insured anyway.

I would go out today or get on the internet & order auto-jackets ASAP. I imagine your pilot mate would have been able to get a mayday out to a very good standard given his pilot training, handling the boat however can take a bit more experiance & can understand your want to be sure that the prop wont finish you off after the 1st round.

I keep a spare kill cord round the wheel so its obvious if needed - but only point it out to what I feel are epxerianced helms - if they aren't they can paddle towards me !

Sounds like you have been a lucky guy - still lesson learned, change / improve a few things and off you go again. I keep a spare kill cord round the wheel so its obvious if needed - but only point it out to what I feel are epxerianced helms - if they aren't they can paddle towards me !

Seems like this a classic ' nice weather ' accident - ie its nice and sunny , calm , What can go wrong ? Maybe why you dont see lifejackets etc being worn as much in hot countrys as you relax in the sun.

As for lifejackets on yachts - still a definate requirement in my view- lots of big hard heavy things swinging around & stuff to hit on your way down - we worry about hitting heads on consoles - think about what you can hit on a boat without big soft tubes all the way round !

Still - to cheer you up - I hade a great night out yeasterday !- Yarmouth a few drinks with mates & then back at 10.30 ish in the dark - wont be long & you'll be back out doing the same . Pete
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Old 03 July 2009, 04:50   #29
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Oh mate, sounds painful. Hope you have a speedy recovery and the best way to learn is to dust yourself off and get back on your bike

Take it easy
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Old 03 July 2009, 04:53   #30
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Originally Posted by neilda View Post
I got thrown out of my RIB today at full tilt - dislocated my shoulder and lost a beautiful watch too...... along with mobile phone.

I'm just out of Portsmouth Hospital (who were superb).

Fortunately I had two smart mates with me who picked me out of the water.

I'm not entirely sure how it happened, we had a superb lunch at the George in Yarmouth, went towards Lymingon and swam off the boat - then headed home at full speed. Found a bit of wake and I made a sharp left hand turn to find more chop - the boat grabbed and out I went.

Entirely my fault. Edited to add, I was standing with one hand on the wheel - looked cool, was foolish in hindsight.

Very tricky to get on a RIB with a dislocated shoulder from the water fully clothed too. Thank God for the lifejacket as I couldn't swim.

I am SUCH a knob.

I think we were in about 2m of water, maybe 3m. If there are divers here, I could give the area and a reward for the watch if anyone fancied having a go...

Feeling very sore, stupid and contrite.
I'm not going to pat you on the back for posting this, youíre not a knob or stupid or any of the other things mentioned. I think this could happen to even the most seasoned ribber due to the unpredictability of waves, it only takes a second to lose your place in the sequence of events (from my experience
No 1) itís bending down to retrieve something on the deck.
No 2) turning and leaning round to talk behind you.

Posting this is the action of sharing an experience with everyone; I doubt anyone here will read these events and think stupid, just how on the ball you need to be all the times, if at speed.

On life Jackets

To me it's a no brainer, irrespective of the boat your on, put a lifejacket on, in my view auto inflate is (as long as they are checked) the way to go because of the lack of bulk, less of an irritation to inexperienced passengers.

On CP's point:

On larger motorboats itís more important to be life jacketed up as the Captain can't be everywhere so can't always see everyone, if someone takes a pee of the back while the engines are running you would be lucky to see him go and you certainly wouldn't hear him. At least on a rib it's obvious when someone leaves.



On the point Stoo made, you were lucky you were looking cool, as your experience grows you'll get to the point were instinctively you'll be sorting your hair as you head for the water, this convinces the mates you decided to do it and they'll come out with you again...

Anyway hope the injury doesnít hold you back with the rib.
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