Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 20 May 2016, 02:14   #1
Member
 
boristhebold's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 7m +
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,538
Incident and lessons learnt

I had an unusual incident on Tuesday, some potential lessons to learn.

I was out on Tuesday, just passed chain ferry leaving Poole Harbour entrance, hit a small wave as water conditions were slightly rough, nothing extreme, proceeding about 20 knots between the swash channel and the training bank just outside poole harbour heading west, engine started to lose power and stopped.

I tried restart, turned over but would not start, opened the rear seat upper to gain access to primer bulb with intention to pump it up incase fuel system issue and spotted the issue immediately. The fuel/water separator filter had fallen off its housing, basically it had broken off. !

Being in not a great position drifting toward rocky training bank I dropped anchor in about 7m of water and called solent coastguard to get them informed of my situation while I considered what to do next. I did not feel comfortable at all as the rib by then had turned sideways to waves and the wave height was picking up making it uncomfortable.

Withing about 10 minutes a large fishing boat the 'John Edward' heading back to Poole stopped to offer assistance, they passed a towing line across, I deflated the bow part of the tube so as not to put too much pressure on tube from towing line going across and they towed me back to poole harbour and got me tied up alongside poole quay. Cobbs Quay marina then came out and towed me back to marina.

On inspection of the fuel/water filter housing I could see where the plastic bit that connects onto the threaded piece which goes into the filter had broken, looked like a bit was missing and another part was also cracked.

I think over the years and various hard knocks the housing had been damaged and was on the way to failure, having just had a service and a new filter fitted I think it just gave up and the first knock was enouth to make it fail.

One thing to point out is before I left the marina that day I did notice that when I tried to prime the fuel line using the bulb it was far more difficult then usuall to get fule pressure, I did have a nagging feeling something wasnt quite right but kind of dismissed it as engine did fire up and I was able to proceed initailly through the harbour.

Some lessons to learn;

1. If you have a nagging feeling about something not feeling right then dont dismiss it, you know your boat and how things feel and its quirks etc, so stop and think more carefully before proceeding.

2. An Anchor is not just for putting down in nice bays, it is also an essential safety device so make sure you have a decent setup of chain and rope and suitable length as you may need to anchor in deeper water to stop you drifting into even more danger if you have a failure. (I have 10 metres of chain and 30 metres of rope)

3. Always test your VHF communications, dont skimp on the setup, you never know when you may need them to work.

4. Perhaps a visual inspection of fuel/water seperator housings etc may be called for from time to time if you have hit the rough stuff hard, Ribs generally take more pounding than most other boats due to the fact we are often in worse weather than other boats maybe because we think they are indestructable or maybe were over confident ? I will be checking mine from time to time,(the plastic housing has been upgraded to a cast aluminium one and I'm making a quick fuel/water seperator bypass setup with a bit of fuel hose, a primer bulb and a couple of connectors just in case)

5. Always go to sea with good karma, help others where you can and when you need help you will probably get it in return.

And finally a huge thanks to the crew of the John Edward who didint hessitate to offer assistance. I located them two days later to say thanks and give them some beer/fuel money, I tried giving them £100 and they refused and only accepted £40. I know many of us moan about fishing pots from time to time (I do) but when you have a personal experience of commercial fishing men helping you your attitude changes considerably.
__________________

__________________
boristhebold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 03:50   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Gillingham
Boat name: Harrys Game
Make: Avon WB 450
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yamaha F50
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 91
Absolutly agree and a timely reminder as I think its human nature to get complacment when everything is going well.Now off to make a check list that I am going to stick to. Regards Jim
__________________

__________________
Man chases women until she catches him.
Harrys Game is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 04:41   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: East Anglia
Boat name: Nimrod II
Make: Aerotec 380
Length: 3m +
Engine: Yamaha 15Hp 2-stroke
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4,978
Funnily enough on my SIB with the new 20hp EFI I thought I'd fit a transom mounted extra filt/sep to ensure the fuel was totally clean going to the injectors. Decided it was a bit over the top and just added an extra potential failure as many were plastic so on a daily inflate setup I worried about the connection bosses breaking from being pulled about and age hardening.

Glad it all worked out OK as a fairly short distance rescue.
__________________
Fenlander is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 05:35   #4
Member
 
Maximus's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Wild West
Boat name: No Boat
Make: No Boat
Length: under 3m
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4,693
Send a message via AIM to Maximus
Thanks for sharing..A timely reminder about complacency,
and your other points are right on.
"The chain is only as strong as the weakest link" was never so true as in Boating scenarios at Sea...even a tiny fault/failure can soon compromise the vessel and even potentially the safety of crew.
Glad it worked out ok.... at least you were in a good location!
I did wonder why you attached a tow line to the Deck,and not to the Bow? and therefor had to deflate the front tubes?...In anything but flat calm this may cause real trouble,especially with an extended tow.
I always have the Bow line/Painter attached and cleated inside the Boat,which takes seconds to deploy without compromising Sea keeping under Tow...IMO a much better option.
__________________
A clever Man learns by his mistakes..
A Wise Man learns by other people's!

The Road to HELL ..is Paved with "Good inventions!"
Maximus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 05:51   #5
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: Tohatsu 30HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11,009
Quote:
Originally Posted by boristhebold View Post
I tried giving them £100 and they refused and only accepted £40.
Sounds like a bargain... ...I seem to recall someone suggested £200 should be the going rate! Shipwreck men
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 07:17   #6
Member
 
jumpinjack's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Derry/Southampton
Boat name: Jumpin Jack
Make: Redbay
Length: 6m +
Engine: Mercury 200 Opti
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 410
Cracking post.
I had an issue on Saturday, fuel filter related too funnily enough. Anchored in the itchen and utilised sea start (my first experience, and very positive it was).
I was offered assistance by two boats whilst waiting. More good people on boats than bad.
__________________
jumpinjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 07:53   #7
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,183
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poly View Post
Sounds like a bargain... ...I seem to recall someone suggested £200 should be the going rate! Shipwreck men

It's called Karma, what goes around comes around😏


Sh1t happens
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unkIVvjZc9Y
Pikey Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 10:24   #8
RIBnet supporter
 
MustRib's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Newcastle
Boat name: Merlin
Make: RB4 Gemini 550
Length: 4m +
Engine: Tohatsu 90C
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,067
Good post Boris... some useful points raised, and a good outcome. Helps when you are boating in a well populated area.
__________________
MustRib is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 16:54   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Waterlooville
Boat name: Tickler
Make: Halmatic P22
Length: 6m +
Engine: Inboard Diesel 140HP
MMSI: 235115642
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 624
RIBase
An interesting comment on deflating your bow tube to be towed. Apologies for the thread hijack but is this a standard 'being towed' method?
__________________
GuyC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 17:06   #10
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: Tohatsu 30HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11,009
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuyC View Post
An interesting comment on deflating your bow tube to be towed. Apologies for the thread hijack but is this a standard 'being towed' method?
No its not.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 May 2016, 17:20   #11
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: north ayrshire
Boat name: charlie girl
Make: reiver 3.8/regal3760
Length: 10m +
Engine: 40hp 2st 2x6lp 315
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,227
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuyC View Post
An interesting comment on deflating your bow tube to be towed. Apologies for the thread hijack but is this a standard 'being towed' method?
I thought the same I assume in the situation he couldn't get to the bow eye to tie off the rope?
Could have been a problem if there was any kind of sea running as it would tend to pull the bow down rather than up and deflating the bow removes buoyancy where it's needed most in a situation like that
I always keep a short painter attached to the bow eye and tie off anchor rope (or tow rope if needed) to the painter the painter being short enough to avoid the prop if it does go overboard but it's enough to not have to hang over the bow to tie off
__________________
beamishken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 May 2016, 01:07   #12
Member
 
beerbelly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: teesside
Make: valiant v570
Length: 5m +
Engine: mercury 100
MMSI: 232012453
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by beamishken View Post
I always keep a short painter attached to the bow eye and tie off anchor rope (or tow rope if needed) to the painter the painter being short enough to avoid the prop if it does go overboard but it's enough to not have to hang over the bow to tie off
I have the same use it when launching recovery ect and just tie it to one of the handles on the tubes when under way
__________________
beerbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 May 2016, 01:18   #13
Member
 
boristhebold's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 7m +
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,538
Yes to clarify it was as someone mentioned, with the sea running the way it was I found it difficult to get to the bow eye and the rope passed to me had a loop already in the end so I tied it round the cleat in the bow which sits near the bow tube on cobras, hence when the fishing boat began to tow me the bow tube was getting a lot of pressure from the rope rubbing it, so simply deflating the bow tube slightly relieved that pressure and let it deform slightly to limit any potential damage from a rope rubbing on tube.
__________________
boristhebold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 May 2016, 01:33   #14
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: Tohatsu 30HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11,009
Boris, no rubber rope guide / fairlead on the cobra? I've seen short sections of lay flat pipe (firehose) used to protect ropes from chaff. Presumably something similar could be carried aboard to protect tubes in future - although it won't deal with the pressure issue, I take it you don't have PRV's?
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 May 2016, 02:49   #15
Member
 
spartacus's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Aberdeenshire
Boat name: Sula
Make: Ribcraft 4.8m
Length: 4m +
Engine: Tohatsu 60hp + aux
MMSI: 235087213
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,696
RIBase
Interesting write-up and glad everything worked out.

Up here on the north-east coast it's not unusual to be at sea all day and not pass another boat. That's exactly the same for the west coast, so I opted to fit an auxilliary engine as a back-up to VHF, etc.

I had a fuel-related issue where the non-genuine Tohatsu fuel connector the connects with main engine caused the problem. The stainless steel connector was siezed and the rubber 'o' ring inside had dislodged cutting off fuel. The engine had been working fine and it suddenly lost all power. Luckily it was calm and we were in no immediate danger, but lots of things go through your mind. Managed to repair at sea and got back to the harbour. Fitted a genuine part, and I inspect the fuel line, filter, primer bulb and connectors regularly.

Regardless of whether the auxilliary engine is used, it's started, flushed, and fuel topped up.

Good point regards the anchor. Definitely something to deploy and allows you to take stock of situation.
__________________
Is that with or without VAT?
spartacus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 May 2016, 04:12   #16
Member
 
Maximus's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Wild West
Boat name: No Boat
Make: No Boat
Length: under 3m
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4,693
Send a message via AIM to Maximus
Quote:
Originally Posted by spartacus View Post
Interesting write-up and glad everything worked out.

Up here on the north-east coast it's not unusual to be at sea all day and not pass another boat. That's exactly the same for the west coast, so I opted to fit an auxilliary engine as a back-up to VHF, etc.

I had a fuel-related issue where the non-genuine Tohatsu fuel connector the connects with main engine caused the problem. The stainless steel connector was siezed and the rubber 'o' ring inside had dislodged cutting off fuel. The engine had been working fine and it suddenly lost all power. Luckily it was calm and we were in no immediate danger, but lots of things go through your mind. Managed to repair at sea and got back to the harbour. Fitted a genuine part, and I inspect the fuel line, filter, primer bulb and connectors regularly.

Regardless of whether the auxilliary engine is used, it's started, flushed, and fuel topped up.

Good point regards the anchor. Definitely something to deploy and allows you to take stock of situation.
In any and all engine failure scenarios a decent well matched (to the Boat) and maintained easily deployed Anchor-Chain-Rope is you're VERY BEST FRIEND!

If you've ever had problems in a Rough Sea Lee Shore with little or no immediate help...you will know this already!
It is IMO worth practising anchor deployment and TESTING the rig you have...BEFORE you need it in an emergencey.
Especially if you do extended solo Cruiseing!
__________________
A clever Man learns by his mistakes..
A Wise Man learns by other people's!

The Road to HELL ..is Paved with "Good inventions!"
Maximus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 May 2016, 11:53   #17
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,401
Having had fuel separator problems on my last rib positioned inside the console (out of sight out of mind) I have stuck mine on the transom on the sib.
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 22 May 2016, 01:58   #18
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: Dominator
Make: SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Yam 85
MMSI: 235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,819
RIBase
Nice write-up, and a good cautionary tale about checking your kit. Thanks for sharing

FYI, Sierra make a stainless fuel/water separator, but they apparently have to be shipped from the USA. I've got one on the Ballistic and I don't think I could break it if I tried. It's not prohibitively expensive either.
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:07.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×