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Old 20 May 2016, 18:20   #11
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Originally Posted by GuyC View Post
An interesting comment on deflating your bow tube to be towed. Apologies for the thread hijack but is this a standard 'being towed' method?
I thought the same I assume in the situation he couldn't get to the bow eye to tie off the rope?
Could have been a problem if there was any kind of sea running as it would tend to pull the bow down rather than up and deflating the bow removes buoyancy where it's needed most in a situation like that
I always keep a short painter attached to the bow eye and tie off anchor rope (or tow rope if needed) to the painter the painter being short enough to avoid the prop if it does go overboard but it's enough to not have to hang over the bow to tie off
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Old 21 May 2016, 02:07   #12
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I always keep a short painter attached to the bow eye and tie off anchor rope (or tow rope if needed) to the painter the painter being short enough to avoid the prop if it does go overboard but it's enough to not have to hang over the bow to tie off
I have the same use it when launching recovery ect and just tie it to one of the handles on the tubes when under way
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Old 21 May 2016, 02:18   #13
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Yes to clarify it was as someone mentioned, with the sea running the way it was I found it difficult to get to the bow eye and the rope passed to me had a loop already in the end so I tied it round the cleat in the bow which sits near the bow tube on cobras, hence when the fishing boat began to tow me the bow tube was getting a lot of pressure from the rope rubbing it, so simply deflating the bow tube slightly relieved that pressure and let it deform slightly to limit any potential damage from a rope rubbing on tube.
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Old 21 May 2016, 02:33   #14
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Boris, no rubber rope guide / fairlead on the cobra? I've seen short sections of lay flat pipe (firehose) used to protect ropes from chaff. Presumably something similar could be carried aboard to protect tubes in future - although it won't deal with the pressure issue, I take it you don't have PRV's?
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Old 21 May 2016, 03:49   #15
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Interesting write-up and glad everything worked out.

Up here on the north-east coast it's not unusual to be at sea all day and not pass another boat. That's exactly the same for the west coast, so I opted to fit an auxilliary engine as a back-up to VHF, etc.

I had a fuel-related issue where the non-genuine Tohatsu fuel connector the connects with main engine caused the problem. The stainless steel connector was siezed and the rubber 'o' ring inside had dislodged cutting off fuel. The engine had been working fine and it suddenly lost all power. Luckily it was calm and we were in no immediate danger, but lots of things go through your mind. Managed to repair at sea and got back to the harbour. Fitted a genuine part, and I inspect the fuel line, filter, primer bulb and connectors regularly.

Regardless of whether the auxilliary engine is used, it's started, flushed, and fuel topped up.

Good point regards the anchor. Definitely something to deploy and allows you to take stock of situation.
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Old 21 May 2016, 05:12   #16
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Originally Posted by spartacus View Post
Interesting write-up and glad everything worked out.

Up here on the north-east coast it's not unusual to be at sea all day and not pass another boat. That's exactly the same for the west coast, so I opted to fit an auxilliary engine as a back-up to VHF, etc.

I had a fuel-related issue where the non-genuine Tohatsu fuel connector the connects with main engine caused the problem. The stainless steel connector was siezed and the rubber 'o' ring inside had dislodged cutting off fuel. The engine had been working fine and it suddenly lost all power. Luckily it was calm and we were in no immediate danger, but lots of things go through your mind. Managed to repair at sea and got back to the harbour. Fitted a genuine part, and I inspect the fuel line, filter, primer bulb and connectors regularly.

Regardless of whether the auxilliary engine is used, it's started, flushed, and fuel topped up.

Good point regards the anchor. Definitely something to deploy and allows you to take stock of situation.
In any and all engine failure scenarios a decent well matched (to the Boat) and maintained easily deployed Anchor-Chain-Rope is you're VERY BEST FRIEND!

If you've ever had problems in a Rough Sea Lee Shore with little or no immediate help...you will know this already!
It is IMO worth practising anchor deployment and TESTING the rig you have...BEFORE you need it in an emergencey.
Especially if you do extended solo Cruiseing!
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Old 21 May 2016, 12:53   #17
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Having had fuel separator problems on my last rib positioned inside the console (out of sight out of mind) I have stuck mine on the transom on the sib.
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Old 22 May 2016, 02:58   #18
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Nice write-up, and a good cautionary tale about checking your kit. Thanks for sharing

FYI, Sierra make a stainless fuel/water separator, but they apparently have to be shipped from the USA. I've got one on the Ballistic and I don't think I could break it if I tried. It's not prohibitively expensive either.
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