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Old 04 September 2008, 10:54   #1
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If you launch using a 4X4..

I have a freelander, I brought it a couple of months ago to make launcing and recovering a bit easier, and it has done, I now stay dry and no rope is needed, atall!

I've used the landy a few times for this task and it's been ok but I am still having a bit of trouble and being new to 4X4's I wasn't sure how far into the water I could go because of the exhaust! It doesn't have a snorkel or a breather and I just need an extra foot so I can reverse straight off of the trailer. I understand that on normal cars it's definately not a good idea to get water in your exhaust/engine but surely land rovers are made for it?

Any help would be great

Thanks
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Old 04 September 2008, 11:07   #2
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water wont go up the exhaust if you keep the engine running, there is a slim chance if the engine stalls it could suck back but thats is a really slim chance, I would be more worried about all the salt water i the brakes and box sections making it all rot away at warp speed!
The maximum wading depth for a defender is around 3 feet without a snorkel, the exhaust will be 2 foot under at this depth! as long as the water doesnt go up the air intake its not a problem.
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Old 04 September 2008, 11:19   #3
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I always give the brakes/alloys/tyres a good wash down after this kind of use so i'm hoping corrosion won't be a problem!

Apart from that it's excactly what I was hoping to hear, thanks
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Old 04 September 2008, 11:24   #4
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Why do you need to put the car in the water at all? Even on a shallow beach launch I have never needed more than the tyres touching the water to launch/recover.
If I had to put the car in that deep I would be looking at some sort of extension bar rather than have the rear of my car in the sea. It really dosn't matter how well you rinse it off there will be some salt water left in the car eating it away.
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Old 04 September 2008, 11:30   #5
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I reverse in so just my rear tyres are in the water, but I do use some steep slipways.

If you do need to go deeper, and have a decent 4x4 that you don't want to rot, I'd agree a longer drawbar or even an extension would be the way I'd go.

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Old 04 September 2008, 11:51   #6
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Originally Posted by doggypaddle View Post
water wont go up the exhaust if you keep the engine running, there is a slim chance if the engine stalls it could suck back but thats is a really slim chance,
Yes and no. Water won't get to the engine, but it will go into the exhaust itself. If the truck is fitted with a silencer near the tip of the exhaust system, you can expect the internals to rust out pretty quickly (salt water + heat) depending on what materials are used (Toyota 4-Runner; internal framework for the silencer disintegrated, leaving about, oh, 20 feet of fiberglass mat packing material free to plug the exhaust tube.)

Not really a big deal; the rest of the tubing and such stands up pretty well, and I don't think there's much risk of salt closing it off, but water definitely gets into the piping.

Brakes are another story. Monitor your rotors pretty closely if you are getting them wet.

jky
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Old 04 September 2008, 12:18   #7
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No one els eout there just lease a pickup truck for 2-3 years, abuse the hell out of it then give it back and start over? Works well for me and my boating activities....

Sometimes, in really shallow conditions The water will not only be past my rear tyres, but a good few feet past the front bumper too! I have no qualms about getting salt all over it so long as its gtiven a good scrub afterwards and brakes are checked by the dealer at service intervals... I've got rust on the chassis, gearbox, rear diff etc etc but not a worry as I'll be replacing it soonish. Seems an economical options for those of us that launch often and can't be bothered ot hang around with ropes/extended draw bars etc - especially when the tides falling fast.
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Old 04 September 2008, 14:17   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doggypaddle View Post
The maximum wading depth for a defender is around 3 feet without a snorkel, the exhaust will be 2 foot under at this depth! as long as the water doesnt go up the air intake its not a problem.
Land Rover's recommended wading depth for a Defender is 20" / 500mm. At 3 feet the exhaust will be one foot under water. I have had occasion to run mine with the exhaust under fresh water, it's not a problem. Salt water will quickly destroy your vehicle, unless you are BritBoater, in which case it will quickly destroy someones else's

Be aware that the commonality between your Freelander and a Defender is the Land Rover Badge and a tendency for dodgy electrics

All in all, I'd put the boat in the water and keep the 4x4 on the slip....
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Old 04 September 2008, 14:22   #9
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Yep - my mate 'volunteers' to use his L200 if we need to launch across mud, sand, etc. He has a 3 year lease and it's still rust free after 2 years.
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Old 04 September 2008, 16:13   #10
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One of the best ways to clean the car off afterwards is with a lawn sprinkler. Just chuck it under the 4x4 and have a few cuppas - much easier than pressure washing and less chance of water being blasted through seals. Its volume that counts not pressure!!!
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