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Old 11 October 2008, 17:23   #51
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funny you should say that...........Yes!!!

After 20+ years ribbing and a few scrapes in my early age days - i vowed to do the very best i could to understand fluid dynamics both in the air and through water..... and having been - and still am, more than a fair weather boater and having had the luxury of Queenie lay on some boats and training for me over the years - I actually think that we - not just me - see my location for clues...!! green and well ard!! can add a lot of value to ribbers that want more out of themselves and their boat that is not currently taught in any syllabus....

Put it this way........
There are those that HAVE had incidents or close calls in a a rib and those that WILL...!

.......Polwart

I'm also one of the Jet Ski Patrol bods for PHC here in Poole, and whilst we have no surf - i 100% agree with your thoughts on PWC shallow water rescue craft - thumbs up from me..!
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Old 11 October 2008, 17:30   #52
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I'm also one of the Jet Ski Patrol bods for PHC here in Poole, and whilst we have no surf - i 100% agree with your thoughts on PWC shallow water rescue craft - thumbs up from me..!
Shame the tossers doing stunts 50 feet out at Baiter don't share the same attitude after the licence enforcement guy has gone home! There's been a few times I've had 'words'...
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Old 11 October 2008, 17:40   #53
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funny you should say that...........Yes!!!

Put it this way........
There are those that HAVE had incidents or close calls in a a rib and those that WILL...!
Agreed! Some learn the hard way and some are just plain DAFT!

I used to work down your way a few years ago craking place for windsurfing
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Old 12 October 2008, 03:42   #54
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Nos,

It wil be different next year...........!! Grin ;-)........!!!
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Old 12 October 2008, 04:51   #55
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Nos,

It wil be different next year...........!! Grin ;-)........!!!
A minelayer might help...

I must down to the sea again
To the lonely sea and the sky
And all I ask is a guided missile
And some fuel to make it fly
And the launcher's kick
And the rocket's scream
And the vapour-trail a-snaking
And the wonderful sound
From over the waves
Of a jetski disintegrating

(nicked from John Mason. WSF forums)
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Old 12 October 2008, 07:00   #56
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Mine are trivial by comparison to some of the above and only a new prop on no 2. cost me a few quid but...

1. Left the boat at a pontoon after putting it into the water, pulled out trailer, back to pontoon. After it has just been running it will always start instantly won't it, so to save getting out of the boat again, cast off lines, jump into boat, start engine. Brrrrrrmphut. Crankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcranknothi ng. Now ten feet from pontoon, strong offshore breeze in a narrow-ish channel, rocky shoreline opposite the pontoon approaching....

Crankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrank nothing. Rocky shoreline now somewhat closer. Oh and there is a jagged old steel shipwreck over there just for good measure. Crankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrankcrank nothing. Anchor or auxiliary? F***! Erm ... bllx ... auxiliary. Started after four of five pulls, stalled as soon as put into gear. F***!! Started first pull, stalled, Started, gear, stalled. Started, gear, stalled. Now about 10 metres from beach.... started, ran on full throttle for about 10 sec, jam into gear, swing around just a few metres from beach and power back to the pontoon.

Lessons learned: do not get into the habit of casting off the pontoon before you start up just to save 30 seconds, just because it "always starts", and make sure the bloody auxiliary starts on the first pull!

2. Recovering onto bunk trailer on rocky beach, boat sticks on the bunks (trailer was a little too far out of the water). Burst of throttle, no movement. Another burst, still no movement. Stupid bloody thing, full throttle BRRRRRRRclankclunkbonkbang. OK, that would be the nearly new prop then

Lesson learned, just because the prop is over a foot from the bottom doesn't stop it from picking up large rocks with 115hp driving it so don't give it too much for too long

3. Out playing a couple of weeks ago in an exceptionally large but benign swell (about 5m at the outer end of Port William, but no wind), spotted something that caught my attention where a previously sandy beach had all been taken away in the storm over the previous week or so. Went in closer for a look, stopped about 50m from the shore as the swell was breaking coming into shallower water and roaring up onto the beach onto the now exposed rocks. A few fair sized crests came under me, up and down, up and down. Something made me look around, oooooh F here's a big one coming, spin round and up over the first (rapidly increasing) crest, then a second even bigger one reared up almost from nowhere, only doing about 5 knots forward speed but almost the whole boat must have been out of the water (I'd love to have seen a photo...) hung in the air for a moment and landed beautifully on the other side, power on and away. The swell crest broke about 10 feet behind me and crashed right up into the grass at the top of the beach. If I'd been ten seconds later turning, or it had caught me side-on, I would probably have been either upside down or parked up in the grass somewhere.

Lessons learned; big swells suddenly get a hell of a lot bigger in shallow water, don't get distracted by sightseeing, and keep an eye out behind you! Also that big swells move faster than small ribs - I was out in the open sea later the same day and several swell crests came under me - and overtook me - when I was doing nearly 30 knots.... I couldn't keep up with them
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Old 12 October 2008, 15:08   #57
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Check here for a slipping anchor mess up of massive proportions see the more photos link for some awsome shots
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Old 12 October 2008, 16:22   #58
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In situations like that the crew are often better off staying on board!!!
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Old 12 October 2008, 17:21   #59
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Check here for a slipping anchor mess up of massive proportions see the more photos link for some awsome shots
Those are some spectacular pics!

Reading through this thread i've come to the conclusion that boats are at their most dangerous when they're sat on their trailers!!
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Old 13 October 2008, 14:50   #60
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Ok, Admission Time

I guess I have done almost anything wrong that I could have done.

Highlights include:

Spending 4 hours on Ryde Sands because I did not check the charts for myself

Getting between a supertanker and a police escort vessel in the Solent in the dark, and receiving a deserved royal bollocking

When acting as a Marshall, approaching a speeding miscreant who was travelling above a statutory speed limit and, I had thought, not seen us. Turns out he had seen us, and at the last moment as I approached he crash stopped and my attempt to drive round his stern and come up alongside him at speed resulted in my bending his A frame

Certainly having the trailer handle rotate at very high speed as boat rolled off trailer and bumped the transom

Getting stuck in a French service station where the exit curve was too sharp for the trailer

However, worse mistake was a couple of weekend's back where I relied on an larger boat much more expertly helmed than ours to support us en route to Weymouth from Yarmouth. A catalogue of problems - first of all the radio started to pack up, then we started finding the sea tough and were going much slower than the bigger boat, then we lost contact with the bigger boat, then we came off a big wave badly, almost vertically, and dumped the stern in the water.

Now we had all the kit we needed, and probably the experience, to overcome the consequences of that mistake. But the boat was full of water. The Opti ran fine, and the elephant's trunk worked. So we were ok, dryish, coping. But no radio. Also very understandably scared son (and Dad!)

Fine, we sort of knew where we were and what the form was. But when the GPS gave up and then the electronic chart, we became a tad less sanguine. Still had motive power, still knew that following the coast was the correct strategy, but the paper chart in the rear pod might have been a million miles away. I was not leaving the helm for a moment, and my son was hanging on for dear life. We also could not reach the mars bars which were under his pod.

When we passed Durdle Door, we knew for sure where we were. As I helmed, gentle persuasion and encouragement got my son to take his phone out from around his neck. Wind was too bad to use inside its wet case, so he had to take it out to use it and make the 999 call. After first being handed to the wrong department ("you in a boat???") he eventually got the support needed.

Establishing we were not in a true Mayday, the Coastguard sent a landrover up on the cliffs to watch for us, and agreed to call us in 20 mins.

Of course, in 20 mins we had not arrived in Weymouth, and, as we found out, the salt water had knackered his phone. But we arrived 10 minutes or so later, to see one of the organisers of the trip on the harbour wall who stood down the 'emergency'. They were 5 minutes away from launching helicopters and life boat.

Lessons:

You have to be totally self sufficient in any serious sea - and that means studying the chart carefully before leaving - relying on anyone else is not enough
A handheld backup radio is ESSENTIAL, not an expensive luxury
Food must be accessible
If electronics fail, even if you have done the trip before, the coastline at 4.30pm on a darkening October afternoon seems unbelievably hostile and alien
You have to have a crew member you can rely on. Though scared my son did everything I asked him to do, or explained calmly why he was unable or too frightened to do it, or why it was plain stupid! And everything he did was carried out calmly and professionally.

We learned loads, and gained a huge respect for the boat and how well it coped. But we also learned about having to cope on our own as still relatively inexpereinced helms.
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