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Old 14 May 2007, 05:30   #1
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Country: UK - England
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hub brake flush kit

Anybody know where i can buy one from?

jb
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Old 14 May 2007, 05:38   #2
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Why not make it up wourself? It is just a load of plastic pie with fittings on the brake back plates?

Alternatively, do what De Graaf do. They drill a hole in the rim and the brake drum! What could be easier?

I think you will find that Indespension do a kit, as do most boat trailer manufacturers.

Good luck!
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Old 14 May 2007, 05:57   #3
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thanks, i think i may go down the DIY route.
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Old 14 May 2007, 06:06   #4
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I think I will end up just drilling a hole in the brake backplate and paintin it to avoid corrosion. But I do have easy access to the back of the hubs.

Good luck!
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Old 14 May 2007, 08:42   #5
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JABS,

We made one up from parts from a Plumbers merchants.

Basically drill a hole in the back plate fit a bulkhead head fitting that has a "fir-tree" type male end to take a piece of non-kink hose pipe from both sides to a tee piece, attach another section of hose with a hoselock fitting on. Mod the section of hose you use for engine muffery and it'll also do as brake flushing. Works very well and takes seconds (the flushing).
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Old 14 May 2007, 08:47   #6
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Simon,

Any chance you could post some pictures that sounds like a good mod.

Have been thinking of something like that since my trailer was serviced and the brakes came out in bits. There are a couple of holes in the back of my drums which I believe are inspection holes. I suppose a piece of pipe stuck in to that with hosepipe connectors run out to the trailer frame where it could be cable tied ready for easy access would be a starting point.
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Old 14 May 2007, 12:12   #7
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Do these do any good?

I rigged a flush kit on my braked trailer last year. After a few cycles I opened it up and found it all as rusty as if never flushed.

Conclusion: fresh water rusts brake parts more slowly but just as much as salt water. No surprise there then as brake components ain't galvanized.

However I'd be interested in hearing if other people have found these worthwhile. I suspect the key may be to fit and use them from new as once saltwater hits the minimal level of corrosion protection on brake parts they'll rust easily everafter whether flushed with fresh water or not.
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Old 15 May 2007, 06:42   #8
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The brake assembly will rust if it remains wet. If you flush it, then drive a decent distance, the heat from the brakes will dry it out. That minimises the problem.

We trailer sail, so we travel at least 300 yards once the trailer has been flushed. We have absolutely smothered the bearligs in grease and I regularly spray WD40 into the hub. I know, oil and brakes don't mix.

The hubs are rusty but the brakes still work.

Another tip, never leave the trailer brake on!

The answer, I firmly believe is that there is no answer!

I did hear of someone who merely removed the entire brake mechanism, but left the cables in place so that all looked well! I can imagine this is a good solution until the DOT investigates a multiple pile up caused by a boat trailer overtaking the tow car!
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