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Old 05 January 2009, 07:03   #1
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How to unscrew old steering wheel

Hello,

My next problem is with steering wheel. I cannot unscrew it. I do not want to brake anything. I have tried use 80% of my force and nothing happened.
Is any trick which I can use ?

Thanks,
zubol
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Old 05 January 2009, 07:07   #2
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If you have got the nut off try some WD40 and let it soak in. Failing that, keep wiggling, (technical term there), it will come off eventually :-)
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Old 05 January 2009, 07:16   #3
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If you have the nut, put it back on but so its not on properly (to protect the thread). Whack it with a rubber/wooden mattet a few times while someone else pulls on the wheel and it might come off. Or try heating the shaft bit with a blow torch. If not get the angle grinder out!
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Old 05 January 2009, 07:18   #4
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We always wind the nut almost off, then using a big hammer and a brass drift give the shaft a couple of hefty whacks, whilst doing this from a seated position on the dash, thighs behind the wheel pushing as hard as you can!
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Old 05 January 2009, 07:45   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim M View Post
If you have the nut, put it back on but so its not on properly (to protect the thread). Whack it with a rubber/wooden mattet a few times while someone else pulls on the wheel and it might come off. Or try heating the shaft bit with a blow torch. If not get the angle grinder out!

Won't heating the shaft make it bigger = tighter on the wheel boss
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Old 05 January 2009, 07:51   #6
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....also keep the nut on a few threads when pulling to stop the wheel smacking your face if it finally shifts......
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Old 05 January 2009, 07:55   #7
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If the boss is in that sort of state what is the steering cable like? they seem to last about 5 years then sieze up. Might just be worth biting the bullet and buying a new kit which comes in a box with everything including a new wheel for about 100. Then as Tim says angle grind it off.


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Old 05 January 2009, 09:44   #8
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Quote:
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Won't heating the shaft make it bigger = tighter on the wheel boss
Yes it will but what you are trying to achieve is to break the bond between the wheel and the shaft then the WD40 or diesel oil (which has good penetrating properties) can do its job.

Is there room to get a three legged puller on and gently apply some pressure whilst the penetrating oil is working.
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Old 05 January 2009, 10:08   #9
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Yes it will but what you are trying to achieve is to break the bond between the wheel and the shaft then the WD40 or diesel oil (which has good penetrating properties) can do its job.

Is there room to get a three legged puller on and gently apply some pressure whilst the penetrating oil is working.
So gentle heat on the hub (boiling water) and a freeze spray on the shaft
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Old 05 January 2009, 10:20   #10
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What ever method you use remember to keep the nut on by a few turns before managing to release the wheel from the column as it is slightly tapered and could easily knock you over. I have just replaced a 1 year old unit and the power of the wheel as it releases is huge and without the nut still in place will do you damage. All the best
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