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Old 01 June 2008, 19:15   #1
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How to leave a beach????

guys, went in to whitecliff bay last thursday so things were a little choppy but wondered what you all think is the best way to leave the beach with the waves crashing around you??? i took on quite a lot of water what ever i did so in the end thought sod it and headed back to portsmouth, not that i could see it.....
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Old 01 June 2008, 20:01   #2
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.... so things were a little choppy but wondered what you all think is the best way to leave the beach with the waves crashing around you??? i took on quite a lot of water what ever i did .....
Best not to end up beached if the waves a unmanageable. It would be easy for the boat to broach, fill with water and you be on the shore side and get crushed as the boat pushes you over.
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Old 02 June 2008, 02:43   #3
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One method:

"Kedging".

Anchor on the seaward side of the surf.

Let yourself into the beach by paying out the anchor warp so the bows of the boat stay pointing into sea/surf.

Leave the beach by reversing the process and then motor away when you have enough water.

Caution:
Efficacy dependent on size of sea, strength of anchor hold etc etc. Beware of quality of seabed in bay, soft sand OK, Pointy rocks not so good for landing the hull on!!!

But it is one way of doing it.

Regards,

Orve.
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Old 02 June 2008, 06:07   #4
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Thanks for the above comments chaps, think it was a bit too big for anything if im honest whatever the method! think i was going to get water on board whatever i did, i'm sure there's a better way though. The breakers were coming up over the bow and then in to the boat and in the end thought that i had to get out of there and chug along and hope that the water would come up with the bilge and the frantic getting the water out of the baot using an old lunch box.......!!!
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Old 02 June 2008, 09:00   #5
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Originally Posted by Orville View Post
One method:

"Kedging".

Anchor on the seaward side of the surf.

Let yourself into the beach by paying out the anchor warp so the bows of the boat stay pointing into sea/surf.

Leave the beach by reversing the process and then motor away when you have enough water.

Caution:
Efficacy dependent on size of sea, strength of anchor hold etc etc. Beware of quality of seabed in bay, soft sand OK, Pointy rocks not so good for landing the hull on!!!

But it is one way of doing it.

Regards,

Orve.
The first time I tried this I was using a 7.5kg folding grapnel - I could pull it through the sand with just one hand - useless!!!
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Old 02 June 2008, 09:42   #6
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
The first time I tried this I was using a 7.5kg folding grapnel - I could pull it through the sand with just one hand - useless!!!
Must admit it wasn't the easiest day out on the water but the boat handled really well and we all made it back in one piece so we could laugh about it in the end....
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Old 02 June 2008, 11:01   #7
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The first time I tried this I was using a 7.5kg folding grapnel - I could pull it through the sand with just one hand - useless!!!
Yes, grapnels are worthless on most any bottom except uneven rock. In sand, they hold about as well as the rode and chain alone (which is not at all.)


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Old 02 June 2008, 17:24   #8
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I agree with everyone who says don't be there in the first place, but if you are you want to be able to get away fast, safe, and under control. I find that the best option is to have everyone but the helm in the water steadying the boat in enough water for it to float (not too deep as each wave will add considerably to the depth and the crew holding the boat should be able to keep their feet). Hold the boat head to the waves with the engine running and wait for a flatter patch of water. When you get the chance, get the crew inboard as quickly as they possibly can and get as much weight forward as you can to hold the bow down into the oncoming waves. Use just enough power to get through/over the waves as they approach without taking air or getting thrown backward.

This works, but it takes a lot of co-ordination and practice. If you think you might need to do it, practice in small stuff until everyone knows what they have to do and can do it first time quickly and efficiently when needed.

You'll take water in anyway, so keep the trunks down, bilge pump running, and clear the rest when you're out past the surf line.

(But just don't go there unless you absolutely have to)
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Old 03 June 2008, 09:09   #9
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Great advice! thanks so much. thats kind of what we did, sort of!!!!!
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