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Old 15 July 2007, 18:09   #121
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I actually agree with that article for new tech engines. It's the recommended method for running in an engine with properly matched pistons/rings to the bore size.
I'd do the old type of 'one size fits all' running in which IS suitable for old tech engines in other specific circumstances though.

In essence Codprawn, you're right BUT there are exceptions. I get the impression you're quite OldSkool about your mechanicals.
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Old 15 July 2007, 18:54   #122
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Yeh, but an ABC motor doesn't have rings and relys on expansion of the piston for a good seal. So they actually machine the pistone slightly oversize and rely on significant wear to bed it in. That's why if you WOT an ABC motor too soon it can damage it.

Disagree about the example of aircraft engines comment. Allowing any engine to warm up before WOT is good practice, regardless of age/condition etc.
And An aircraft engine being run in is very likely to be run at 100% very early in it's life - many aircraft require WOT on takeoff, and typically cruise in the 75% power range as no doubt you know. Hardly babying it to run in.

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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Sorry but I think it's a load of crap for any engine you want to last a long time.

Dragsters use this method of running in - they start up from cold and hammer it almost straight away. Cold engines have much higher compression as the oil is so thick. The difference is the engines only run for a few seconds and then are rebuilt.

There aren't many engines around that rival glow motors for power to weight etc - they STILL advise proper running in.

The best example is to look at piston engine aircraft operating procedures - your life literally depends on your engine and you would never even think of taking off until oil pressure and cylinder head temp were up to spec.

You can damage an engine by being too gentle with it. You can get carbon deposits building up etc. This tends to be a problem with older people driving modern cars who never go over 3,000rpm. As long as an engine is warm and run in it's fine to go the rev limit in every gear!!!
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Old 15 July 2007, 20:26   #123
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Originally Posted by Nos4r2 View Post
I actually agree with that article for new tech engines. It's the recommended method for running in an engine with properly matched pistons/rings to the bore size.
I'd do the old type of 'one size fits all' running in which IS suitable for old tech engines in other specific circumstances though.

In essence Codprawn, you're right BUT there are exceptions. I get the impression you're quite OldSkool about your mechanicals.
No I am not old skool - the engines are!!! There is little really new out there. Take away all the electronics and the engines haven't changed much. 4 valves per cylinder - variable valve timing - multispark - sodium cooled exhaust valves etc etc have all been around for a very long time.

I just fail to get excited by so called "advanced" engineering because it's nearly always been done before.

I was amazed watching the manufacture of the engines used in the massive new container ships. The massive engines would have been quite familiar to IKB!!!
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Old 16 July 2007, 06:48   #124
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Quote:
It's the recommended method for running in an engine with properly matched pistons/rings to the bore size.
I'd do the old type of 'one size fits all' running in which IS suitable for old tech engines in other specific circumstances though.
this don't make much sense, pistons are fitted by what thay are made of, forged needin more room to run cuzz she will grow at temp more than a cast piston.

twice, steel sleeve and rings, heat them up twice and cool, thats as sealed as it gets, crome or Nicasil soon as the piston heats up you are thare.

a dragsta moda takes about 15 seconds to get to temp, in 90 seconds it would be a blob of melted ALU'
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Old 18 July 2007, 10:06   #125
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47 knts

tornado 5.8 135 merc, 21p revolution 4 prop, 100 ltrs 2 men. 47 knts
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Old 18 July 2007, 10:46   #126
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tornado 5.8 135 merc, 21p revolution 4 prop, 100 ltrs 2 men. 47 knts
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Old 22 July 2007, 18:05   #127
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Well took the boat out for a raz between trips today.

Sea state flat-ish.

2 on board, half tanks so about 180lts.

Brought her upto about 5,600 rpm.

GPS speed of 50.6knts.

This was not WOT still a good bit to go.

Cheers
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Old 12 September 2007, 05:00   #128
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Our race RIB managed 84 mph the other day - anyone beat that?

7.4 metres Mercury 2.5 EFI (280 HP) 2 passengers (that's all it'll carry!) Tempest 23 slightly tweaked, modified gearbox, 15" offshore leg, over half fuel (at least 80 litres).
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Old 12 September 2007, 06:07   #129
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Vipermax 6.5
200 OptiMax
21" Laser 2
150 litres fuel
2 people
flat water
48.2 kts
5200 rpm

New 21" mirage plus to test soon
New prop fitted
3 people
200 litres of fuel
calm water
5200 rpm

48.8kts but a little more to come with trim etc(better econ at normal speeds)
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Old 12 September 2007, 06:08   #130
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Our race RIB managed 84 mph the other day - anyone beat that?
Only on the A34 going home
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