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Old 18 December 2011, 20:12   #1
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Hi all. New to ribbing. My idea...

Hi all. I am planning to start doing a few inland lake surveys for my fishing club using a small, nimble rib, electric outboard and gps/ sounder.

I have my eye on a budget model 'Wetline 260 ECO' as money is tight and I dont know how things will pan out. Buy Wetline 260 ECO Dinghy (Slatted Floor) Inflatable Dinghies & Tenders at Marine Megastore Chandlery 15% off orders over 300!*

Can anyone offer advice on this model when coupled to say a 30lb minn kota and a couple of 125Ah leasure batts? I also have access to a little Yammaha Malta 4hp but most fishing lakes frown upon petrol engines for some reason.

What should i look for in a rib for use on mill ponds?

Sorry for the ammaturish questions. I have searched and found little on this model.

All the best, Andy
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Old 19 December 2011, 03:43   #2
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Originally Posted by Dusk View Post
I also have access to a little Yammaha Malta 4hp but most fishing lakes frown upon petrol engines for some reason.

:
Use the malta, ignore the frowns.....
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Old 19 December 2011, 05:18   #3
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Use the malta, ignore the frowns.....

haha - thanks for that. I'm currently admin on another forum so know how they work.

i think I just made my first faux pas...

I take it electric motors = big no no

Thanks for the reply Jizm
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Old 19 December 2011, 05:47   #4
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Dusk,
Welcome to ribnet.

I guess the big question is what lakes you want to survey. If as you say "millponds" then that setup will work fine, (or rowing might work better!) as the electrics are (can someone confirm) infinitely adjustable as to the depth they sit in the water, however if, say you were planning on surveying (and I use this as an exaggerated example) Lake Windermere, you're going to need more than a couple of batteries!

Some food for thought:
- A sounder will draw a fair current. So will an electric outboard. If you go "pure electric" you are going to need some hefty batteries.
- As you have said, some places ban "fuelled" engines
- I am not aware of any recording Sounders - I assume you also have a laptop of some description to combine the depth & positional data - that's going to need power too....
- said assumed laptop will need to be kept in a watertight bag!

Not knowing what lakes etc you are planning on surveying, I would guess for a small "puddle" your proposed setup could work well - Laptop might last 4 hrs or so, and the "car batteries" keep you moving and the sounder alive.

I would think if you were surveing anything bigger than about 1/4 mile in any one direction you might want a "yacht" type outboard - small but with battery charging. Likewise you might also want to up the size of your a little as 260 might seem big in the chandler's showroom, but once you are out there with batteres , kit etc a 2.6 m is going to seem quite small.

There is an argument for a secondhand Avon transom dinghy. They have Ply floors, so you could potentially screw a couple of battens through from below to the ply to (having of course used CSK head screws and CSK'ed the ply floor to take them!) then use as a base for building a "workstation" for the laptop. Nothing to stop you doing that to any other dinghy tho', but you might need to build the ply floor first!


Couple of links for you:
Bathymetrical Survey of the Fresh-Water Lochs of Scotland, 1897-1909 - Maps - National Library of Scotland
Rich gent decided to do exactly this in 18 canteen with a lead line and a wooden rowing boat...... The resulting charts might give you an idea of the different scenarios you might find (e.g vast areas of reeds you could measure the depth with a school ruler)

oops. Lost the other bookmark. Search google for this kind of thing , I found an interesting website talking about the electronic tech and other surveying techniques (like deciding how to drive around to get the best profile of the bottom and not miss interesting features).
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Old 19 December 2011, 05:56   #5
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I would think that one of those (indestructable type plastic) tub style boats might be a better idea than a *very* cheap SIB (you mentioned 'RIB').

Regardless don't buy new - a secondhand boat will get you a lot more for your money.

This sort of thing:

http://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/d...ak-28-PAA40014
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Old 19 December 2011, 06:35   #6
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Thanks both for your input. I see myself surveying small lakes initialy up to say 10 - 20 acres. Anyware bigger and i will charter something bigger.

I will have a carefull read through this again later as i am just on my way out of the house.

What a great resource the Scottish Loch info is. My father lives on Loch Tay. I will direct him to the site. This is just the sort of info i am trying to produce.
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Old 19 December 2011, 06:38   #7
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I suggest a boat of about 9ft in length with a removable hard floor, that way you can pack it up and transport it in a car. The disadvantage is that these type of boats have a soft floor so going aground could cause you problems. There was a small rib - solid floor type of inflatable that I came across at Southampton Boat Show that seemed good value - Wetline.
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Old 19 December 2011, 08:00   #8
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A friend of mine does exactly this type of survey work on sea lochs in a 2.65m airdeck inflatable. However, he uses a 2.5hp petrol motor. I have seen him use an electric motor on small lakes. He uses the whole nine yards, survey wise - DGPS, sounder, laptop, etc.

He gets some very good results.
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Old 25 December 2011, 20:53   #9
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Thanks for your replies folks. Some great stuff. i am closer to buying a boat now. I can borrow a boat from my club for the interim then I might have a better idea of my needs. thanks all
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Old 26 December 2011, 05:37   #10
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I had a waveline 260 dinghy (sold it a month ago) I found it a great wee boat, we used it as a tender with a suzuki 2.2hp 2 stroke. Used it a lot with the kids in the marina too, they loved it.
There isn't a lot of space in them though, work wise, though easy to handle and resilient and pretty quick to inflate/deflate.
I think would be tempted to go for an outboard rather than an electric motor - though I have no experience of the new electric motors.
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