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Old 03 February 2014, 06:09   #31
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For me RIBs are fun, fast and safe craft. Anything that detracts from that, ie by adding more weight, such as an enclosed area, would need to be limited in its impact on those qualities.
Therefore, for me, a cabin construction would need to be lightweight and with a minimum of facilities, whilst enabling trips of 4 to 5 days if needed. So I would need sleeping berths, cooking facilities and loo. Each of these would be basic, eg if privacy for a loo is required a simple curtain would do. A non-gimballed cooker, something very basic, probably more akin to a camping stove, for use only when the days passage was behind you.
For me, the look of the craft also has a huge bearing. One or two makes I could name (but won't) have produced some hideous looking enclosures in the past. The lines of something like Biffs boat are the way I would like to go IF I was looking for a cabin RIB.
As others have said, access to the bow is important; hatch access maybe?
Finally, the cockpit area for those warm sunny days (remember them?) would need a helming position with clear 360 degree view, and one crew seat alongside (Ullmans or Scotseats), sociable seating, and a collapsible table for the G&Ts
All IMHO of course
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Old 03 February 2014, 06:29   #32
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With this and whispers comments being what many would opt for, (me included) why aren't there more ribs that have a front like biffs with two jockeys and a bench behind on the market?
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Old 03 February 2014, 09:18   #33
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Forgot to mention, all to be mounted on a decent hull, with good sea keeping, and not one, for instance, that is prone to hooking
It also seems to me that this is one area where exotic lightweight materials might have a use. Carbon fibre for the cabin roof anyone?
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Old 03 February 2014, 09:20   #34
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Forgot to mention, all to be mounted on a decent hull, with good sea keeping, and not one, for instance, that is prone to hooking
And under 20k lol
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Old 03 February 2014, 09:23   #35
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And under 20k lol
I suspect that keeping the VAT under 20k will be a struggle...
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Old 03 February 2014, 09:27   #36
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I think 2 boats is the answer.

I have Sophie II with v berths, quarter berths, saloon, galley, heads, and a nice cockpit for when the sun is out.

And I have Tigga the SR4 for blasting around and wave jumping.

Both are very good at what they do with no compromises.
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Old 03 February 2014, 10:35   #37
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I love this AMF cabin rib from NZ. It just looks right. 9m though.

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Old 03 February 2014, 15:11   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian M View Post
For me RIBs are fun, fast and safe craft. Anything that detracts from that, ie by adding more weight, such as an enclosed area, would need to be limited in its impact on those qualities.
Therefore, for me, a cabin construction would need to be lightweight and with a minimum of facilities, whilst enabling trips of 4 to 5 days if needed. So I would need sleeping berths, cooking facilities and loo. Each of these would be basic, eg if privacy for a loo is required a simple curtain would do. A non-gimballed cooker, something very basic, probably more akin to a camping stove, for use only when the days passage was behind you.
For me, the look of the craft also has a huge bearing. One or two makes I could name (but won't) have produced some hideous looking enclosures in the past. The lines of something like Biffs boat are the way I would like to go IF I was looking for a cabin RIB.
As others have said, access to the bow is important; hatch access maybe?
Finally, the cockpit area for those warm sunny days (remember them?) would need a helming position with clear 360 degree view, and one crew seat alongside (Ullmans or Scotseats), sociable seating, and a collapsible table for the G&Ts
All IMHO of course
Interestingly, and this is probably why there is no universally popular cabin rib concept, I would say almost the complete opposite!

If you are going to have the expense (and compromises) that a cabin entails then I want it to enable me to use the boat in the widest weather - function over form; comfortable "indoor" seating for all the normal crew. Cheaper Kab seats can be used as don't need to be as water proof. I'm not too fussed about G&Ts but a chart table for planning (cabin ribs go further?). I don't need berths/beds - if I can afford a cabin and the running costs of that size of rib I can afford a B&B with luxury/comfort. Storage for wet kit (in a locker that drains and is well ventilated) - one of the advantages in not sitting in oilies/dry suit all day - but you might need that to work on deck, the tender etc.

An electric windlass might be preferable to a front hatch - I suspect front hatches are vulnerable in a big stuff? If you do only have access along top of tubes then yachty lifelines to clip-on to might be nice.

A small fridge and stove would be nice, although even an electric kettle might be feasible with the engine running(?) which would cover 95% of needs - without the hassle of fuel/fire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HUMBER P4VWL View Post
With this and whispers comments being what many would opt for, (me included) why aren't there more ribs that have a front like biffs with two jockeys and a bench behind on the market?
I'd guess that if you have that level of budget you may get drawn towards alternatives. That arrangement suits some people - but once you start getting into those sort of purchases I expect wives to have more impact on purchases and small spartan "GRP tents" are probably not what most wives with 100k to spend on a boat are aspiring to.

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I think 2 boats is the answer.
A tender could be very useful anyway - so perhaps a nice way to carry a largish tender is a good solution?
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Old 03 February 2014, 15:35   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poly View Post
Interestingly, and this is probably why there is no universally popular cabin rib concept, I would say almost the complete opposite!

If you are going to have the expense (and compromises) that a cabin entails then I want it to enable me to use the boat in the widest weather - function over form; comfortable "indoor" seating for all the normal crew. Cheaper Kab seats can be used as don't need to be as water proof. I'm not too fussed about G&Ts but a chart table for planning (cabin ribs go further?). I don't need berths/beds - if I can afford a cabin and the running costs of that size of rib I can afford a B&B with luxury/comfort. Storage for wet kit (in a locker that drains and is well ventilated) - one of the advantages in not sitting in oilies/dry suit all day - but you might need that to work on deck, the tender etc.

An electric windlass might be preferable to a front hatch - I suspect front hatches are vulnerable in a big stuff? If you do only have access along top of tubes then yachty lifelines to clip-on to might be nice.

A small fridge and stove would be nice, although even an electric kettle might be feasible with the engine running(?) which would cover 95% of needs - without the hassle of fuel/fire.

I'd guess that if you have that level of budget you may get drawn towards alternatives. That arrangement suits some people - but once you start getting into those sort of purchases I expect wives to have more impact on purchases and small spartan "GRP tents" are probably not what most wives with 100k to spend on a boat are aspiring to.


A tender could be very useful anyway - so perhaps a nice way to carry a largish tender is a good solution?
OK, I've risen to the bait , and I can already feel my tail on fire, but here goes
I think that what you are describing as a format is available in any number of hard boats. Maybe I am just too grass roots, (read poor ) but I believe that RIBs are essentially a small boat concept; from what I have seen and read tubes become less and less relevant, serving less of a useful purpose as hull size increases. I am thinking well over 10m though.
So, to my mind, the art of cabin RIB design is to maintain enough of the positives of sporting performance and safety within a 'compact' waterline.
Putting tubes on a gin palace does not make a RIB.
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Old 03 February 2014, 15:44   #40
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So, to my mind, the art of cabin RIB design is to maintain enough of the positives of sporting performance and safety within a 'compact' waterline.
Like I used to have then. :-)
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