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Old 25 February 2012, 16:13   #11
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try boiling water ,,at least your not going to burn a hole in it if your unsure with a blow lamp and it all falls in a pool of molten ali on the floor .
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Old 25 February 2012, 16:42   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribochet View Post

If you need any pictures let me know
If its not too much hassle some photos so we know what we are dealing with would be fantastic.

thanks
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Old 25 February 2012, 18:44   #13
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I would drill a 5mm pilot hole and then use as big a screw extractor as you can. Using heat is a very drastic measure on alu as it cause damage easily if you are not careful.
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Old 25 February 2012, 18:56   #14
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Have a look here http://www.markthewelder.co.uk/id69.html
http://www.madelectrical.com/worksho...en-bolts.shtml
I would go for the 1st method I have been drilling stainless today it's fooking hard you will need some good drills.
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Old 25 February 2012, 19:19   #15
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assuming you can drill it you can also buy stud extractors

http://www.outdooraddict.co.uk/silve...r-remover.html

site is used as example of - basically drill small hole and then screw this in and in theory should remove the stud...

S.
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Old 25 February 2012, 21:06   #16
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Do not try to drill the remains and use easyout type extractors. If the bolt is so seized that it has snapped, there is no way a skinny, brittle extractor is going to wind it out. Trust me on this.
Use a centre punch and tap the end of the stud and also tap around the lower unit in the area of the stud to break the seize to the lower unit, you should be able to work the lower unit off by tapping and working it by rocking. Once free you can probably whack the end of the bolt pretty firmly and crack the seize then withdraw it using a stud extractor. You can apply heat and that is good. If you can do the welding of a nut onto the bolt remains that is a good option too. The temperature at the weld will be in the region of 1400 degrees celcius and it will free the seize.
Contrary to popular belief, you can safely apply heat to the aluminium because it is a very good conductor of head and dissipates it quickly. You are unlikely to melt it unless you are using oxy-acetylene and even then you'd need to be applying it to an edge or lingering far too long in one place. If you use heat and want an indication of the temperature, rub some soap onto the metal and it will turn dark brown shortly before melting occurs. It sounds mickey mouse but that is standard practice for annealing aluminium to discern when it is up to temperature.
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Old 26 February 2012, 00:07   #17
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Do not try to drill the remains and use easyout type extractors. If the bolt is so seized that it has snapped, there is no way a skinny, brittle extractor is going to wind it out. Trust me on this.
Use a centre punch and tap the end of the stud and also tap around the lower unit in the area of the stud to break the seize to the lower unit, you should be able to work the lower unit off by tapping and working it by rocking. Once free you can probably whack the end of the bolt pretty firmly and crack the seize then withdraw it using a stud extractor. You can apply heat and that is good. If you can do the welding of a nut onto the bolt remains that is a good option too. The temperature at the weld will be in the region of 1400 degrees celcius and it will free the seize.
Contrary to popular belief, you can safely apply heat to the aluminium because it is a very good conductor of head and dissipates it quickly. You are unlikely to melt it unless you are using oxy-acetylene and even then you'd need to be applying it to an edge or lingering far too long in one place. If you use heat and want an indication of the temperature, rub some soap onto the metal and it will turn dark brown shortly before melting occurs. It sounds mickey mouse but that is standard practice for annealing aluminium to discern when it is up to temperature.
I was about to start typing almost the same reply when I saw yours...
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Old 26 February 2012, 05:01   #18
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Jeezo....... Get a battery drill. Put a 1mm drill bit in it and drill out the corrosion! After you have drilled as many holes as possible around this "stud" you will find you have released enough grip your gearbox will come off easier than expected. You cannot drill the stud out with a bigger drill as the propshaft will get in your way. HTH
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Old 26 February 2012, 05:59   #19
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Just as well I'm back from my skiing. A welder could drop a nut on top of that bit of stud and puddle weld inside. The heat from the welding will expand the Ali. Once the nuts in place give it a solid wack with a hammer to shock it and then undo it.
If it snaps off again then drill through the centre of the stud with ever growing sizes of drills. Use cutting fluid.if you're slightly off centre you will come to the edge of stud then it will loosen up enough to turn what is left. Don't be tempted to drill further than that.
Above all don't break the drill bit in it. Start with about 3mm and work up from there. Once the first hole is done the rest will be easier. Just go steady. The drilling bit should take about half hour to an hour to do it nice and steady. The welding bit would take me ten mins most
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Old 26 February 2012, 08:12   #20
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Guys,

Thanks for this. All this is a bit beyond my skill and tool sets but at least i know what my options are and for that I am grateful.

One thing I have found on the web looking for solutions is a suggestion that the drive shaft splines may have rusted to the powerhead. (That will teach me to go looking!)

Is this likely? Are the symptoms of zero movement(<1mm up down, forwards backwards and side to side) at the joint between the lower unit and center section more symptomatic of one than the other? Is there a way to tell one way or the other from this position?

Assuming I have now reached wallet out time any recommendations in the Manchester / North West area?

Cheers

John
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