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Old 22 October 2016, 10:38   #1
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fuel tanks

I thought that I would open a separate thread rather than side track the spare fuel can thread. I have a 6.5m ribtec that has 2 fuel tanks in the floor each with a capacity of 150 litres. I have a 3 way valve beside the fuel filter and I can easily change between tanks as needed . I have always found this an excellent option as I never have to carry additional tanks on long cruises. I wonder why more rib manufacturers do not incorporate additional tanks in the floor. The space is there for it so it would do away with trying to secure additional tanks around the deck or within seating.
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Old 22 October 2016, 11:43   #2
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Possibly down to cost and potential warranty issues the more simple the boat the less to go wrong and the cheaper it is to manufacture
Not much to go wrong with a 25l outboard tank on the deck
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Old 22 October 2016, 17:15   #3
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I thought that I would open a separate thread rather than side track the spare fuel can thread. I have a 6.5m ribtec that has 2 fuel tanks in the floor each with a capacity of 150 litres. I have a 3 way valve beside the fuel filter and I can easily change between tanks as needed . I have always found this an excellent option as I never have to carry additional tanks on long cruises. I wonder why more rib manufacturers do not incorporate additional tanks in the floor. The space is there for it so it would do away with trying to secure additional tanks around the deck or within seating.
And when (not if) one of them starts leaking you'll be left with the dilemma, after butchering the deck to get at them, do I replace the one tank that's leaking or do I replace them both. (probably no option to go to one tank because of the under deck layout).....every silver lining has a cloud.
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Old 23 October 2016, 05:12   #4
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And when (not if) one of them starts leaking
I'm sure you've had a bad run of luck with tanks. I've seen you post variations on this theme - that ALL steel tanks fail eventually. I suppose taken literally, it would be true - everything fails eventually - just as the hull will too. So I'm interested in the timescale you have in mind? 5 - 10 - 15 years? I know LOTS of 15 yo RIBS that are on their original tanks and only two that aren't. One was very badly abused and I have no history on the other. So maybe you're thinking of older craft?

To the OP:

300L is a HUGE amount of fuel in a 6.5m RIB - way more than most users would require or wish to pay for building storage for! The long range tank in a 7.4m Stormforce is 300L ! It sounds like a special order in a Ribtec - maybe for a "Round Somewhere" style trip? The upside is you will NEVER run out of fuel, so long as you don't get complacent about refilling. The downside is that you have a lot of fuel aging below deck. Fuel that you have to get on the plane every time you pull away. Fuel that your engine is running a little harder to carry about. Unless you part fill them?


P.S. Hello from a bit further North East...
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Old 23 October 2016, 05:33   #5
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Large tanks built in are great if you need them. Even better is separate or multiple tanks that can be isolated in the event of damage or contamination

The down side with manufactures filling every space with tanks is, if they fail or if they get filled with stuff they shouldn't it could then potentially be a drama to rectify, unless they have easy drain and cleaning facilities. My job is fixing things and when manufactures make any item without a way to service it, because it's" maintenance free" I can guarantee it will be harder to fix later.

The other down side to big tanks is the storage of lots of fuel which degrades and could collect condensation, and closer to my interest is weight Each litre of fuel ways approx 1kg. That's more weight to drag, and more importantly less speed. My mates 25ft boat gained nearly 20mph by loosing weight. He weighed all 600kg he removed on his wife's bathroom scales too
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Old 23 October 2016, 06:59   #6
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...and closer to my interest is weight Each litre of fuel ways approx 1kg. That's more weight to drag, and more importantly less speed. My mates 25ft boat gained nearly 20mph by loosing weight. He weighed all 600kg he removed on his wife's bathroom scales too
Petrol is around 0.75kg/L - diesel closer to 0.85kg/L

I'm absolutely with you on the excess weights. I handball EVERYTHING out of the boat over the winter and reload in the spring - it's amazing what builds up. I'm guessing your mates boat wouldn't plane with the 600kg on there?
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Old 23 October 2016, 08:48   #7
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I'm sure you've had a bad run of luck with tanks. I've seen you post variations on this theme - that ALL steel tanks fail eventually. I suppose taken literally, it would be true - everything fails eventually - just as the hull will too. So I'm interested in the timescale you have in mind? 5 - 10 - 15 years? I know LOTS of 15 yo RIBS that are on their original tanks and only two that aren't. One was very badly abused and I have no history on the other. So maybe you're thinking of older craft?
I certainly have a bit of a jaded view about fuel tanks, not least because I fell off the boat, broke my arm and knocked my front teeth out when I was changing my tank last year. Mines was 15yrs old, the Ribeye was 9yrs old. My Fairline probably about 15 years old, Two Tremletts the same. I have had two Searays that were 20years old and still "ok" in so much as they weren't leaking but their appearance gave cause for concern. (Both aluminium tanks).
I don't count portable tanks because of the abuse I gave them but it would be interesting to poll the subject and find out others experiences.
Interestingly in both my own Coastine and the Ribeye there was no evidence of corrosion being a factor.
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Old 23 October 2016, 15:58   #8
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Petrol is around 0.75kg/L - diesel closer to 0.85kg/L

I'm absolutely with you on the excess weights. I handball EVERYTHING out of the boat over the winter and reload in the spring - it's amazing what builds up. I'm guessing your mates boat wouldn't plane with the 600kg on there?
The boat did 45 ishmph before the diet... despite the v8 block
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Old 23 October 2016, 16:21   #9
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The boat did 45 ishmph before the diet... despite the v8 block
600kg is a lot of cr@p !
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Old 24 October 2016, 06:03   #10
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And when (not if) one of them starts leaking you'll be left with the dilemma, after butchering the deck to get at them, do I replace the one tank that's leaking or do I replace them both. (probably no option to go to one tank because of the under deck layout).....every silver lining has a cloud.
My boat is approx 1999 and the only problems I had so far was that the fuel senders corroded which I replaced. I did have to drill an inspection hatch into the back tank to remove parts of the old sender that was blocking the fuel pipe. I would imagine that if 1 of the tanks gave trouble then I would remove it to see what the problem was. I would not remove a good tank unnecessarily.
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