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Old 09 December 2009, 01:51   #1
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Fuel Tank - What Options

As many of you know we need to get new fuel tanks for our RIB - so couple of questions

1. Would we be better off getting one 91lit tank at the rear and carry a spare 30lit(we already have this) at the front - or is this going to be far too heavy for our little Searider when full of fuel

2. Getting two 40 lit tanks for fitting at the rear

The current set up is with 2 x 40litres but they take up a lot of room, look untidy and hard to fix to the deck securely - I thought the 91lit tank would be a simple replacement option and look neater, but worried I might have overlooked other issues with a larger tank

Finally what's a good price - have seen a 91lit on eBay for 124 plus postage (MarineScene) - are there any specific "makes" to avoid?

TQ

J
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Old 09 December 2009, 04:02   #2
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Call me paranoid, but I like >1 tank in case the working tank gets poisoned / broken. Yes, there's the small hassle of having to swap hoses every 30L, but I can live with that for the extra security. Also means if you are paranoid about old fuel, you can rotate usage to keep it fresh. (and also easier to refuel if you end up cruiising to somewhere the garage is a 30 Yd walk up the road!)

If you got a 30L up front already, You could park a couple of 30 / 40L tanks between the transom braces (2 x 30L Hulks wedge in nicely on an SR4, so I guess a couple of 40L ones might work OK on a 5.4?) The trick with that is to have a short (like 6" - just enough to be b able to grip) stub toob with inline connector on the tanks then a "priming jump lead" that you can swap form tank to tank - reduces the amount of meandering hose rattling around on deck)
If you are really feeling adventurous, run an installed fuel line forward,with a short tail by the engine. and then swapping to the front tank becomes a simple case of moving a connector across, rather than lugging a 30l tank down the boat, which I guarantee will need to be done at the lumpiest part of the trip......

If you think that might be the way you want to go, shout, as there's a couple of small design features which will result in a lot fewer four letter words being muttered.... But donlt want to bore you with them if you go for a big single one.
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Old 09 December 2009, 05:23   #3
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Hi Jean,

From what you have described in previous posts would it not be a cheaper option to replace the hardware on your existing tanks?
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Old 09 December 2009, 06:35   #4
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Have you thought about Barrus tanks,Chewy has some for sale on Bits and Pieces site for a good price.I have two fitted under the consol and another as a spare.Barrus tanks were original spec.on M.o.D.Seariders.
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Old 09 December 2009, 06:55   #5
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My train of thought is:

If you want one BIG tank then have it built into the console and mounted at a mid point to even out the weight. By mounting it this way you will minimise water contamination as you'll be installing it as a permamant tank. This way you can still carry spare tanks if you want the extra cruising range but have a larger cruising range by the nature of the larger tank anyway. The disadvantage is that it can be invasive to fit and costs more because of this.

If you don't want the hassle of fitting a large tank I would go for the multiple tanks route with quick connectors. What you don't want to do is to unstabilise the Searider by putting too much weight at the rear. So have the working tank at the rear and store the additional fuel at the front. The disadvantages to this method are an increase in risk from water contamination and lugging a heavy tank from a forward position to the stern when your fuel runs out in the first. This might not seem like a problem, but would you want to be doing this in a F6? However this method does have a major cost advantage and is easy to install over the permanant method.

The Tanks that Davybouy mentioned look like an excellent soloution for the short term.


Where is your battery located?
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Old 09 December 2009, 07:11   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hightower View Post
and lugging a heavy tank from a forward position to the stern when your fuel runs out in the first.
I have a hose from transom to bow tank. Swapping to the bow tank takes about 30 seconds, of which 20 of them are unclipping the deadman & moving back!

Also WRT trim, you got a 75 on a boat rated for 90 or twin 40s. I bet having an extra few litres of fuel under the engine won't make much difference to the overall balance. Remember these boats were designed for portable tanks in the first place.
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Old 09 December 2009, 07:53   #7
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I have a single 50ish Ltr tank which I moved forward of the console and this had quite a dramatic affect coming off waves (not ass heavy like B4). I guess if you are carrying so much fuel I would say spread forward and aft to maintain balance.

Ian
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Old 09 December 2009, 08:04   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9D280 View Post
I have a hose from transom to bow tank. Swapping to the bow tank takes about 30 seconds, of which 20 of them are unclipping the deadman & moving back!

Also WRT trim, you got a 75 on a boat rated for 90 or twin 40s. I bet having an extra few litres of fuel under the engine won't make much difference to the overall balance. Remember these boats were designed for portable tanks in the first place.
That's fair comment about a longer fuel line and tapping direct off a bow mounted tank.

Although these Seariders were designed for portable tanks in mind, I doubt that they gave much consideration to the range that these craft travel in the hands of the general public. Otherwise they might have fitted bigger internal tanks.
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Old 09 December 2009, 10:21   #9
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90 l takes up a lot of floor space, which isn't in great supply on a small rib. I'm with 9D2r2d2 and I think he's describing the best solution the Barruas tanks are a good option.
If you decide against it then I'd consider getting a tank made up that fitted inside your console/seats orthat straddles the deck area near the transom. you could ge 60l in a full width tank that would only be about 270mm high and the same widthe either in Ali (not Stainless) or plastic by tek tanks failing that Plastimo do a nifty fuel tank Jery can.

The fuelconnector on a fly lead is a sweet and relarble way of swapping small tanks, i've always found the tohatsu connectors to be nifty

http://www.gulfstreamshop.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=165

http://www.tohatsu.com.au/accessories-fuel.htm the connectors are the silver round type
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Old 09 December 2009, 10:24   #10
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How much capacity do the flexible Fuel cells that the RNLI use on their Seariders take? And where can you buy these from?
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