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Old 07 April 2011, 08:39   #1
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Fuel Cans / Containers

Being tight, and not wanting to pay fuel pontoon prices to fill up now I have an internal fuel tanks, and not wanting to go through the hassle / time of trailering the boat through narrow lanes to the nearest petrol station to fill up either, I've come up with topping the tank up every time with 1-2 jerrycans of new fuel.

Am I right in thinking that with "traditional" metal jerry-cans there is risk of rust / debris getting into the main fuel tank over time?

Is there a 20-25 litre plastic "jerry-can" / container for petrol that will do the same job? I've considered using an old plastic 30l external tank, but they don't pour very well.

Are there any other options?

LT
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Old 07 April 2011, 09:01   #2
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Jerry Cans

A service station shouldn’t let you fill up a plastic 25l jerry can. I think there have been threads on this before.

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Old 07 April 2011, 09:11   #3
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A service station shouldn’t let you fill up a plastic 25l jerry can. I think there have been threads on this before.

Jon
But they are 'demountable tanks' not Jerry cans......in theory .......

But yes they are much stricter nowadays ...I used to take them out of the boot to fill ( for safety ) but after some discussion found leaving them in avoided any problems.....

I used to keep the under deck tank topped up this way - sit it on a seat and use syphon jiggle thingy... just be carefull as it will keep flowing out even if the main tank is full - giving you a petrol covered deck
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Old 07 April 2011, 09:12   #4
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I use two of THESE on the basis that every cheap-jack fuel can I've bought has leaked/smelt/broke...

They're not cheap (circa £30 a throw last time I looked) but they're solid, reliable and leak free, and the spout and valve mechanism makes pouring quickly or slowly both easy and safe
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Old 07 April 2011, 09:15   #5
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I used to take them out of the boot to fill ( for safety ) but after some discussion found leaving them in avoided any problems.....
The supermarket garages round our way have now started asking - via the PA - to see your petrol can before they'll turn the pump on. No 'proper' fuel can, no fuel
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Old 07 April 2011, 09:21   #6
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The supermarket garages round our way have now started asking - via the PA - to see your petrol can before they'll turn the pump on. No 'proper' fuel can, no fuel
You need an ASDA with no attendant (all self service!), or if you fill the car first then the pump will already be 'on'. All much easier than trying to educate the operator that this is a portable tank not a can!

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Originally Posted by lakelandterrier
I've considered using an old plastic 30l external tank, but they don't pour very well.
Can you either siphon it in, or rig up a connector where you use can plumb in the portable tank and use it first (so main tanks are only consumed on longer trips?).

Rust is an issue with metal cans, but crud is an issue with all fuel cans - I find fine sandy grit seems to get its way into mine (I've not worked out if this comes in when checking the fuel level before leaving the beach or with the fuel).
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Old 07 April 2011, 09:51   #7
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or if you fill the car first then the pump will already be 'on'.
Hmmm...but then I end up with diesel in the outboard
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Old 07 April 2011, 10:14   #8
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If I understand the regs, the max size plastic "fuel can" I can fill with petrol is 5l, but I can fill several - I believe it's legal to carry upto 30l of petrol in cans in a car.

Metal containers can be more, but not over 30l (standard jerry can 20l)

Properly constructed "fuel tanks" can be upto 30l capacity (although amny petrol station don't understand the difference betweeen a "can" and a "tank".

Options would seem be:
1) 2 x metal jerry cans and risk some rust over time (although I will use a filter funnel to fill the tank)
2) several 5 litre plastic cans (bit of a faff & take up lots of boot space)
3) Use 30l external tank from the old boat & some kind of pump to effect the transfer

If I to do a long run, or know I'll be using her a lot over a short period ,then I'll fill up at the petrol station / barge, but with the family I'll be doing lots of 2-4 hour trips with lots ofidling / low speed, so my thought was to keep the tank 2/3 full when filling at a pump, then top up for the shorter days, thus keeping relatively fresh fuel in the mix.

With the internal tank I want to avoid getting crud in it. Is the risk of rust from a new jerry-can that great?
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Old 07 April 2011, 11:37   #9
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The supermarket garages round our way have now started asking - via the PA - to see your petrol can before they'll turn the pump on. No 'proper' fuel can, no fuel
Think as long as it is an approved tank or container its ok ,

though from memory most local councils will only allow something like 20 ltres to be stored at premises either domestic or commercial without a petrolium spirit licence .
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Old 07 April 2011, 12:09   #10
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I use two of THESE on the basis that every cheap-jack fuel can I've bought has leaked/smelt/broke...

They're not cheap (circa £30 a throw last time I looked) but they're solid, reliable and leak free, and the spout and valve mechanism makes pouring quickly or slowly both easy and safe
Are these 5 litre cans?
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