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Old 17 June 2009, 13:33   #31
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I'm with Chris on this one ..... and especially so if that ship detects you and also turns to starboard. That would surely put you on an almost certain collision course?
navigating in fog is dangerous! but everyone should have a basic knowledge of the rules (not word for word obviously) if rule 19 is obeyed by all vessels then there should be no problem, however there are many folk, even merchant navy officers who do panic in fog and the rules go out the window. you jus have to be ultra vigilant! so look up rule 19, learn it, jono's picture is spot on.
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Old 17 June 2009, 14:08   #32
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Yes that was a useful and easy to understand post and diagram. I have read Rule 19 too.

Hopefully I won't encounter fog, but I feel equipped to know how I should react and, importantly, how others would react.
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Old 17 June 2009, 17:58   #33
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I wouldn't say it was dangerous just not as easy as navigating in fine weather.

We will launch on exercise to get experience in fog. It doesn't bother me I can head in towards the shore and find out roughly where I am from whats at the bottom of the cliff and make my way home.
Dead reckoning is useful too.
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Old 18 June 2009, 10:07   #34
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I wouldn't say it was dangerous just not as easy as navigating in fine weather.

We will launch on exercise to get experience in fog.
When I was 10 or 11 my dad would from time to time when it was foggy take me out off Newhaven. One of the things he would do was to get me to cover my eyes and spin he boat about to disorientate me and then without the aid of a compass get me to point at the direction of the sounding horn at the end of the harbour wall. It wasn’t always that easy as fog amongst other things can distort sound.

I have gone on to learn over the years is that fog can be very variable. Sometimes patchy sometimes thick, some times you can see over it and on one occasion I was able to see under it.

And like all of us I am still learning.

Jon
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Old 18 June 2009, 15:19   #35
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i was trying to point out that its easy for novices to try keep on the safe side of things by adding a few deg in case they miss the point of intrest only then to be miles from where they want to be especially if its a wide estury and fog is causing disorientation .and not on about compass error ,but on that point make sure there is nothing going to error the compass keep everything well clear such as torch or radio anchor even the spare outboard ,regards mart
As an alternative view, I would actually advocate that people (not just novices) DO consider adding a few degrees if they are heading for an harbour, river mouth, estuary etc, and that they deliberately aim to MISS the point of interest.

Reasoning: it can be pretty tough to make a landfall perfectly in poor vis, and the technique of "aiming off" is a valid one. Instead off hoping that your navigation will take you exactly to the point you want, plan to make your landfall at a point where you know beyond any reasonable doubt that you will have to turn either left or right to reach the point you are heading for. Takes away a lot of doubt and worry when you close the coast. If you have a free choice, choose the safer side of your POI to head for
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Old 21 June 2009, 05:18   #36
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As an alternative view, I would actually advocate that people (not just novices) DO consider adding a few degrees if they are heading for an harbour, river mouth, estuary etc, and that they deliberately aim to MISS the point of interest.

Reasoning: it can be pretty tough to make a landfall perfectly in poor vis, and the technique of "aiming off" is a valid one. Instead off hoping that your navigation will take you exactly to the point you want, plan to make your landfall at a point where you know beyond any reasonable doubt that you will have to turn either left or right to reach the point you are heading for. Takes away a lot of doubt and worry when you close the coast. If you have a free choice, choose the safer side of your POI to head for
i agree seaskills ,though the point i was making is ,its easy for the unexperienced to put a safe side on,aiming off ,then after a while ,dont trust the compass get nervous and keep adding or subbing until they are totaly disorentated,,in our area of the north sea we get the notourious sea frets that can form in less than a min or two,one of the annoying ones is when you get a thick fret or fog with viz about 2 or 3 meters but a clear blue sky above ,you can stand up on the console or wheelhouse and have a view over the top for miles in places yet hardly see your own bow .,,for those that have a trumpet type fog horn, make a sleeve to go on the end and use the foot pump ,regards mart
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Old 21 June 2009, 07:08   #37
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i agree seaskills ,though the point i was making is ,its easy for the unexperienced to put a safe side on,aiming off ,then after a while ,dont trust the compass get nervous and keep adding or subbing until they are totaly disorentated,,in our area of the north sea we get the notourious sea frets that can form in less than a min or two,one of the annoying ones is when you get a thick fret or fog with viz about 2 or 3 meters but a clear blue sky above ,you can stand up on the console or wheelhouse and have a view over the top for miles in places yet hardly see your own bow .,,for those that have a trumpet type fog horn, make a sleeve to go on the end and use the foot pump ,regards mart
Aye, we get similar here. Bugger to find them when they get lost in it too, isn't it?

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Old 21 June 2009, 17:59   #38
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Aye, we get similar here. Bugger to find them when they get lost in it too, isn't it?

yes its great when you get a call over the radio asking have you see anyone yet ,and you reply back saying i can see my own boat lol
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Old 22 June 2009, 17:36   #39
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Where a man would need say half a dozen different items in a bathroom a ....
Been thinking about this, ....what are the other three for?
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Old 22 June 2009, 17:52   #40
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Talking of fog I saw on Coast earlier that most of the foghorns around the coats have been phased out. Is this true? It may not be so essential these days with GPS etc but still reassuring - especially to pleasure craft.

I know the one Mumbles still works - unless it was the Nash Point one as I heard it about 3 months ago. A wonderful but eerie sound.
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