Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 09 October 2015, 13:22   #11
Member
 
Maximus's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Wild West
Boat name: No Boat
Make: No Boat
Length: under 3m
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4,272
Send a message via AIM to Maximus
Fist time I've really seen this thread...no way Fishing Hook or Any other Fish "Damage".
Looks like poorly made Tubes to me...& seem delam....Sure they are Hyperlon!?..looks more like it may be PVC from the pics.
If you ever had a play with a piece of decent Hyperlon....it would be a real job to DELIBERATELY push a Hook through..let alone pull one into an inflated tube on the end of a Rod...with all the Flex and stretch in the line ect.
IMO Just a coincidence you'd been out Fishing....and I bet if you fix that small leak,it won't be very long before you get another...elsewhere.
__________________

__________________
A clever Man learns by his mistakes..
A Wise Man learns by other people's!

The Road to HELL ..is Paved with "Good inventions!"
Maximus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 14:24   #12
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by ba_fisher View Post
and ... it looks like California rockfish aren't compatible with tubes :-(
They're not. A spearfishing buddy of mine always carries a pair of EMT shears to cut the fins off Vermilions he shoots. The spines have a habit of stabbing divers thighs while on stringers, and have caused more than one puncture on inflatables. AFAIK, it's mostly the Vermilions; haven't heard of problems with other varieties of rockfish (though it also wouldn't surprise me; they're all pretty closely related.)

Luck with the repair.

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 14:34   #13
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Length: 5m +
Engine: 135hp Mercury
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximus View Post
...it would be a real job to DELIBERATELY push a Hook through..let alone pull one into an inflated tube on the end of a Rod...with all the Flex and stretch in the line ect.
IMO Just a coincidence you'd been out Fishing....and I bet if you fix that small leak,it won't be very long before you get another...elsewhere.
Possibly with monofil, but braid has no stretch.
BTW if you fish & haven't tried braid as a mainline it's well worth the change. Far more sensitive to takes & due to its low diameter needs far less lead to hold bottom/stay at depth.
__________________
paintman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 14:49   #14
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: S. Carolina
Boat name: D560
Make: Avon
Length: 5m +
Engine: 2016 Merc 115hp CT
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by ba_fisher View Post
I haven't, but the supplies from NRS have arrived, and I plan to do it over the weekend. Fingers crossed.

Clifton Hypalon Adhesive Gluing Instructions at NRS.com


Inflate the boat to ~200 millibar.

Trace the patch on the boat with a pencil. Center the hole in the patch. Mask around your tracing, leaving a 1/16 - 1/32 inch gap to account for if you don't lay the patch 100% in the middle of the masking tape (no glue = no stick)...excess glue will be removed later.


Sand the patch, sand the boat until dull with 60-100 grit sandpaper. Wipe both surfaces with toluene. Wait 5 min for evaporation. Repeat two more times.

Deflate the boat.

Follow your glue instructions for mixing and application.

1.) When laying up, start at the bottom edge of the patch, lightly laying the patch. STOP WHEN YOU GET TO THE SEAM. DO NOT LAY THE TOP EDGE OF THE MATERIAL YET.
2.) Use your burnishing tool, burnish the seam edge to edge to form a nice 90 degree cliff in the patch
3.) Continue laying the top of the patch down, burnish the whole patch down.

Once you are done, remove the masking tape. Lightly dampen a rag with toluene. Wipe around the patch to remove excess glue. Big globs of glue will need to be lightly rubbed with the toluene rag, then lightly scraped with your burnishing tool.

WEAR A HALF MASK RESPIRATOR WITH ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGES
ONLY GLUE IF THE TEMP IS BETWEEN 55F - 85F , BELOW 65% HUMIDITY
__________________
Richard
Gluing geek since 2007
office888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 15:02   #15
Member
 
beerbelly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: teesside
Make: valiant v570
Length: 5m +
Engine: mercury 100
MMSI: 232012453
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 859
Quote:
Originally Posted by paintman View Post
Possibly with monofil, but braid has no stretch.
BTW if you fish & haven't tried braid as a mainline it's well worth the change. Far more sensitive to takes & due to its low diameter needs far less lead to hold bottom/stay at depth.
i recently changed to braid much better feeling the fishy nibbles and as its thinner can get more on the spool no give when you strike ect ect I wont go back to mono
__________________
beerbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 15:21   #16
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Length: 5m +
Engine: 135hp Mercury
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 708
If you get stuck don't try & pull with your hands, wrap it round something - I use a hammer handle which also doubles as a priest.
I use a mono trace for redgills etc from the weight/french boom to the redgill, but for casting & spinning with plugs/spoons/weighted shads & eels etc I attach the plug directly to the braid with a clip. Doesn't bother the fish at all.
Apologies for the thread hi-jack!
__________________
paintman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 16:30   #17
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Mountain View, CA
Boat name: Six Park
Make: Mercury
Length: 4m +
Engine: Suzuki 30ATL
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 209
I'll hijack the thread myself :-)

For rockfishing around here, braided lines are a must. The water is deep, and if the line is snagged in the rocks, which happens a lot, it's really really hard to break the hook off with nylon lines, as they will easily stretch a few feet in 100ft deep water. Breaking off braided lines is fairly simple, but you must wear gloves.
__________________
ba_fisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 16:38   #18
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Mountain View, CA
Boat name: Six Park
Make: Mercury
Length: 4m +
Engine: Suzuki 30ATL
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 209
@Office888, thank you so much for your instructions!

Before seeing your instructions, I was thinking of using a small circular patch that stops right at the seam. I found 3 pin holes. If I patch this way, all the holes will be about 1/2 inches to the edge of the patch.

I called NRS and they recommended that patching is not necessary for my situation, so I should just use Aquaseal Urethane Repair Kit.

So what are the pros and cons with these approaches? Most of all, what would go wrong if a pin hole is too close to the edge of a patch?
__________________
ba_fisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 October 2015, 16:53   #19
RIBnet admin team
 
willk's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Make: Redbay Boats
Length: 9m +
Engine: 370hp
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,928
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by willk View Post
but IMO, a small amount of Urethane glue (as used to repair waders and other rubberlike items) will also work
Quote:
Originally Posted by ba_fisher View Post
I called NRS and they recommended that patching is not necessary for my situation, so I should just use Aquaseal Urethane Repair Kit[/URL].
No sh1t!?!
__________________
"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?"
.
willk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 October 2015, 11:41   #20
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by ba_fisher View Post
I called NRS and they recommended that patching is not necessary for my situation, so I should just use Aquaseal Urethane Repair Kit.
I use Aquaseal for drysuit and buoyancy compensator repair all the time - works well for that. I have only seen it used on an inflatable once (while it held, it was an ugly repair; mostly due to the guy doing the reapir, I think.)

If you do go the Aquaseal route, make sure you have the clear, unfilled Cotol 240 activator (it looks like water - do not use the "filled" stuff that is an opaque white.) If you don't have it, I have a quart can and I can get some to you. I like using a lighter mix than McNett suggests (up to about a 2-1 Cotol to Aquaseal ratio for getting penetration into fabric.) For your tubes, maybe a 1 - 2 (Cotol to Aquaseal) should be OK. Make sure the repair area is level (as the stuff will run and pool), and use light layers. Activated with Cotol, Aquaseal will cure in anywhere from 10 to 60 minutes (vs over 24 hrs unactivated.) Recoat as soon as the surface becomes tack free (or any time after that.)

Might want to rough up the surface a bit to get some key for the urethane to stick to, and degrease well.

I would think that it would do fine for pinholes if you use a .5" - 1" spot repair per pinhole. Stuff holds pretty well. If it doesn't, you should be able to patch directly over the repair.

Luck;

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 21:16.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.