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Old 28 June 2014, 18:53   #1
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First Aid Kit on your RIB

Do you have a First Aid Kit on your RIB ?

If so, where and how do you store it?

What have you got in it?
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Old 28 June 2014, 19:07   #2
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A big plastic sandwich type box from Tesco keeps it dry
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Old 28 June 2014, 19:23   #3
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Possibly of interest: What kit do you carry on your SIB?
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Old 28 June 2014, 19:27   #4
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Thanks, 'I may be a while' . . . 12 pages to review
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Old 28 June 2014, 22:37   #5
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I do (or did) a lot of diving; My first aid kit used to be probably about a thousand times overkill. It fills a Pelican 1450 (I think that's the number.) Lots of bleeding control, painkillers and bandages, along with jellyfish stuff, anti-histamines, and the like. That generally lives in the truck now, and a smaller version is on the boat. Same general thrust, but less stuff.

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Old 29 June 2014, 03:33   #6
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I increasingly think ribs should have two kits. One that you hope never to need and one you kind of expect to need. The expect to would have the regular stuff you need to survive a day out with kids... Plasters, paracetamol, bee string, maybe even an icepack and a crepe bandage. The content will be highly variable depending on (a) the people (b) your type of ribbing.
You should expect it to get wet because when you open it for a plaster a wave always appears... That's my reason for splitting it because if these things get wet they are an inconvenience but no one dies. They either stop you calling it a day early or make you more comfortable. Then you need the ability to deal with some serious sh1t. That should never get wet as you never should need to open it.

What's in the serious sh1t kit will vary depending on your territory. You should be able to stabilise a Ling bone fracture and apply pressure to a serious bleed and deal with hypothermia. If you are doing major passages with lifted ability to turn left and hit a beach with a man in a green jump suit waiting for you you will need more. As a suggestion there is not much you can't achieve with 6 triangular bandages and a couple of ambulance dressings #9 or #3... And a survival bag (plastic) and a foil one. Ideally you have spare clothes etc in a dry bag.

But if you are doing long passages away from easy help you need more.
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Old 29 June 2014, 05:10   #7
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My boating first aid kit is a small general purpose first aid kit in a zip up pouch. I've taken out some of the less useful stuff and added some bits and pieces, but it's basically for scrapes and headaches. This lives in a dry bag with the proper "first aid" kit: two medium trauma dressings, a Sam splint, a pair of EMT shears and a Laerdal face mask.

SP Services are good for first aid supplies and their trauma dressings come in durable waterproof packaging.
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Old 29 June 2014, 06:22   #8
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........stabilise a Ling bone fracture........
Nahh! I just gut 'em & cut their heads off

PS I just carry a small kit in the boat dry bag. As long as you can control a severe bleed, most other stuff can wait. Your options are severely limited in an open, rolling, wet RIB.

Airway
Breathing
Circulation
Cavalry
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Old 29 June 2014, 14:12   #9
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I completely agree Pikey. It depends a lot on your boating. If you can chuck an anchor out wherever you are and not feel like you are riding a bucking bronco then for a long (stupid phone!) Bone fracture I'd anchor and get help to come to me.

If it's rough then even at anchor some attempt to splint will reduce pain on movement. If it's not anchorable then a run to safety may well be in order... Doing that with a splinted fracture will be far less likely to cause a major bleed.

Never tried splint with duct tape...
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Old 29 June 2014, 14:17   #10
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One other useful item is the plastic wrapping film (the stuff you see palleted cargo wrapped in.) Available in different widths ( I think I carry the 6") and can be fairly easily re-packaged to a size you can carry in whatever you use for a kit. Can control bleeding in a large wound, an apply above-mentioned splint, keep other dressings reasonably dry, and comes in handy for leftover salami and stuff. Uses are up to the imagination.

jky
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