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Old 14 December 2009, 08:21   #61
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For normal leisure use on a powerboat there is no advantage to a manual, and no significant disadvantage to an auto.
What about when you fall in when launching? Not that I've done that and anyone that claims to have seen the event happen will be dealt with.

I wear a manual due to me always getting wet when launching but given my health it really is a stupid choice. Do they do those kits to change a manual to auto on Typhoon LG's?

And Gibbo, glad you and your Girlfriend are OK mate.
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Old 14 December 2009, 08:32   #62
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What about when you fall in when launching?
Then depending on the circumstances it will either be a bit of a nuisance, or save your life!
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I wear a manual due to me always getting wet when launching but given my health it really is a stupid choice. Do they do those kits to change a manual to auto on Typhoon LG's?
Don't know about an upgrade kit, but maybe you'd be better off having a look at your launching technique!
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Old 14 December 2009, 08:39   #63
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Then depending on the circumstances it will either be a bit of a nuisance, or save your life!Don't know about an upgrade kit, but maybe you'd be better off having a look at your launching technique!
Erm excuse me!....
That's better,
sorry about the smell.

Launching a heavy SR5.4 with flooding hull, on a very shallow slip, with a bottom made of silt, sh!t and fish guts that you sink into. Means getting wet as you have to walk the bugger out a bit before you can get the motor down.
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Old 14 December 2009, 08:44   #64
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That post bought back some memories for me - and I'm very glad to read that you were both OK.

I came out of my boat in July and dislocated my shoulder in the process, I am not young and fit and had I not been wearing a life jacket, I wouldn't be here now. And I'm really not exaggerating. I'm still having physio which acts as a regular reminder!

After the accident, I did a couple of things.

1. I replaced all my manual jackets for auto inflates. I managed to inflate my manual jacket in the accident - but figured that auto was going to be safer in the future.

2. I always wear a kill cord (you did too - thank God), but I didn't wear one in my accident. My own stupidity.

3. Always give a safety briefing to anyone who comes aboard.

Really very glad to read you were both OK, your post really made an impact on me having been involved in something similar.

I had always thought that chine walking crept in, I've been on the edge of it and backed off immediately... didn't know it could suddenly appear....
Neilda

On the way back in, i did think about your incident and do remember the discussion about kill cords and for me the importance of that really stuck in my head from that day onwards. I was not going to post about the day as yes i did feel a tw*t but more importantly i think alot is learnt from other peoples misfortunes or mistakes. The expert views and opinions from this forum will hopefully prepare not just me but everyone if it was to happen again or to them.
I am no expert but i am reasonably confident in my ability, (Intermediate PB, day skipper, VHF, First Aid) and have racked up a number of hours on the water which to me is more important than any qualification, and i had safety kit on the boat. In a way i am glad for that experience as it just makes you realise what can go wrong even in favourable conditions, i think we all become complacent over time and think it will never happen to me? I am afraid it can happen at anytime!!!!

As i originally posted i wasn't after sympathy or anything but thank the forum for the messages of concern.
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Old 14 December 2009, 08:47   #65
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One of these?
http://www.outdoorstore.co.uk/products/bothy%20bags.asp
Looks like a handy bit of kit, but a 2 orange plastic survival bag would probably be just as good for most people!
Yes - having used both I would much rather have the bothy bag - the effect of heat sharing is surprisingly effective - whereas to achieve that in an orange survival bag requires you to get quite intimate. I suspect one of the major benefits is that your head in enclosed which brings us nicely back to the earlier point! I also see the bothy bag as a bit more preventative whereas whilst you could use a survival bag that way - people tend not to. Perhaps because they are a bugger to pack away again. I've sat inside mine to have lunch in a hail storm and to read maps etc - and the moral boost is significant.

I think my current one cost about 15 quid, and I bought it to take on a three day mountain bike trip - where it took up less space and weight than us each carrying a survival bag - I've used bigger ones that will fit 7 or 8 people in the past. It fits three people (just) and so can keep multiple people warm if you manage to tip everyone in the sea. But of course a cheap survival bag will suit many people if survival is the sole objective.
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Old 14 December 2009, 08:48   #66
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Launching a heavy SR5.4 with flooding hull, on a very shallow slip, with a bottom made of silt, sh!t and fish guts that you sink into. Means getting wet as you have to walk the bugger out a bit before you can get the motor down.
You paint such an appealing pixcture! Sounds like you may not fit into the "normal leisure use" category . . .
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Old 14 December 2009, 08:58   #67
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Neilda

On the way back in, I did think about your incident and do remember the discussion about kill cords and for me the importance of that really stuck in my head from that day onwards. ..........

I think we all become complacent over time and think it will never happen to me? I am afraid it can happen at anytime!!!!
We all learn from each other I guess - what makes me anxious about chine walking is that you can ALL be thrown into the water. Those who have been dramatically thrown in the drink will attest to the fact that it's quite scary, particularly when injured as you feel so much more vulnerable. When all passengers are in, it adds a new dimension - even more so without the kill cord as some of you could easily be hit by the giant blender.

I'm glad my experience might have made you think twice about a kill cord, I'm a moderate evangelist on the subject these days!!

Our hobby is such a delight, but the dangers lurk not far away.... my accident was on a beautiful summer day, it would have seemed ludicrous if someone had forecast the drama ahead.

Auto jackets seem very sensible, I saved a few bob with manuals, but very quickly changed to autos.

Is your girlfriend as keen on boating as she was before?
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Old 14 December 2009, 09:14   #68
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Is your girlfriend as keen on boating as she was before?
Yes she is fine, she was a bit narked she lost her favourite sunglasses though
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Old 14 December 2009, 09:54   #69
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Actually gentlemen the colour is very very relevant.
Now as you know leisure boaters follow SOLAS V regulations for all leisure craft under 150GT, however in the commercial world IACS (International Association of Classification Societies) are having a current discussion on just the subject of colour and this is what they say.


1 IACS notes that the version of paragraph 1.2.2.6 of the LSA Code currently in force at the

time of submitting this document requires all life-saving appliances prescribed in this part to be of a highly visible colour on all parts where this will assist detection;
but it is expected that on 1 July 2010 resolution MSC.207(81) will amend this requirement to6 be of international or vivid reddish orange, or a comparably highly visible colour
on all parts where this will assist detection at sea;
So in the commercial world colour is very relevant

That is why most mooring bouys are bright orange, so you can see them easily from a distance.

That is why when you are being rescued by a helicopter you should be using an orange hand held smoke flare.

And if you also put the very expensive scotchlite reflective tape on your orange stuff (and also your Gecko helmet) you will be seen by radar from miles away.

Merry Christmas to you all.
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Old 14 December 2009, 10:42   #70
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Actually gentlemen the colour is very very relevant.
Now as you know leisure boaters follow SOLAS V regulations for all leisure craft under 150GT, however in the commercial world IACS (International Association of Classification Societies) are having a current discussion on just the subject of colour and this is what they say.


1 IACS notes that the version of paragraph 1.2.2.6 of the LSA Code currently in force at the

time of submitting this document requires all life-saving appliances prescribed in this part to be of a highly visible colour on all parts where this will assist detection;
but it is expected that on 1 July 2010 resolution MSC.207(81) will amend this requirement to6 be of international or vivid reddish orange, or a comparably highly visible colour
on all parts where this will assist detection at sea;
So in the commercial world colour is very relevant

That is why most mooring bouys are bright orange, so you can see them easily from a distance.

That is why when you are being rescued by a helicopter you should be using an orange hand held smoke flare.

And if you also put the very expensive scotchlite reflective tape on your orange stuff (and also your Gecko helmet) you will be seen by radar from miles away.

Merry Christmas to you all.
And since Gibbo is not opperating commercially all rather irrelevant. The purpose of the bag is to keep you warm. Its highly distinctive colour is of little significance when returning to shore to rewarm a casualty - although granted if you find yourself needing to attract the attention of a lifeboat or helo it might help - but then your inflated l/j is bright orange too.

What makes you think that Scotchlite tape increases radar cross section?
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