Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 17 August 2002, 16:21   #1
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Drysuits

I'm thinking about buying a drysuit. Now, I've never had one before, so I did a little research, asked a couple of friends, and even tried to buy a second-hand one on this forum (from Mike Garside who's much taller and thinner than me! - that dissolved into a hilarious exchange between Mike and Charles... ) Anyway, I've ended up being pointed towards Ravenspring. I've also looked at the Lough Ree Power Boat School website (www.powerboat.org), who market what appears to be Ravenspring's top spec drysuit with all the options included.

So now I thought , ask the guys who have been using them for years. Any recommendations? I'm thinking that Ravenspring's Rapide looks like it's worth the extra 50 over the Uno, and what options are useful or necessary? Are built in hard boots a good idea? Should I be considering another manufacturer?

Advice much appreciated,
Richard.
__________________

__________________
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17 August 2002, 18:44   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portishead, Bristol
Boat name: "
Make: Ribcraft, Cowes Mari
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mercury 90hp 4-strok
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 600
Send a message via AIM to jools
I bought a ravensping earlier this year after advice from the forum.

I have gone for the "Duo" this is a two piece suit, Trousers and a top, with boots fitted to the trousers. The two pieces are sealed in the middle by rolling the rubber seals together - I've never had any problems with them leaking. (Ask people how wet I used to get on Tomkat - Still for sale by the way!)

Obviously depends a bit on usage - boots are no good if you are trying to waterski!! - Seals or socks would be OK.

So why did I choose this sort?

The trousers are great for launching - you dont need to put a full suit on and they come upto your chest - How many people do you see at launch sites with half a drysuit on!! or getting very hot in a drysuit.

If its getting cold and wet then just put the top on aswell.

To start with I didn't have a drysuit and although I had waterproofs the water came in through the neck when it was wet - This is whats so good about having a drysuit.

The website is www.ravensping.co.uk - and there's a couple of me in my suit on my website (click the www below)

Cheers
Jools
__________________

__________________
www.ribpanther.co.uk
jools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 August 2002, 06:34   #3
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Newfoundland
Length: no boat
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 2,097
Richard,

Ravenspring suits are the biz - but not cheap. I am on my second Rapide and have worn them for days on end going round Britain and upto Scotland earlier this year. The people at Ravenspring are very helpful - I spec'd up my new suit with them to improve upon the things that bugged me about the first one. So being a biggish chap I have got extra room in the shoulders and arms, wider wrist cuffs (big hands!) etc. I have also gone for hard boots which are definately the way to go IMHO. The other option to go for if you are going to be wearing it for extended periods is the "comfort zip"! Looks unsightly but believe me its a damn sight easier to unzip and seek relief than struggle out of the damn suit in a seaway to do the neccessary!

The suits are also breathable which is a big bonus. They are popular with lots of Ribsters - Brian has one, JCW as well.

HTH, Alan
__________________
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 August 2002, 04:23   #4
Administrator
 
John Kennett's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Brighton
Length: 3m +
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 6,830
A drysuit is definitely a good idea if you're going to do any serious ribbing. The extra effort involved in putting it an and taking it off each time is a small price to pay for staying dry -- even the best "offshore" waterproofs will not keep you dry!

My 2p worth:

Do make sure you choose a breathable dry suit, otherwise you will get wet from the inside.

Definitely, definitely get what Alan so tactfully describes as a "comfort zip"!

The rest is really down to personal preference. I find hard boots definitely preferable as they are less hassle, and I reckon that having the main zip along the back of the shoulders is more comfortable than the front diagonal type.

Having said all this, I started off with a Musto "dinghy" suit which meets none of my criteria above and it was still better than conventional waterproofs!

John
__________________
John Kennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 August 2002, 06:10   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Aberystwyth
Boat name: Undecided
Make: Undecided
Length: Undecided
Engine: Undecided
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 605
And do go for a proper boating drysuit. I use my diving drysuit when on the RIB and it is not the most comfortable thing to wear out of the water all day long. By the end of the day you'll be soaking inside due to sweat, and the wrist and neck seals can iritate the skin when dry. And as has already been said, a comfort zip is a must!

When I was doing the boat handling course with some of the others from my dive club we must have looked stupid, wearing our diving drysuits to keep dry, and our stab jackets as life jackets, people on shore must have thought we'd forgotten the tanks or something.

Matt
__________________
narked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 August 2002, 17:29   #6
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
This is very helpful, so thanks all.

I think there's only two decisions to make now, and that's one-piece or two piece ...and front or back zip. Just glad I didn't buy one of the mega-expensive ones with a "breathable panel"
__________________
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 August 2002, 18:15   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Aberystwyth
Boat name: Undecided
Make: Undecided
Length: Undecided
Engine: Undecided
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 605
Personally I prefer back zips, the zip doesnt get "deformed" anywhere near as much, although it's not a huge problem with heavy duty drysuit zips, but then you need someone to zip you up and release you.
__________________
narked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 August 2002, 19:00   #8
Member
 
Country: Ireland
Town: Ireland
Boat name: Ally Cat
Make: Several
Length: 6m +
Engine: Several
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 333
Lough Ree Power Boat School

Hi Richard,

We do indeed market Ravenspring Dry Suits here in Ireland .

The "Rescue" Dry Suit we market is one we designed along with Ravenspring to suit some of our Professional Boat Squad training clients.

This Ribsters Suit has been very successful !

Essentially we ended up with what we thought were the best bits of all Ravensprings Dry Suits .

Give me a buzz off forum if I can be of any help !

Best wishes ,

Stuart
__________________
Stuart McNamara
Club Powerboat.ie
www.powerboat.org
Powerboat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 August 2002, 04:24   #9
Administrator
 
John Kennett's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Brighton
Length: 3m +
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 6,830
Quote:
Just glad I didn't buy one of the mega-expensive ones with a "breathable panel"
I've got one of these, kindly supplied by Otter Drysuits for Round Britain 1999, and it's great. The breathable back panel works fine for me and I stay dry. The rest of the suit is seriously heavy duty and I would expect it to outlast a Ravenspring suit, which have always seemed a bit lightweight to me (although to be fair I have never owned one so may be proved wrong).
Quote:
Personally I prefer back zips, the zip doesnt get "deformed" anywhere near as much, although it's not a huge problem with heavy duty drysuit zips, but then you need someone to zip you up and release you.
I am hardly the most flexible person in the world, but I have found that I can do up my drysuit zip and get it undone again on my own, although I didn't expect to be able to! I think the key is to have the zip quite high up on the shoulders, not halfway down your back, which will vary depending on the manufacturer.

John
__________________

__________________
John Kennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:00.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.