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Old 02 December 2008, 01:29   #21
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A Mac

Thanks for the advice. I hadn't thought of using your 'duvet technique' to keep me afloat.

I already own a variety of PFD's, including a suitable one for my re-cycled hemp, dry suit. (very warm but it leaks a bit)

Because I am so safety conscious and because I live VERY close to the sea, it won't surprise you to know that I also have a special PFD that I wear to bed. You never know when you might be hit by a rogue wave in the middle of the night or when you might be caught on a journalists camera.

Mrs BB is a very understanding young Hazel, so she doesn't mind too much.

Peace and love to you all.
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Old 02 December 2008, 02:37   #22
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Looks like I'll need to get myself a 275N then.
Just going down the drysuit route myself...but have a 150N crewsaver automatic inflatable lifejacket. Can the 150N be converted to a 275N just by changing the inflation canister or is it more complex than that?
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Old 02 December 2008, 02:42   #23
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NO. It will go bang I think! I'm sure there will be a more thorough explanation along soon.
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Old 02 December 2008, 02:45   #24
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NO. It will go bang! I'm sure there will be a more thorough explanation along soon.
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Old 02 December 2008, 03:29   #25
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One thing to be aware of with a drysuit is you need to avoid getting hot and sweaty when launching boats, because you will be cold later on, especially at this time of year. That insulation under a drysuit isn't going to work if your wetter than a wet thing.

Pete
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Old 02 December 2008, 04:39   #26
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It will if you buy a decent thermal liner like Musto that wicks away any moisture.
During the summer it looks as though my suit is leaking as the outside of the liner is damp but the inside is dry!
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Old 02 December 2008, 04:54   #27
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... stopped using my Henri Lloyd neoprene gloves and switched to Sealskin (merely a tradename ) - layers of wool, ...
Have still to find a solution to the warm feet issue -
Bob - are your feet getting wet? sealskin (and others) do socks too - which are popular with mountain bikers for keeping feet warm when its wet. Alternatively are you wrapping them up so much you are cutting off the circulation?
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Old 02 December 2008, 05:18   #28
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we use marinepool floatation suits with 50N bouyancy plus when deemed neccessary a 150N lifejacket these suit seem to give the best of both worlds are easy on and off We have been useing them in all weathers since 1995 try www.marinepool.com or pm me for details
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Old 02 December 2008, 07:26   #29
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Absolutely.

There is another point to consider. What is less well known in this context is that if you're wearing the extra buoyancy that a drysuit/wetsuit/survival suit provides, you actually should wear a lifejacket with greater buoyancy than otherwise (probably a 275N jacket rather than 150N). There are two problems that come with extra buoyancy in the wrong place. One is that the extra buoyancy that comes with air around your legs causes your lower body to float higher in the water, and that changed body attitude pushes your head further back and your airways aren't held clear of the water in the same way. Second, the air trapped inside (and the same can apply to oilies) can be caught around your back and make it hard - maybe impossible if the wearer is unconscious - to correctly turn you face up in the water

Your choice of PFD needs to be informed by what you're wearing
I emailed Crewsaver for their view on this...which is, that a Crewsaver 150N lifejacket is good with their drysuits. Quote from Crewsaver "We suggest 275N jackets for Ocean going and when wearing many layers of foul weather gear"
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Old 02 December 2008, 08:43   #30
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Quote:
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I emailed Crewsaver for their view on this...which is, that a Crewsaver 150N lifejacket is good with their drysuits. Quote from Crewsaver "We suggest 275N jackets for Ocean going and when wearing many layers of foul weather gear"
I agree with the Crewsaver suggestion that a 275N jacket is appropriate for ocean-going and when wearing many layers of gear, and I'll stand by my view that it is also appropriate when wearing clothing that provides additional buoyancy.

I think that most people would agree that Mike Tipton of the University of Portsmouth is generally recognised as the UK's prime authority on survival at sea, and his work on understanding why we have too many immersion deaths resulted in his view that it is because of:

- poor knowledge and understanding of the hazards, resulting in poor standards and inadequate equipment
- inadequately prepared and equipped individuals
- design and integration of PPE
- unrealistic testing of equipment resulting in over-estimation of performance (how many people know that tests are normally conducted by the manufacturers in relatively warm and calm indoor pools, with unclothed or normally clothed subjects?)

Tipton reminds us that "it has been known for many years that the buoyancy distributed throughout immersion suits can negate some of the beneficial characteristics of a lifejacket". In fact, the degree of variability of performance in the equipment tested was as much as 10-fold)

The recent investigation into the tragedy of the Ouzo found that although all three of the yachtsmen who died were wearing lifejackets, 2 were found drowned with their heads submerged, suspended by the armpits from the waiststrap of their LJs which were not fitted properly. In the 3rd victim the LJ fitted better but was still found floating nearly vertical with his airway submerged.

Our experience with simulating unconscious casualties has been that a 150N jacket cannot be guaranteed to turn the casualty face up with airway clear of the water when the wearer is dressed in a drysuit or floatation suit
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