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Old 27 November 2012, 11:52   #1
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Dry suit or not?

Well this may sound like a daft question but do all of you wear /use dry suits when launching and recovering? Especially in winter?

Or do you use something else?
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Old 27 November 2012, 12:06   #2
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Your gonna regret that question as all the usual comedians will pounce on it
But to answer your question it depends on the weather and sea conditions it can range from shorts and t-shirt to the full suit.
Hope that helps
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Old 27 November 2012, 12:15   #3
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Your gonna regret that question as all the usual comedians will pounce on it
But to answer your question it depends on the weather and sea conditions it can range from shorts and t-shirt to the full suit.
Hope that helps
Let them jump on it .. point is for someone new to this it's a big investment alongside the cost of rib/fuel/storage/safety gear if they don't get used then it's an unjustified expense all in one hit!

Anyone use waders be a viable option? As a cheaper alternative.. Obviously if you fall over in waders you've had it or if the water is too deep you've had it

Not everyone has masses of experience in this area hence the question
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Old 27 November 2012, 12:39   #4
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I use waders for launch/recovery, at least when the water is colder. Shorts and flip-flops in high summer (if we ever get such a thing again!).

I'd consider a dry-suit to be more of a safety consideration, particularly if you're going to be taking the boat out when water temperatures are low, as it would increase survival chances should the worst happen.
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Old 27 November 2012, 12:44   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gooner-paul
Well this may sound like a daft question but do all of you wear /use dry suits when launching and recovering? Especially in winter?

Or do you use something else?
Depends if you want to get your feet wet or not most of the people I know have some sort of drysuit
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Old 27 November 2012, 12:50   #6
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Dry suits are ok but I doubt they're as good as most people think. All designs will suffer from 'flush' at the collar and hands (and feet if they don't have integral socks). Once water gets in the suit it will be absorbed by your clothes and make you cold. I'm sure dry suits are great if you're only in the water for a relatively short period but for long immersions you're far better off with a wet suit. As far as launching and retrieving is concerned, I'd just use waders or take a towel with you and do it in your knickers.
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Old 27 November 2012, 13:11   #7
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All designs will suffer from 'flush' at the collar and hands (and feet if they don't have integral socks). Once water gets in the suit it will be absorbed by your clothes and make you cold.

I'm sure dry suits are great if you're only in the water for a relatively short period but for long immersions you're far better off with a wet suit. .
Me thinks this is the wrong way around. Dry suits are just that - dry! Wet suits work by letting in water for the body to heat and use as an insulator.

In the winter it's dry for me, either full suit or dry trousers and top
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Old 27 November 2012, 13:28   #8
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never had a problem with seals flushing...only leaky seams etc. Except when diving I can dump the air via the neck seal on ascent by putting m'head back a bit but the air is positive pressure then. Get neoprene seals if ya get a drysuit ...latex ones perish quickly or tear and are uncomfortable. Neoprene ones are comfy and warm and tougher.
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Old 27 November 2012, 13:52   #9
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Me thinks this is the wrong way around. Dry suits are just that - dry! Wet suits work by letting in water for the body to heat and use as an insulator.

In the winter it's dry for me, either full suit or dry trousers and top
You're right about water ingress not being too much of an issue with wet suits and the best of them let very little water in at all. Drysuits are ok but are not intended for long-term immersion; they will allow water in and when that happens you will get cold because of the volume of the suit and the fact that it offers no insulation. I have both a dry and (several) wetsuits for my jet ski and I prefer a wetsuit, especially in the winter.
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:02   #10
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You're right about water ingress not being too much of an issue with wet suits and the best of them let very little water in at all. Drysuits are ok but are not intended for long-term immersion; they will allow water in and when that happens you will get cold because of the volume of the suit and the fact that it offers no insulation. I have both a dry and (several) wetsuits for my jet ski and I prefer a wetsuit, especially in the winter.
Have to disagree on that one there are good and bad dry suits some leak some don't. If you look at technical diving or just general diving in the UK you will be warmer and dryer in a dry suit you wear undergarments that breath and take the sweat/moisture away from the skin and trap in the outer layers.
I also use a Othree semi dry (wetsuit) which has tight wrist and ankle seals and a seal around the neck, that allows a tiny bit of water in as wetsuits are designed to allow water in as your body heats this water trapped between your skin and wetsuit to insulate you.

Drysuit everytime, the insulation comes from the undergarments not the suit
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