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Old 28 November 2012, 11:41   #51
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For me it depends on the launch site and what the goals of the day are. If there is a nice dock and we plan on going for a cruise then typically we are found in street clothes. If the launch site does not have a dock but a nice beach, then often we just beach to pickup passengers, and again in full street clothes. Sometimes a victim doesn't time the swells correctly and gets a shoe wet. My boat trailer allows me to drive on and off of it, so no need to get wet.

When going scuba diving...always in a dry suit. Spent two warm hours yesterday underwater, stayed dry, except sweat, and the launch and recovery require getting in the water. We also have to anchor the boat out so we swim to and from the boat wearing our scuba fins. As mentioned above it is very hard to swim in a drysuit with thick undies. Recovery yesterday due to low tides required putting the transom wheels on and dragging it up the steep boat ramp with the truck, before putting it back on the trailer.

Now as to landing in the water at speed in a drysuit, we have done it thousands of times. We call it wakeboarding and I have crashed in every possible flailing position. Yes sometimes you take water up the sleeves or down the neck, but mostly they are dry. Unless there is a problem they do not leak. Latex is a far better seal for water than neoprene, but today it is all about silicon. Silicon requires a mounting system though.

Wetsuits work okay, but I always seem to get cold in my 7mm semi-dry, and I would never scuba dive again in cold water in a wetsuit. Plus I find the wind on wet neoprene chills me rather quickly. Wetsuit does get used for kayaking in cold water.
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Old 28 November 2012, 12:43   #52
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It depends on the slip and the weather.

1. If i'm going to be wearing a dry suit on the rib then i'll use it for launch and recovery. I won't wear it for only launching and recovering.
2. Sometimes when it's warm i'm happy to get my feet (I'll wear sharx deck shoes) and shorts wet.
3. If it's cooler then i'll use boat wellies unless the slipway is a bit steep or there are a few wavelets when i'll use hip waders. I won't use chest waders as i've heard too many sad tales about fishermen drowning when they've fallen over. (It nearly happened to one of my friends when he tripped whilst fly-fishing but fortunately he managed to get rescued).

My current favourite option is getting launched by the tractor from the park and ride where i currently have my boat.
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Old 28 November 2012, 16:28   #53
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As I am diving mostly I will wear my trusty Otter drysuit. It is just that a DRYSUIT. Thermal protection comes in the form of some pretty fancy undergarments. The thing I find most uncomfortable is when exerting myself, (swimming/ walking to the boat if is at the end of the pontoon/ winching the boat back on the trailer etc) then I sweat a little. That then goes cold and I spend the rest of the time uncomfortable. It's a real bugger if this happens at the start of the day. I have been to sea with my immersion suit on but I feel a little vulnerable. I suspect I would not last 5 mins if I went over the side.
When diving we often have 1.5 hour run times, warm as toast everytime.
Drysuit for me everytime!

Lee
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Old 28 November 2012, 16:48   #54
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As I am diving mostly I will wear my trusty Otter drysuit. I have been to sea with my immersion suit on but I feel a little vulnerable. I suspect I would not last 5 mins if I went over the side.
I've just been to Otter's website; their suits look amazing. They're much more heavy duty that my Gill. Perhaps it's what you mean by 'immersion suit'. Anyway, what are those valve thingys on the dry suits for?
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Old 28 November 2012, 19:19   #55
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There will be an inflation valve for injecting air from the tank into your suit & a dump valve.
The valves are there for inflating & releasing the air that you put in to your suit to overcome the pressure & squeeze of the surrounding water on the way down & back up to the surface.
And adjusting your bouyancy to attain a neutral position at whatever depth.
As far as using for surface, you don't need any valves on your suit!
I use a Gill 2 piece suit with wellies in summer if its fine, sometimes shorts, t-shirt & lifejacket! Winter will be a drysuit with decent thickness 'wooley-bear' underneath.
Always prepare for it to be colder at sea!!!! Have fun!
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Old 29 November 2012, 06:31   #56
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Horses for courses. Calm weather in (warm?) summer on a good slip = shorts & flip flops. Beach launch on a sh1tty day= Drysuit. Perm anything in between. Tractor launching at Ty Calch on a nice day= Immersion suit. As the OP asked specifically about winter, it would be drysuit every time, I ain't going out to sea in winter in anything but. There's no right or wrong, just what suits the conditions, experience will tell.
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Old 29 November 2012, 07:16   #57
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Quote:
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Horses for courses. Calm weather in (warm?) summer on a good slip = shorts & flip flops. Beach launch on a sh1tty day= Drysuit. Perm anything in between. Tractor launching at Ty Calch on a nice day= Immersion suit. As the OP asked specifically about winter, it would be drysuit every time, I ain't going out to sea in winter in anything but. There's no right or wrong, just what suits the conditions, experience will tell.
Adding to what Pikey said..which has got to be right...I would also say that the safetey element afforded be a Good Dry suit should not be underestimated. In adverse conditions-Long Offshore cruiseing-Heavey Sea's-Night passages-effecting a rescue,ect ect, Regarless of Good Tempreture Sunny skys and all....IF the worse happens and you end up in the Drink...you have ALOT better chance of surviveing to tell the tale in a Good well made Drysuit..(You wnt last long in UK waters even if you have the Best Tow piece on Earth)for that reason,regardless of the weather..IMO when you're 'Pushing the envelope' it pays to suit up.
Oh and in Winter the choice of under-garmnts and a good Layered system is just as important as getting the right Drysuit for you!
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Old 29 November 2012, 09:56   #58
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Adding to what Pikey said..which has got to be right...I would also say that the safetey element afforded be a Good Dry suit should not be underestimated. In adverse conditions-Long Offshore cruiseing-Heavey Sea's-Night passages-effecting a rescue,ect ect, Regarless of Good Tempreture Sunny skys and all....IF the worse happens and you end up in the Drink...you have ALOT better chance of surviveing to tell the tale in a Good well made Drysuit..(You wnt last long in UK waters even if you have the Best Tow piece on Earth)for that reason,regardless of the weather..IMO when you're 'Pushing the envelope' it pays to suit up.
Oh and in Winter the choice of under-garmnts and a good Layered system is just as important as getting the right Drysuit for you!
You cant say better than that ! You only get one chance if it goes all peat tong , so it's better to be right first time and be to hot than being Baltic ! As said you can remove items of clothing or even add with a dry suit
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Old 29 November 2012, 11:47   #59
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You cant say better than that ! You only get one chance if it goes all peat tong , so it's better to be right first time and be to hot than being Baltic ! As said you can remove items of clothing or even add with a dry suit
Makes me laugh folk spend thousands on ribs but quibble if they have to spend 2 to 3 hundred on a decent dry suit
Earlier this year we went up the Menai and one rib had a problem with his prop the guy was able to get in the water to have a look as he was wearing a dry suit.
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Old 29 November 2012, 12:37   #60
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Makes me laugh folk spend thousands on ribs but quibble if they have to spend 2 to 3 hundred on a decent dry suit
Earlier this year we went up the Menai and one rib had a problem with his prop the guy was able to get in the water to have a look as he was wearing a dry suit.
It's because they don't keep you dry, apparently...........
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