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Old 27 November 2012, 15:11   #11
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Quote:
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Drysuit everytime, the insulation comes from the undergarments not the suit
+ 1 - however make sure every layer plus the drysuit are breathable
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:19   #12
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I wouldnt want to be sat in a boat again in a wetsuit in winter. Been there done that ...fishing, kayaking, diving, water ski-ing..........b***** freezing. But we are using boats thru the depths of winter. Minus temps mean calm days and used to mean good cod fishing. So cold once I poured my coffee in m'wet suit boots to try and warm m'feet up, and the windchill over the suit-'orrible. Nope drysuit and woolly bear plus a set of thermals underneath and a wooly hat wi earflaps..it ain't pretty but its soooo warm
Alternatively as today- 15m boat, heater, oven, tv and most importantly a kettle and teapot! force 7 NE & blissfully warm and dry! Felt a bit guilty sending crew on deck but someone has to stay at the wheel
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:26   #13
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There was a chap who came diving up at a popular dive site called capernwray. He said it was a hardened northerner and drysuits are for southern softies. He jumped in with his 5mm after the first dive he asked if he could borrow a 5mm shortie to put on over the top of his other wetsuit. Came out shivering after 20 mins. I was lovely and toastie after a 50 min dive. Next time he came with a brand new neoprene drysuit! Still can remember his blue face cracks me up
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:30   #14
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Drysuits ... will allow water in
Mine must be faulty then Either that, or I've misinterpreted the word "dry"
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:30   #15
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You're right about water ingress not being too much of an issue with wet suits and the best of them let very little water in at all. Drysuits are ok but are not intended for long-term immersion; they will allow water in and when that happens you will get cold because of the volume of the suit and the fact that it offers no insulation. I have both a dry and (several) wetsuits for my jet ski and I prefer a wetsuit, especially in the winter.
You haven't had a well fitting drysuit or the seals are too loose. I have spent up to 4 hours in a drysuit, 3 of those hours entirely immersed diving and I've come out dry apart from sweat.
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:35   #16
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Mine must be faulty then Either that, or I've misinterpreted the word "dry"
Mines nice and dry
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:43   #17
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I did all my early diving in a 6mm wet suit. My very first dives were all in January and February one year in the Lake District with ice at the edge of the water. The first three dives then under BSAC diving had to be snorkel dives only...now that was cold with the icy wind blowing across my back whilst doing safety cover for divers below. Silly thing is I thought I was enjoying m'self. I now realise I wasn't
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:46   #18
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he only wants to launch not go diving , wellies should be enough on a good slip surely , thats all i ever need . And if you have a mate to drive the car and trailer there is no need to get wet at all .

I always wonder why some folk completely submerge the trailer then lead the boat around up to thier chest in the water trying to find the trailer below it .
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:47   #19
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I have a Gill 4802 drysuit; it's probably what you'd call a mid-range (375) leasure suit. It fits like a glove as it happens and I've never got wet in it. But having said that, I haven't worn it and then jumped off my ski head first at 20kts like I have when wearing my wetsuit (I practice MOB all the time; you'd be surprised how few jet skiers do). Yes, the wetsuit (O'Neill Psycho II 3/2) will flush under those conditions as will the drysuit. The point is, flushed water is not too much of a problem since (as someone pointed out above) there is very little space between the neoprene and your skin so the water will warm up and provide insulation. However, any flush with a dry suit will result in wet clothing and your becoming cold, eventually. For 99% of rib usage a dry suit is probably the garment of choice since you're unlikely ever to get that wet and unlikely to spend hours in the sea. They're easier to get on and off and far less claustrophobic. However, If I had endure a survival situation I'd (personally) prefer to be in a wetsuit (albeit one that's a bit thicker than the Psycho II- something like the Billabong 765 for example). And as an afterthought, try swimming 50m in a rough sea in a dry suit; I've heard it's very tiring due to the drag. It's hard enough swimming that distance in a wetsuit; again, I've tried.
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Old 27 November 2012, 15:58   #20
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