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Old 31 July 2005, 10:10   #1
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Dry/ immersion suit

Ok folks you've convinced me I really need a dry suit rather than a flotation suit and I can certainly see the arguments for one (especially as I'm planning some solo winter ribbing).
My ribbing trips are usually fairly short typically 2/3 hours from hitching up to unhitching, is it feasible to wear a dry suit throughout i.e. whilst towing/launching/ recovering and returning home or are they more of a 'put on in boat' type garment? Sorry to be a bit blonde... oh alright.. sorry to be a bit... 'getting thin up there aren't you dad!'... about this but I'm not sure I've even seen a dry suit let alone worn one.
Finally is there a difference between an immersion suit and a dry suit?

Kernow.
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Old 31 July 2005, 11:36   #2
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An immersion suit is for boat crew, keeps you dry and therefore warmer if you fall in. A dry suit is for diving and is the opposite to a wet suit.

I have a brand new worn once Viking Suit for sale:

this one

Im 14st and 5'10" and its a bit tight on my crown jewels but I am a lard.

Open to offers?

Andy
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Old 31 July 2005, 12:31   #3
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If you get a surface drysuit (not designed for diving) from somewhere like Ravenspring (like I have the duo), you need to remember that it's not designed to keep you warm, just dry. I tend to use my dry suit throughout the year, even on the warmest of days, with just a t-shirt on underneath, splash some water onto the suit and it's then nice and cool. During the winter however, you need to pile on the thermals underneath to stay warm. What I tend to do is wear jeans, t-shirt and fleece under the dry suit, and if I get cold, I then wear my floatation suit (not immersion suit) ontop of the drysuit. You can then be nice and warm, and very dry

I did look at getting a diving dry suit, but it's slightly more restrictive with body movements than a surface drysuit which has thinner fabric. The surface drysuit is fine for jumping about boat from launching to recovery.

-Alex
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Old 31 July 2005, 13:20   #4
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Kernow

You could wear it in the car, but it's more comfortable not to! It's definitely handy to wear during launching and recovery though as you won't have any worries about getting wet.

The Viking suit that Andy is selling is a dry suit. There are dry suits designed for diving, and dry suits like this one designed for surface use.

The term "immersion suit" is sometimes used to mean a flotation suit like these, sometimes a surface drysuit like Andy's, but most often they are "abandonment suits" designed for emergency use when working offshore. They are waterproof, and (unlike a normal drysuit) are thermally insulating. There's a good page of info here if anyone's interested.

You've probably already had this advice but it's worth repeating:

1 Get a breathable dry suit
2 Get one with a fly zip

John
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Old 31 July 2005, 13:43   #5
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I have had several types myself .Not sure exactly what is a fly zip but aviod having the zip across the back as you are going solo unless you are double jointed if you have a metal zip try to get one that sit under a velcrow flap also one that has pockets is usefull for ovious reasons.Rubber knecks seal better but are not to kind aroud your kneck and you would normaly have to shave that morning .Neaprean knecks are warmer seal ok but do leak when doing water sports.Most companies do not warenty the knecks or cuffs so check this first
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Old 31 July 2005, 13:52   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no fear
Not sure exactly what is a fly zip but aviod having the zip across the back as you are going solo unless you are double jointed
A fly zip? Like in your trousers! Sometimes known as a "comfort" zip

My drysuit has a back zip, and despite being one of the least flexible people in the world I have no problem getting it on and off on my own. I assumed that I wouldn't be able to, but when pushed I discovered it was actually quite easy.

John
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Old 31 July 2005, 21:50   #7
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I think the main difference between surface drysuits and diving ones is that the surface ones are often made of breathable fabric. Very usefull........
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Old 01 August 2005, 03:18   #8
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I use a Crewsaver Hyper Dry. Its got a front zip and storm collar and cuffs. I tend to wear many lite layers underneath, starting with thermal under wear from any of the camping/outdoor shops. Mines got latex socks and I use a set of wetsuit boots over the top. Make sure whatever you get has got a set of braces cos then you can use them as waders, very handy just for launch and recovery.

Martin
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Old 01 August 2005, 08:11   #9
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Diving drysuits also have valves for adding/venting air or gas!? They dont usually have reinforced seats and backs[U] of legs.
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Old 01 August 2005, 13:00   #10
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Thanks for all the input, looks like a breathable dry suit with a fleece underneath then. I'll start shopping, speaking of which
http://www.wetsuitoutlet.co.uk/
seem to be doing very good deals at the moment.
Thanks again
Kernow
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