Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 05 June 2015, 08:33   #11
Member
 
boristhebold's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 7m +
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,293
So I guess if you pull someone out of the water into your boat then ensure they are lying flat on your deck rather than have them sit ?
__________________

__________________
boristhebold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 June 2015, 09:09   #12
Member
 
JamesF's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Sidmouth
Boat name: Various
Make: Avon, Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 40, Honda 50
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 249
That's what I've always been told on RYA First Aid courses. If you've got the space, keep them lying down somewhere out of the wind and get them into a survival bag or blanket.
__________________

__________________
JamesF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 June 2015, 09:14   #13
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 7,595
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by boristhebold View Post
Cold Water Shock & Recovery


Out of the Water is Not Out of Trouble:

I lost count of the number of survivors I annoyed in the back of the helicopter because I wouldn’t let them move. I had a rule – if they came from a cold water environment – they laid down and stayed down until the doctors in the E.R. said they could stand.......
................Just being in water does things to the human body that change it. The pressure of the water on the limbs – particularly the legs (because they are deeper) – forces blood out of the legs and into the core and this raises blood pressure. When the water is cold, we get the added effect of constricting blood vessels in the outer skin layers and extremities (vasocontriction – see The Truth About Cold Water) and this also raises core blood pressure. The body is trying to keep the core warm and more blood in the core and less every where else helps.

Here are some best practices for the recovery from the water phase:

•Recover them as horizontally as possible: If you can avoid lifting them out of the water vertically, do it. If you must lift them out vertically, get them laying down immediately once on board. The hydrostatic pressure on their body has made it easier for their bodies to maintain blood pressure – as soon as they are removed, the heart has to work harder – and a cold heart doesn’t do well at working harder.

Keep Them Down
Quote:
Originally Posted by boristhebold View Post
So I guess if you pull someone out of the water into your boat then ensure they are lying flat on your deck rather than have them sit ?
yup!
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4: See rule#5
Pikey Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 00:38.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.