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Old 07 December 2008, 16:32   #11
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I think there is a case for a sea anchor on board a RIB, particularly as it doesn't take up very much storage space. It does offer you options that you wouldn't have otherwise

We regularly want to stop in deep water (for us it might be to debrief students, but it could be for any reason), and it's simple and effective to deploy our sea anchor. We tend to use a fairly short line of about 10m - I've even used the painter fairly effective on a couple of occasions - to hold us head to sea for a few minutes while we chat.

We've also used sea anchors to stabilise the boat when working with a helicopter in a "broken-down" exercise scenario. The chopper was happier with us head-to-wind than rolling in a beam sea and it apparently made their own approach easier for them.

On a technical point, there is a difference between a sea anchor and a drogue. A sea anchor is designed to hold the bow into the waves, and although it may be parachute shaped or conical it is bigger than a drogue. A drogue is designed to slow the boat down in a following sea so it doesn't surf out of control or broach when overtaken by a wave (not a situation we find ourselves in very often in a RIB). A drogue is smaller, conical, and often with an open end to the cone like a wind sock. I don't see much of an argument for a drogue in a RIB. There are a couple of situations that I could come up with where a drogue might help, but they'd be pretty rare and I think a drogue wouldn't be my first choice in those situations anyway
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Old 07 December 2008, 16:49   #12
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Better still, dont use it. We worked a long time on establish if a sea anchor would work in big seas and the boat ended up being safer without. I would always advocate filling the boat with water if you cannot make headway in big seas or are drifting on to a lee shore.
Not quite the "RYA" way but then again, have they ever had to survive in bad conditions

Alan P
Very poor advice. Why on earth would anyone fill a boat with water whilst drifting towards a lee shore?

If your engine fails and you have a sea anchor...USE IT
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Old 07 December 2008, 17:48   #13
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Very poor advice. Why on earth would anyone fill a boat with water whilst drifting towards a lee shore?

If your engine fails and you have a sea anchor...USE IT
If you fill the boat up with water it becomes exteremely stable and the boat would be much less prone to being blown into the shore.

Besides your an idiot so if it comes down to the choice of listening to a man of Alan's experience or you I think the choice is a fairly simple one.
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Old 07 December 2008, 17:58   #14
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If you fill the boat up with water it becomes exteremely stable
Until the tubes come off, my 6.3 Ocean Pro holds 5 tonnes of water!

Personally I like the water not in the boat.

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Old 07 December 2008, 18:00   #15
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[QUOTE=timw;274234] Very poor advice. Why on earth would anyone fill a boat with water whilst drifting towards a lee shore?


here we go!!

Avon have been producing the flooding hull for 30 years, guess what?Tim nice But.
yes you guessed right,filling a boat full of water for stability, perhaps the traffic fumes have got to you, or maybe your properties have halved in value!!
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Old 07 December 2008, 18:30   #16
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Avon have been producing the flooding hull for 30 years, guess what?Tim nice But.
yes you guessed right,filling a boat full of water for stability, perhaps the traffic fumes have got to you, or maybe your properties have halved in value!!
Perhaps we can manage this without the name calling as otherwise this discussion will be heading to the bilges...

The advantages of Alan's suggestion are presumably - heavier boat, potentially more stable & sits lower in water (so less windage).

The disadvantages are that you are then "in the water" so unless dry suited are getting wet, and even with a dry suit are getting cold quicker. (The advantage of the Avon flooding hull is it keeps the water separate from the people). Also unless you planned/designed your electrics, fuel tank breathers etc properly then your are getting water where you don't want it. Presumably Alan would argue that anyone doing serious ribbing should be properly attired and in a properly constructed boat though.
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Old 07 December 2008, 18:43   #17
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Perhaps we can manage this without the name calling as otherwise this discussion will be heading to the bilges...

The advantages of Alan's suggestion are presumably - heavier boat, potentially more stable & sits lower in water (so less windage).

The disadvantages are that you are then "in the water" so unless dry suited are getting wet, and even with a dry suit are getting cold quicker. (The advantage of the Avon flooding hull is it keeps the water separate from the people). Also unless you planned/designed your electrics, fuel tank breathers etc properly then your are getting water where you don't want it. Presumably Alan would argue that anyone doing serious ribbing should be properly attired and in a properly constructed boat though.
Thats much better a sound argument rather than just a sweeping statement from a numpty. (sorry couldn't help it)
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Old 07 December 2008, 23:42   #18
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Very poor advice. Why on earth would anyone fill a boat with water whilst drifting towards a lee shore?

If your engine fails and you have a sea anchor...USE IT
Have you ever tried using a sea anchor from a rib?

No name calling here-I just want to know why you think you know better than Alan.
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Old 08 December 2008, 03:03   #19
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I have, Alans argument is valid in that it'll make the boat more stable but it won't stop it from surfing down waves or hold the head to sea.
Alan has a wealth of experience but it doesn't mean that everything he says is right.

At the end of the day its upto the individual but I personally would deploy the sea anchor.

Can anyone explain how filling the boat with water actually stops the boat from been beam onto the sea?
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Old 08 December 2008, 03:56   #20
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Hey, what do I know?????????????????
AS for bad advice, Before you all knock what I am saying, wait for a really bad day and try it.
A fully water logged boat of any discripton is better than something sitting on top of the water in any conditions.
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