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Old 07 September 2007, 12:49   #11
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Originally Posted by Larry Sea Star View Post
It would appear so, nice manoeuvre by the Lifeboats, better than a previous clip I saw where the All Weather rammed the casualty to bring it to a stop..
The crew of the ALB had been instructed to stop the RIB in no uncertain terms as it was a hazard to navigation.
Most ropes aboard Lifeboats are sinking and I wouldn't have fancied getting too close to that RIB in an inflatable D class!
They did what they had too.
The Persons on board were drunk and didn't have a killcord.
In all the time I've been on RIBs in rough conditions I've never been thrown off the helm. I think you've only got yourself to blame if you go over the side...


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Old 07 September 2007, 13:13   #12
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In all the time I've been on RIBs in rough conditions I've never been thrown off the helm. I think you've only got yourself to blame if you go over the side...


Phill
So, excepting the dangers of not using kill cords, anyone who's ever been ejected from a rib, did so through their own driver error and nothing to do with being exposed and unconstrained in the boat?
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Old 07 September 2007, 14:17   #13
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So, excepting the dangers of not using kill cords, anyone who's ever been ejected from a rib, did so through their own driver error and nothing to do with being exposed and unconstrained in the boat?
I see your point mate.
What I was getting at that if you accept yours and your boats limitations then you should be ok.
None of the RNLI inshore boats use killcords and I only know of one incident where the helm has gone over board.
In the case of the helm who did go over he was a trainee and didn't know his limitations!
Apparently the RIB hit a freak wave. Watching the video its flat calm, it must have been some freak wave to throw both crew out of the boat.
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Old 07 September 2007, 14:49   #14
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I see your point mate.
What I was getting at that if you accept yours and your boats limitations then you should be ok.
None of the RNLI inshore boats use killcords and I only know of one incident where the helm has gone over board.
In the case of the helm who did go over he was a trainee and didn't know his limitations!
Apparently the RIB hit a freak wave. Watching the video its flat calm, it must have been some freak wave to throw both crew out of the boat.

The chances of a violent hook increase dramaticaly with speed. That rib appeared to have a pair of fairly large motors, maybe is was a fairly quick boat.

Anything sub 30 knots is pretty safe from all that stuff anyways.

It's going 'quick' in the ribs I don't like. Whenever I've done so, I've felt very vulnerable indeed! The slightest steering by the bows at high speed leaves you, as a pretty heavy body, wanting to travel straight on with nothing in the way to stop you.
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Old 07 September 2007, 15:03   #15
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Yeh, they was no mention of speed, suppose if your doing 50kts and hit a wave wrong your in trouble.
Still at least the dog was ok, tough as old boots terriers.
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Old 07 September 2007, 15:17   #16
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It would appear so, nice manoeuvre by the Lifeboats, better than a previous clip I saw where the All Weather rammed the casualty to bring it to a stop..
Around here to stop 'em they utilize a few quick bursts of 50 Cal. Piercing Rounds through the engine room....no muss...no fuss Usually the passengers are still on board but are not inclined to stop for one reason or another
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Old 07 September 2007, 17:29   #17
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Around here to stop 'em they utilize a few quick bursts of 50 Cal. Piercing Rounds through the engine room....no muss...no fuss Usually the passengers are still on board but are not inclined to stop for one reason or another

Now that's what I call RIB talk! Bravo!
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Old 07 September 2007, 17:53   #18
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When you're sat 'in' a decent hardboat, it aint easy to get slung out, as you're pretty well contained within the cockpit. It has to be a very violent hook, or near roll to get ejected, usually it happens to be stepped race, or high perf hard boats that eject the occupants at high speed because they have a tendency to step out, then grip (like a 'high-side' on a motorcycle), but again, usually in a situation where a very high speed turn is being taken.
This is absolute BS. People get ejected from hardboats frequently. Here is a recent example from my neck of the woods;

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Canada/2...9/4455474.html


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However, with most of the blow up botes, you're very much 'on', rather than 'in' the boat. this has been covered on here before. it's rather logical really, they're fundementally unsafe for high speed work. (you wouldn't get me in a quick one unless it had a proper cockpit). I reckon it should be law to wear a kill cord if you choose to use such a dangerous bote....very irresponsible!

If you running at high speeds you should be in a 'proper cockpit' regardless of whether it is a RIB or a hardbote, and you should always be wearing a killcord even if you are in a 'proper cockpit'.
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Old 07 September 2007, 18:29   #19
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It seems to me that the whole design of the throttle lever / kill chord is wrong .
The throttle lever was surely made for slow boats , not fast boats .
The kill chord seems to be added as an afterthought , and its easy to forget to put it on
The only other thing that i can think of that has a hand throttle lever that stays set is a Tractor . Even a lawnmower has a dead mans handle .

A complete re think is what is required IMO
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Old 07 September 2007, 18:41   #20
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This is absolute BS. People get ejected from hardboats frequently. Here is a recent example from my neck of the woods;

http://winnipegsun.com/News/Canada/2...9/4455474.html





If you running at high speeds you should be in a 'proper cockpit' regardless of whether it is a RIB or a hardbote, and you should always be wearing a killcord even if you are in a 'proper cockpit'.
You're a real switched on guy aren't you!

my comments are about how the usual seating setup, and lack of freeboard in rubber dinghies, generaly make them a poor vehicle for fast operation, coz any sharp change in direction is highly likely to result in an 'ejection'. That is not only 'fact', but with half a brain, it's pretty easy to see the logic.

Now, your fabulous comparison of the 61 year old pensioner, sat in a swivel chair at the bow of fast aluminum fishing boat is hardly representative of a performance cockpited hardboat intended for tearing about in a chop, is it!

"Ontario Provincial Police in Kenora said 61-year-old James Smith of Newport, Kentucky, was sitting in a swivel chair at the bow of the five-metre aluminum boat when the operator momentarily lost control of the vessel, causing him to fall out of his seat"

That sir, is nearly as stupid as trying to go fast in a rib!.....horses for courses, as we say here.

If you're going to quote me as talking Bullshit, please at least try and find an example that holds water (excuse the pun)
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