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Old 17 July 2012, 09:04   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Kennett View Post
Unfortunately, in my experience they generally only work for about two weeks then just take up console space!
That's caused by the saw. It's a little known fact, but if you use a saw to fit instruments or electronics to a GRP surface, it drastically lowers the lifespan of the kit. There is another side effect which I haven't had time to research (google) properly, that is that the replacement equipment will almost, but not quite, fill the existing hole...

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Old 17 July 2012, 12:05   #12
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with smartcraft gauges you have to bevery carefull if you mix smartcraft with anologue instruments both systems MUST be kept SEPERATE,
smartcraft is a ref voltage of between 4.9 to 5.1 volts
analogue gauges voltage 12V
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Old 17 July 2012, 20:32   #13
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I don't have a trim gauge. Usually I just glance at the block. Not hard to spot really and trim out to the best possible speed for my RPM. Is this wrong?

Hmmm, RPM gauge hasn't worked for 2 years either....
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Old 17 July 2012, 22:35   #14
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I have the Yamaha gauges which include a trim indicator. The sender tab broke, so I dutifully replaced it. Barely looked at it since. Can't seem to remember that it is actually there. I adjust the trim based on the feel of the boat in the water.

There are so many variables that affect the trim (loading, speed, water conditions) that remembering the trim settings on the gauge for all the combinations would be more than my little brain could handle.

For the most part my boat seems to ride best with the trim all the way down anyway. Depending on the loading I can get maybe another (1) mph out of it by playing with the trim. but putting it up too much just causes the bow to porpoise and makes getting out of the hole too hard.

I usually just put in down trim till the motor stops. About the only time I trim up is if I am in shallow water.
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Old 18 July 2012, 01:05   #15
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Like to have mine working "Trim gauge"

Noted what JK said they donít work for long, well mine is not working but I would like it too.
I can understand what people are saying about not needing them, well sometimes when you are in shallow water nice to have an accurate reading,
Well mine does not do that any more tend to think the problem is at the sender end, (power off gauge drops)
My engine is a 75hp, Mariner (not smart craft)anyone know where the switch is located some ware nasty down the back probably and what type of a job to check or change
Advice please
Stuart
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Old 18 July 2012, 02:26   #16
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stul if you look at the top of your ptt you will see it is connected to the top pin of your ptt, beware the trim sender is handed ie port/stb for your obm
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Old 18 July 2012, 07:21   #17
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I've never had a working one (a gauge) but as discussed tend to trim on the feel of the boat & a glance sternward.

Only reason it was fitted in the first place was I got a good deal on it + a matching voltmeter, and reckoned it would make the console look more symetrical, especially when I found out....

....I may end up using it to show coolant pressure, as the research I've been doing so far implies that the variable resistive pressure senders seem to have much the same resistance range as the trim senders....
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Old 18 July 2012, 19:54   #18
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re ssobol remarks and trim down, have spent last few days in light chop off Mull. A lot of porpoising greatly reduced by trimming right down as opposed to level trim, with no loss of speed and much happier passengers. My question is when is trim up ( above horizontal) useful ? Trim gauge may now be useful. Yes I know its useful to avoid shallow obstacles but when else?
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Old 19 July 2012, 01:34   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freyaflys View Post
A lot of porpoising greatly reduced by trimming right down as opposed to level trim, with no loss of speed and much happier passengers. My question is when is trim up ( above horizontal) useful ?
It is good practice to start off with the engine trimmed fully down before accelerating onto the plane, as you have noted this is the most "planted" setup for the boat. Trimming up with change the feel of the boat, so ignore the gauge telling you where level is.

It will vary with the loading on the day and obviously with the conditions, but an example of trimming out might be on a flat calm day with only one up and no extra weight. You will find the boat skimming perhaps, but be warned it may try and take off.
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Old 19 July 2012, 02:51   #20
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Quote:
Trim gauge may now be useful. Yes I know its useful to avoid shallow obstacles but when else?
this alone would be enough for me but we also take newbies out a lot and some get trimming straight away by feel and sound where as others simply don't have a clue and the gauge is a good starting point.

Dave
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