Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 07 January 2015, 06:32   #11
SPR
Trade member
 
SPR's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Central Belt of Scotland
Boat name: Puddleduck III
Make: Bombard
Length: 5m +
Engine: 50 HP
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,066
no offence - but maybe if dive boat did not display the A flag when doing 30 knots...my pet hate.

2nd pet hate divers who dive from slipways without surface markers...how are we suppose to know when we approach slip...


I know you get numpties in both divers & approaching boats...


www.firstaidatsea.co.uk
www.SPRmarine.co.uk
__________________
SPRmarine / SPRtraining
RYA Training Courses & Safety Equipment Sales
SPR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 06:44   #12
Member
 
Ovey's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth(ish)
Boat name: Wings
Make: Ribeye
Length: 6m +
Engine: Yamaha F115 AETL
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 615
RIBase
Yeah, there is a requirement for the dive boat to only fly the A-flag when divers are actually down, and to stow/hide/remove it when transiting. The majority that I have dived with do this.

The A-flag is the worldwide legislated flag to mean " I have a diver down", and should be used worldwide as such. Unfortunately the red/white scuba flag is used predominantly in the US and is consequently taken to be the "diver down" flag by lots of other countries (where Americans go on holiday), often at the expense of the A flag.

Either flag should be stayed clear of, at low speed. Maybe a warning sign at marinas, slipways or water-access points would help educate those with little or no knowledge but enough money to buy watercraft?
__________________

__________________
There's weather out there - must be time to RIB!

(Or dive, or ref rugby, or.......)
Ovey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 06:46   #13
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Length: 5m +
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 183
SPR, you're right. I've left sites with the A flag still flying 😁. I've also approached a bunch of ribs near known dive sites with no A flags / D Down flying and been told to "F off, can't you see we've got divers in the water".

Wasn't tying to target one group or another in my earlier post - anyone can be numpty in the right circumstances...
__________________
Chunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 07:32   #14
SPR
Trade member
 
SPR's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Central Belt of Scotland
Boat name: Puddleduck III
Make: Bombard
Length: 5m +
Engine: 50 HP
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,066
is a red triangle international recognise? or just UK Highway Code?


www.firstaidatsea.co.uk
www.SPRmarine.co.uk
__________________
SPRmarine / SPRtraining
RYA Training Courses & Safety Equipment Sales
SPR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 07:49   #15
Member
 
Ovey's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth(ish)
Boat name: Wings
Make: Ribeye
Length: 6m +
Engine: Yamaha F115 AETL
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 615
RIBase
Not sure. It's used in certain countries in Europe, if not all, and some in Africa/Asia too. Can't say for sure about the rest of the world though as each country has it's own highway code. Why's that?
__________________
There's weather out there - must be time to RIB!

(Or dive, or ref rugby, or.......)
Ovey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 08:10   #16
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunk View Post
A pictorial rep of a diver surrounded by an internationally recognised warning triangle.
unless to actually see what it says you have to go closer to read it...

Presumably the alphanumeric flags were developed to be more readable at a distance than just holding up the letters?
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 08:20   #17
Member
 
Ovey's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth(ish)
Boat name: Wings
Make: Ribeye
Length: 6m +
Engine: Yamaha F115 AETL
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 615
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poly View Post
Presumably the alphanumeric flags were developed to be more readable at a distance than just holding up the letters?
Correct. The International Code of Signals were derived in 1969 from the numerous countries' independent rules in order to give one code to follow no matter which seaway you were on. The International Maritime Signal Flags fall under this ICS, and the flags were seen as being sufficiently large and bright enough to convey the message required.

The ICS, IMSF and IALA buoyage system have been taken as the international legislation for safe passage on the seas, with the International Rule of the Road making reference to all of these. (Interestingly the US has another slight deviation from IALA, as it does with the A flag/scuba flag).

Wiki'd for ease, rather than finding the full sites:

International Code of Signals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

International maritime signal flags - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________
There's weather out there - must be time to RIB!

(Or dive, or ref rugby, or.......)
Ovey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 09:36   #18
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Length: 5m +
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poly View Post
unless to actually see what it says you have to go closer to read it...

Presumably the alphanumeric flags were developed to be more readable at a distance than just holding up the letters?
Yes, but the argument becomes a wee bit circular. The alphanumeric flags are the best solution so long as they are understood by all. In the UK my gut feel is that the majority of leisure boaters don't understand them.

I'm not saying I'm in favour or against the design, just that I think what we have today doesn't work and it may be time to look at alternatives.

As my ol' pappy used to say "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you always got"
__________________
Chunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 09:41   #19
Member
 
Ovey's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth(ish)
Boat name: Wings
Make: Ribeye
Length: 6m +
Engine: Yamaha F115 AETL
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 615
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ovey View Post
Maybe a warning sign at marinas, slipways or water-access points would help educate those with little or no knowledge but enough money to buy watercraft?
You're right. As I said above, education is the key!
__________________
There's weather out there - must be time to RIB!

(Or dive, or ref rugby, or.......)
Ovey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 January 2015, 10:00   #20
Member
 
JamesF's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Sidmouth
Boat name: Various
Make: Avon, Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 40, Honda 50
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 249
There's already a flag with a well defined meaning, and it's easier to see than a thin black line surrounded by three thin red lines.

I'm not convinced it has any advantage over, say, flying both the correct flag and a sheet of plywood with "Divers. Keep well clear" painted on it in eighteen inch lettering.
__________________

__________________
JamesF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:36.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.