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Old 26 March 2016, 16:16   #1
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Diesel ribs?

So, to ask a "how long is a piece of string" question of people's experience.....

Apart from the particular personalities of petrol v diesel I'm curious as to the general view on diesel inboards in ribs?

If a man was looking at buying a second hand daysil boat (eventually) that he might hope to travel a few hundred miles from home in a week diesel seems to be much more widely available if you aim for fishing harbours.
The three spots you can get petrol on E coast of Ireland are all within the Dublin bay area, so tankering petrol would be v necessary.

What's the max engine hours you'd accept? Are diesel engines assumed to have a finite service life? Assuming a reasonable level of service history.
Do rebuilt engines make you nervous or is that generally a good sign?
How do outdrives survive the non-judgemental love they get from weed and barnacles?

Are they noisy, smelly, slow, hateable beasts? Or smooth, economical, reliable and desirable?
Are they generally the preserve of commercial boats?

I was thinking something of at least 150 hp upwards in 6.5-7.5m.
And this is a longer term planning question rather than money burning a hole in my pocket tonight question.
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Old 26 March 2016, 16:40   #2
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Much the same as "any" inboard, go for closed cooling not direct sea water cooled if you can, or its regular rebuilds imho. 6 Pots are rather nice & smooth, probably not that much choice out there in all honesty.

Yanmar 6's or Ford Mermaids are all you'll find in reality I suspect
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Old 26 March 2016, 17:30   #3
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Yup too many questions.
Diesels are bigger and heavier, but more economical. Mine, 315hp does 1ltr per mm at 30nmph.
They are not noisy or smelly but much more reliable. My diesel ribs have only failed to start when the battery was run down too low. And that is in 16years of owning diesel.
They are "safer" in that you are not sitting on a floating bomb.
They take the sea better, but are not as fast and prone to very slow take up on the throttle.
How any of your questions have I answered?

Loads more opinions along in a minute.
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Old 26 March 2016, 17:49   #4
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A lot depends on your intended use if your just bay hopping and running around local & or doing waters ports I'd say go petrol if your going to do long runs without refuelling go diesel
Diesel ribs are significantly more expensive to maintain & legs can suffer corrosion if left in the water lots more to go wrong
I've got both but for different purposes
Yes they are cheaper to run but you could outweigh that saving in maintenance/ repairs
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Old 26 March 2016, 19:06   #5
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I know of a very well priced, large scorpion over your way with an inboard diesel

I was so tempted to buy it myself and blast it back to southampton and put a cabin on it

If you want the info I'll put you in touch with the guy
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Old 27 March 2016, 07:44   #6
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Diesel

On my second diesel rib and I will never go back to petrol.
First one was a Humber 8.5 with a Volvo KAD44 super engine but quite complicated and not suited to life in an open boat , lots of belts and pulleys to change and fairly complicated electronics which suffered from salt water . The engine was 16 years old when she left me after a life of whale watching and then private use by me. 1l a mile consumption ,amazing performance from the supercharger/turbo charge combination . Top speed around 35kn.
Second one is a Yanmar 6lp much simpler engine ,currently on 1100 hours and I expect it to keep going for several thousand more , new leg fitted due to hitting something before I got her.
Scorpion 8.5 runs at 42kn top speed again 1l a mile at 32kn cruise. Very quite and smooth .Fairly slow until 2000 rpm when turbo comes on then a lively surge up to top speed.
Red diesel currently .92 on pontoon in Portsmouth but other sources are available at much less.
300 mile range not sitting on a bomb as in previous post .
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Old 27 March 2016, 12:06   #7
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Thanks guys,

That's given me a good idea of how you find living with them.

I'm leaning towards one as a long term plan (I suppose otherwise I wouldn't have asked the question) but will see how my needs evolve.
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Old 27 March 2016, 12:19   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian View Post
Yup too many questions.
Diesels are bigger and heavier, but more economical. Mine, 315hp does 1ltr per mm at 30nmph.
They are not noisy or smelly but much more reliable. My diesel ribs have only failed to start when the battery was run down too low. And that is in 16years of owning diesel.
They are "safer" in that you are not sitting on a floating bomb.
They take the sea better, but are not as fast and prone to very slow take up on the throttle.
How any of your questions have I answered?

Loads more opinions along in a minute.
Much more reliable than what? Petrol? I've never experienced a breakdown with a properly maintained outboard.
'Floating bomb' is a little ridiculous , when did anything petrol powered including
Boats you know of explode?? FYI although more diffcult to ignite diesel has more energy content
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Old 27 March 2016, 13:01   #9
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Much more reliable than what? Petrol? I've never experienced a breakdown with a properly maintained outboard.
I've had breakdowns with both outboards and diesels. I'm not convinced that diesels are necessarily more reliable than outboards, but I don't think they're any worse.

Quote:
'Floating bomb' is a little ridiculous , when did anything petrol powered including
Boats you know of explode??

It's not exactly unheard of. Try googling petrol boat explosion and see what you find. To be fair though it's less of a problem with open boats.

As others have said though it's availability of fuel at the quayside that is the big advantage of diesel, especially if you're going anywhere off the beaten track.
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Old 27 March 2016, 14:59   #10
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I've had breakdowns with both outboards and diesels. I'm not convinced that diesels are necessarily more reliable than outboards, but I don't think they're any worse.




It's not exactly unheard of. Try googling petrol boat explosion and see what you find. To be fair though it's less of a problem with open boats.

As others have said though it's availability of fuel at the quayside that is the big advantage of diesel, especially if you're going anywhere off the beaten track.
Can't seem to remember the last time a motor boat / rib floating around the uk coast explodes in a fire storm of glass fibre and body parts.......................i'm sure we've also all owned petrol Cars in the past - oh and funny that none blew up and we're all still alive, amazing
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