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Old 16 January 2007, 04:57   #21
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[QUOTE=Milan;182117]
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Originally Posted by BogMonster View Post
Looking to the future .... I know there are some makes of RIB out there which have some sort of detachable tube system.

I thought you all ready had one
Come here <Smack> That was not funny

No, the innovative system I have detaches one part of the tube from another part of the tube, what I want is to detach the whole tube set from the boat without deflating it and when I want it to rather than when the tube decides to. And then I want to put it back on again without bother

So there are some options, though I think Zodiacs are pretty expensive compared to the "sensibly priced" ones like Humber, Ribcraft, Osprey? I haven't managed to turn up any sort of "UK price list" though there was an item in Rib Intl about boat prices, I just need to find where I put it....

Basically the ballpark will be 5.5 to 6 metres with probably about 115hp for less than 20k ex works UK, the Zodiac Pro ones look like an option though the console/seating options looked more of the "oooh look at my superyacht this is just the toy boat with stripey seats" type rather than proper jockey consoles. Maybe there are options available though, need to look in to it more. I'm surprised that folks like Humber don't offer the option as they seem to sell to the rescue/dive/commercial market where the ability to change a set of accident damaged tubes quite quickly would surely be a real bonus to keep the boat working.

I think I'm also right in saying that Zods come with PVC tubes don't they? which is a drawback, on the other hand if they are easily replaceable then a 5 year useful life is not such a big deal. On the other other hand my Hypalon tubes have only lasted 5 years so maybe there's not much in it
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Old 16 January 2007, 06:16   #22
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Originally Posted by BogMonster View Post
I'm surprised that folks like Humber don't offer the option as they seem to sell to the rescue/dive/commercial market where the ability to change a set of accident damaged tubes quite quickly would surely be a real bonus to keep the boat working.
I agree that you there could be benefits in the commercial field, but I think one of the reason that zodiacs etc probably started doing detachable tubes for the leisure market could ahve been the perceieved reduction in risk.

When we were looking when I was a teenager, RIBS were largely out of the question, as the boat had to live on the driveway and we live on a busy road. did not want the risk of tubes being slashed etc. Detachable ones would have been great, even if a bit of a hassle.
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Old 16 January 2007, 06:44   #23
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I agree that you there could be benefits in the commercial field, but I think one of the reason that zodiacs etc probably started doing detachable tubes for the leisure market could ahve been the perceieved reduction in risk.
That's the reason for me - I may never need to change the tubes (bloody hope not after the nightmare I have had) but I have peace of mind in knowing that if all else fails and I open them up from end to end on a pontoon or something, a couple of grand will see it as good as new with no specialist skills required. Much the same reason for sticking with an outboard motor - at the end of the day if it breaks big time, you can take it off, throw it away and fit another complete engine!

The first owner of this had the tubes knifed so it even happens here - fortunately the knifer was a bit dim and stuck it straight through rather than running it along the tube so it was not hard to fix!
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Old 16 January 2007, 08:14   #24
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[QUOTE=BogMonster;182125] [QUOTE=Milan;182117]

Come here <Smack> That was not funny

No, the innovative system I have detaches one part of the tube from another part of the tube, what I want is to detach the whole tube set from the boat without deflating it and when I want it to rather than when the tube decides to. And then I want to put it back on again without bother

Sorry Stephen could not resist
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Old 16 January 2007, 09:16   #25
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valentine class rib lifeboats as used by KNRM in holland (and also Cromer independent I think in uk) tubes attached by webbing straps. They had one in for service when I last visited them-just dropped the tubes off before taking it into the workshops to save some space in there.
Caister not Cromer. Very nice indeed.
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Old 19 January 2007, 16:28   #26
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Quick question on Zodiacs...

How easy/difficult is it to repair this "Strongan Duotex" fabric they are built of in the event of a minor repair being required? The tubes themselves are heat welded but I assume if you pop a wee hole in it you just glue it?

Zodiac owners - any comments from personal experience please?

I still prefer the Ospreys in other respects but the ability to change out a set of tubes easily if the worst comes to the worst is sooo appealing after my recent "experiences".
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Old 19 January 2007, 17:26   #27
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If i remember correctly, Bombard also did removable tubes, but not sure what the system was that they used. This is quite some years back, when they were definitely part of the Zodiac group. don't know who owns them not, so maybe they no longer do them.
I think that the following is the case:
Avon are considered the upper end of Yachtline Ribs
Zodiac are the middle range
Bombard are the low end and the end that they promote for commercial
With Zodiac being the main company.
I have seen the Zodiac with the tubes sliding off easily on the small ribs.

It would be a reasonable thing to do on the Medline III which is over the 3 mtr width for legal towing.

Frankly it sounds like a lot of hard work to me.

My walker Bay has the same idea as I put them on my self. Washing up liquid is a suitable lubricant....
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Old 19 January 2007, 20:39   #28
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How easy/difficult is it to repair this "Strongan Duotex" fabric they are built of in the event of a minor repair being required?
Stephen, do a search on glueing PVC. It's all here on RIBNET somewhere.

It's very similar in process to glueing hypalon but the glue works by a different mechanism and it is not necessary to roughen the surface. Additionally, the adhesive is left to dry but, unlike hypalon adhesive, it does not then stick well. A light brushing of MEK is wiped over the glue and the surfaces are brought together immediately. So you advance along the glue seam, bit by bit, wiping before you. MEK is used for the surface preparation too and it's essential for the best joint. Acetone or thinners doesn't do the job properly. It's not used as a degreaser as I've heard someone say, it is part of the glueing process.

I've also used a method where the surfaces are brought together while the adhesive is still damp but it's a hassle because the surfaces you are dealing with are sticky.

Some folk feel this method is more difficult than hypalon glueing but I reckon not although the joint is immediate and very powerful. However, though not at all desirable, if you absolutely must, a badly aligned joint can be reopened by flushing MEK into the joint area and gently pulling the surfaces apart while continually flushing.

As you found when glueing your cone, it is essential to keep the hypalon adhesive surfaces away from each other else they stick but using the above method it's not so critical and I'm sure you can see the advantage of wiping only 50mm at a time and then pressing it together.

I wouldn't shy away from PVC, it makes a very sturdy, rigid tube because it doesn't have the stretch of hypalon but it does cut more easily and things like barnacles can take a wee strip out if you slide along them. As for deterioration, I had a 5mtr PVC inflatable for a few years and the material looked the same when I sold it as it did when I bought it new....but I don't live in the Falklands. I've also got a PVC tender which is 6 years old and fine but it lives under cover so perhaps that doesn't count.
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Old 20 January 2007, 02:18   #29
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http://www.nrsweb.com/repair/clifton...e_adhesive.asp

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Old 20 January 2007, 02:36   #30
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Stephen, do a search on glueing PVC. It's all here on RIBNET somewhere.
There are some links in the RIBnet FAQ (such as it is) here: http://rib.net/forum/showthread.php?t=8972

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