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Old 23 August 2016, 14:52   #21
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If you have your suit made to measure with the right under clothes you can wear them all day I've done it for years rescue services do it all the time I bought a seaskin rescue suit made exactly as I wanted it this year 450 boots, pocket, front zip, neoprene seals, breathable material, reflective tapes really comfortable.
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Old 24 August 2016, 03:25   #22
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Thanks and i've just taken a look at the seaskin rescue suit but it states -

If the intension is that the suit is being worn in case of accidental immersion then a breathable survival suit may well be a better option.

So just wondering which one has the breathable material ?

Cheers
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Old 24 August 2016, 09:52   #23
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I have a few drysuits, the best one for leisure boating is, IMO, my Musto HPX. I've been out in truly awful conditions in it and it's always been good, wear it with shorts and a T shirt in summer and a Weezle thermal undersuit in winter and it's good to go.

Have a look on eBay, they pop up from time to time, I think I gave about 250 for mine, compared to a grand retail, and it was still on the original seals that hadn't even been cut down, I'd be astonished if it had ever even been in the water.
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Old 24 August 2016, 11:10   #24
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Thanks and i've just taken a look at the seaskin rescue suit but it states -

If the intension is that the suit is being worn in case of accidental immersion then a breathable survival suit may well be a better option.

So just wondering which one has the breathable material ?

Cheers
the rescue suit is breathable what its saying is its designed as a rescue suit to be worn for long periods but if you fall in it doubles as a complete dry suite and worn with a life jacket.ideal for boating where its very durable and comfortable.
download the order form and build a suit it explains exactly what you get.

cheers
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Old 24 August 2016, 11:19   #25
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Don't forget if you're wearing a drysuit a couple of things to remember:

1. Burp your suit, get in, get it zipped up, then pull your neck seal out with two fingers and crouch down as low as you can, you'll feel the air rush out of the pulled out neck seal, this is to make sure you've not got a load of air trapped which could be dangerous if you go in inverted and it goes into your socks.

2. You should wear a 275N lifejacket to ensure it has sufficient buoyancy to right you even if you've got air trapped in your suit.

Good drysuits are pleasant enough to wear for long periods, I was in my swiftwater rescue suit all day Sunday and it was perfectly comfortable.
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Old 24 August 2016, 11:25   #26
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Have a look on eBay, they pop up from time to time, I think I gave about 250 for mine, compared to a grand retail, and it was still on the original seals that hadn't even been cut down, I'd be astonished if it had ever even been in the water.
There's two HPX's from the MOD on Ebay for sale in size Large and one MPX in XL that looks good. You can always call them for more information on condition and best offer price.
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Old 24 August 2016, 11:45   #27
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Don't forget if you're wearing a drysuit a couple of things to remember:



1. Burp your suit, get in, get it zipped up, then pull your neck seal out with two fingers and crouch down as low as you can, you'll feel the air rush out of the pulled out neck seal, this is to make sure you've not got a load of air trapped which could be dangerous if you go in inverted and it goes into your socks.



2. You should wear a 275N lifejacket to ensure it has sufficient buoyancy to right you even if you've got air trapped in your suit.



Good drysuits are pleasant enough to wear for long periods, I was in my swiftwater rescue suit all day Sunday and it was perfectly comfortable.

+1 to all the above, I do recall a long time ago, someone trying to tell me I was talking b0110x when I said you needed a higher buoyancy LJ when wearing a drysuit.


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Old 24 August 2016, 13:11   #28
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I was going to say get some dry suit training, ankle weights are a good investment if your new to dry suits but if you tuck up and use your arms to propel to the surface you will soon right your self as someone said dump the air first through the neck or wrist seals to avoid excessive buoyancy in the suit.its second nature to a diver and not a problem to invert have a practise with someone with you.

Cheers
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Old 24 August 2016, 16:33   #29
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Totally agree with the advice on burping your suit....!

Years ago, an instructor showed us a demo, of a 'rescuer' that had not correctly 'burped' his suit, that very quickly became the person that needed to be rescued...!

If you get a DS, go to your local water hole.... and have a play / practise, in safety, and see for yourself, how strange it feels, just in shallow safe water.
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Old 24 August 2016, 18:15   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markmullen View Post
Don't forget if you're wearing a drysuit a couple of things to remember:

1. Burp your suit, get in, get it zipped up, then pull your neck seal out with two fingers and crouch down as low as you can, you'll feel the air rush out of the pulled out neck seal, this is to make sure you've not got a load of air trapped which could be dangerous if you go in inverted and it goes into your socks.

2. You should wear a 275N lifejacket to ensure it has sufficient buoyancy to right you even if you've got air trapped in your suit.

Good drysuits are pleasant enough to wear for long periods, I was in my swiftwater rescue suit all day Sunday and it was perfectly comfortable.
Yep +2 to all that
Even when you think you have all the air out - some will always remain.
The trapped air will tend to float you in the water in a much more horizontal attitude, and therefore with your airway closer to the water's surface. Having a 275N lifejacket will lift your airway higher.
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